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Glow In Dark Mushrooms?


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#1 BetweenDimensionalPassings

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 09:24 AM

I know these mushrooms exist and was wondering if anyone knew the name to the species? Are they illegal in Canada as well? And if not, how would I be able to obtain the strain? Can I eat this mushroom or is it for looks? If I ate the mushroom (assuming it's non harmful) will I glow green (like hulk)?


As much information as I can get on these would be nice, definitely trying to get a print so I can light up the outside of my house all summer! Perhaps if we can get a spore located, we can get a few people on board? :D:D:D:D

glowing_mushroom_by_melvynyeo-d37ufvp.jp


Edited by BetweenDimensionalPassings, 23 August 2014 - 09:24 AM.

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#2 BetweenDimensionalPassings

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 09:52 AM

Just found out there's 7 different types of glow in the dark mushrooms, there's no real name for them but said to be psychedelic (not sure if that speaks for the 7 different types or just 1). These are all over Brazil can be seen easily in the night if you go searching for them. 

Definitely intriquing, sounds like a cool find and if these are psychedelic do they belong to the psilocybe family?



#3 Pilzkopf

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 10:48 AM

I don't believe there's a bioluminescent psilocybe member. But wouldn't it be amazing if there were..



#4 gatekeeper

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 11:22 AM

They're all legal, you can buy spore plugs for like 20 bucks for one or two of the species. Left mine in the fridge and someone threw them away sadly



#5 niemandgeist

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 12:47 PM

Here is a nice Wired.com article concerning 7 species of glow-in-the-dark mushrooms. Scientific names are included for some of them:

 

http://www.wired.com...cent-mushrooms/

 

Also, Wikipedia does have a lengthy list of known bioluminescent fungi:

 

http://en.wikipedia....minescent_fungi

 

I wonder how one would go about getting a spore print of any of these, though. One might have to send e-mails or postal letters requesting information from universities that have mycologists doing research on these cute little mushrooms.

 

From what I can tell, none of these are psychedelic. Didn't see if any are supposed to be edible, but didn't read the whole Wikipedia list.

 

Pretty cool that there are some 70 bioluminescent fungi! I wonder why they glow...


Edited by niemandgeist, 23 August 2014 - 12:49 PM.


#6 LoveOverWar

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 01:51 PM

Hey niemandgeist i was looking at one of the vendors i think we sponsor them, But they sell one variety of the bioluminescent fungi you are looking for.

http://sporeworks.co...re-Syringe.html

""do not produce edible or internally medicinal mushrooms."", ''"poisonous causing severe cramps and vomiting as soon as 30 minutes after ingestion. Poisoning symptoms generally last several hours with no long term effects.""

I try to find a picture or article. One of the members here had a incomplete grow log, but there was a cool picture i wanted to redirect here for you.

post-35560-138194934235.jpg


Edited by LoveOverWar, 23 August 2014 - 01:52 PM.


#7 Pilzkopf

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 08:59 PM

Ugh...that guy went with high ISO and low exposure time...bad choice.

But this does intrigue me. Why are we not stockpiling spores and cultures of *cool* and *useful* fungi that aren't psychedelic. All fungi deserve to live, except trichoderma. Why are we not helping to preserve their genetics?



#8 niemandgeist

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 10:35 PM

Hey niemandgeist i was looking at one of the vendors i think we sponsor them, But they sell one variety of the bioluminescent fungi you are looking for.

http://sporeworks.co...re-Syringe.html

""do not produce edible or internally medicinal mushrooms."", ''"poisonous causing severe cramps and vomiting as soon as 30 minutes after ingestion. Poisoning symptoms generally last several hours with no long term effects.""

I try to find a picture or article. One of the members here had a incomplete grow log, but there was a cool picture i wanted to redirect here for you.

post-35560-138194934235.jpg

LoveOverWar,

How fantastic that someone, somewhere, has thought it through to provide spores for such an interesting fungus. :) Thank you for bringing this to my attention. I'm not sure that I would want to rear glowing fungi. To me: They are all wonderful. I'm simply happy to spot, in the Autumn, a nice, fat, juicy puffball, cut it in half, make sure there are no gills (a true puffball that I can EAT!), and sautee that mofo and consume it. :)

Glowing fungi would be wonderful. I would just be concerned over making sure that I could provide it with an environment that it prefers. I wouldn't want to try to raise anything from seed or spores that I couldn't give a good home to.

So amazing, though. :)


Edited by niemandgeist, 23 August 2014 - 10:37 PM.


#9 Pilzkopf

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 10:47 PM

Just a note: The very first submarine design was intended to use bioluminscent fungi for light within the vessel.



#10 Arathu

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 11:33 AM

Omphalotus olearius, the Jack-o-Lantern, is bioluminescent and probably does not need any kind of saving at all. Actually I'm convinced they along with a huge number of other species will by far outlast the human race and be responsible for cleaning up our messes. As they have always done, restoring the soil layer by reducing complex molecules into simpler renewed building blocks, this IMHO is their primary function. I think that many of these characteristics i.e. bioluminescence, psychoactivity, and etc.  are actually communicative in nature. 

Locating a nice safe to walk path through good mushroom country in the daylight and hopefully one of the species with this characteristic is a good place to start. I have found a tree that jack-o-lanterns fruited on several years in a row and now I'm waiting so I can go and see if I can detect the glow in the dark (yes I'm goofy enough to wander around in the forest in the pitch black) but especially I want to set the camera up on a tripod and do some long exposures. Night vision gear would make easy work of this.

I'm pretty sure that I've seen several things glowing in the woods at night............. :biggrin:

http://botit.botany....ungi/oct97.html


Edited by Arathu, 24 August 2014 - 11:34 AM.

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#11 niemandgeist

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 11:44 AM

One of these days it would be lovely to take an evening walk out in the woods and try to see if there may be any faintly glowing fungi. The only issue is that the only woods in this area, the only nature paths, etc., are all in public parks, which are closed at dusk. There are two that are for some odd reason open until 10pm year-round, though, but they have winky dink paths. Maybe I'll give them a try, though. You never know where mushrooms may show!


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#12 niemandgeist

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 01:31 PM

Omphalotus olearius, the Jack-o-Lantern, is bioluminescent and probably does not need any kind of saving at all. Actually I'm convinced they along with a huge number of other species will by far outlast the human race and be responsible for cleaning up our messes. As they have always done, restoring the soil layer by reducing complex molecules into simpler renewed building blocks, this IMHO is their primary function. I think that many of these characteristics i.e. bioluminescence, psychoactivity, and etc.  are actually communicative in nature. 

Locating a nice safe to walk path through good mushroom country in the daylight and hopefully one of the species with this characteristic is a good place to start. I have found a tree that jack-o-lanterns fruited on several years in a row and now I'm waiting so I can go and see if I can detect the glow in the dark (yes I'm goofy enough to wander around in the forest in the pitch black) but especially I want to set the camera up on a tripod and do some long exposures. Night vision gear would make easy work of this.

I'm pretty sure that I've seen several things glowing in the woods at night............. :biggrin:

http://botit.botany....ungi/oct97.html

Sorry to reply again, after having already replied, but I wanted to let everyone know:

I have contacted Professor Volk, the author of the entry on the "Jack-O-Lantern mushroom" URL included in the quoted text, via e-mail, asking him for tips on where I might possibly want to look for specimens of this mushroom this fast-approaching Autumn, in my area of the USA. I have also asked him if he has any suggestions as to which hardwoods might be most appropriate for a substrate, if I were to find an appropriate specimen to take a spore print from. I'm going to do more of my own research, but I feel it would be a good idea to take his advise if he responds, as he knows his stuff.

I wonder if, since this is a robust, wild-growing mushroom, if I could simply get away with taking an appropriate specimen, cutting the stipe away, and laying it down on the appropriate substrate, hoping that it decides to drop its spores. We have plenty of hardwood logs in my back yard destined for firewood, and I know how to identify some hardwoods thanks to my father being a Master Carpenter. I have made an inquiry regarding this very thing to professor Volk, so let's see if he finds the time to respond.

If I get a response from him, I will be certain to update, as I know I am not the only one who would love to have some of these fine little fellows growing in a mini terrarium for a conversation piece, and to introduce them to my backyard as well.

Arathu: Thank you so much for the link. :)


Edited by niemandgeist, 24 August 2014 - 01:31 PM.

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#13 MrGumball

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 02:20 PM

O. olearius is referred to as the Jack-O-Lantern.

 

O. illudens is also referred to as the Jack-O-Lantern.

 

O. illudens is found in the United States, O. olearius is not. 

 

Phylogeny of the genus Omphalotus based on nuclear ribosomal DNA-sequences


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#14 BetweenDimensionalPassings

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 08:41 AM

These mushrooms at one point went extincted for a hundred or more years till recently 2009, they appeared in Brazil's rain forest and started traveling all across the states. What makes it interesting is, the mushroom uses bugs to transport the mushroom ALL OVER, so in no time these will light up the night sky. 



#15 Blueringer

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 10:20 AM

Here is some pannelus stipticus myc I grew a while back.
panellusstipticus5.jpg
panellusstipticus3.jpg
panellusstipticus1.jpg

 

Its was growing on a suplimented aspen shaving substrate.


Edited by Blueringer, 25 August 2014 - 10:23 AM.

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#16 LoveOverWar

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 01:06 PM

How cool would it be to find a wild field of these.

It would remind me of avatar or something.

Wouldnt it be cool if there was a unknown variety that glowed pink or orange or blue even.

Can you imagine a symbiotic relationship with a glowing fungus and a tree, giving the tree a bioluminescent glow.

 

9c77bcf34e8114c0ad7a7942dc428307-d68jrir



#17 LoveOverWar

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 01:08 PM

Wow blueringer those pictures are awesome, i thought for a second you were using a black light.

Thanks for sharing.



#18 riseabovethought

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 01:11 PM

Might the trip be especiallly colorful?  I like the idea that its communicative, to glow, and to allow us access with active alkaloids..  I also wonder about genetically combining pans or cubes with a bioluminescent variety.  Or how about using bioluminescent plankton to make my cubies glow.  That'd be so cool!  Science!  Muahahahaha (maniacal laugh)....and again .. Muahhahahahahaha!

 

bioluminescent-phytoplankton-glowing-org


Edited by riseabovethought, 25 August 2014 - 01:16 PM.


#19 niemandgeist

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 03:06 PM

Blueringer:

I bet you kept that jar out every evening as you faded off to sleep, no? Wonder how bright it was in a dark room with eyes adjusted. It makes sense that I've thought it over, that the mycelium would also glow, but I didn't even think to imagine what that would be like while you were waiting for it to colonize inside of a jar!



#20 BetweenDimensionalPassings

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 05:13 PM

It's a shame when movies make more sense than reality at times, especially in the connections they make with our evolution.


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