Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

The three sisters


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 gremlinchode

gremlinchode

    Fed after Midnight

  • Expired Member
  • 806 posts

Donator

Posted 15 December 2014 - 10:33 AM

The Three Sisters are the three main agricultural crops of various Native American groups in North Americasquashmaize (corn), and climbing beans (typically tepary beans or common beans).

In one technique known as companion planting, the three crops are planted close together. Flat-topped mounds of soil are built for each cluster of crops.[1] Each mound is about 30 cm (12 in) high and 50 cm (20 in) wide, and several maize seeds are planted close together in the center of each mound. In parts of the Atlantic Northeast, rotten fish or eels are buried in the mound with the maize seeds, to act as additional fertilizer where the soil is poor.[2] When the maize is 15 cm (6 inches) tall, beans and squash are planted around the maize, alternating between the two kinds of seeds. The process to develop this agricultural knowledge took place over 5,000–6,500 years. Squash was domesticated first, with maize second and then beans being domesticated.[3][4] Squash was first domesticated 8,000–10,000 years ago.[5][6]

The three crops benefit from each other. The maize provides a structure for the beans to climb, eliminating the need for poles. The beans provide the nitrogen to the soil that the other plants utilize, and the squash spreads along the ground, blocking the sunlight, helping prevent establishment of weeds. The squash leaves also act as a "living mulch", creating a microclimate to retain moisture in the soil, and the prickly hairs of the vine deter pests. Maize lacks the amino acids lysine and tryptophan, which the human body needs to make proteins and niacin, but beans contain both and therefore maize and beans together provide a balanced diet.

Source Wikipedia 

I read about this in an interesting book

 
Here are some links if you are interested in this topic and would like further information.
 
 
 
 
 

Edited by gremlinchode, 15 December 2014 - 11:21 AM.

  • AGAMA and Juthro like this

#2 Juthro

Juthro

    dope smoking hillbilly

  • OG VIP
  • 9,431 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 15 December 2014 - 12:52 PM

Cool stuff Grem, at first glance of your thread title I was expecting you to have gone in the woods again. This time in the back country outside of Sisters Oregon.

Three_sisters2.jpg



So when I found this, it was unexpected AND cool!

Peace to you brother
  • MrGumball, gremlinchode and tobh like this

#3 gremlinchode

gremlinchode

    Fed after Midnight

  • Expired Member
  • 806 posts

Donator

Posted 16 December 2014 - 11:16 AM

Peace to you too bro!   :biggrin:



#4 tobh

tobh

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 62 posts

Posted 15 February 2015 - 10:19 PM

Very cool. This just settled it, will definitely be growing some corn this year.

 

And I thought the same thing, thought you were around Sisters, Oregon. Gorgeous area out there, and the road to Salem is fun as hell to drive :)


  • Juthro likes this

#5 Juthro

Juthro

    dope smoking hillbilly

  • OG VIP
  • 9,431 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 15 February 2015 - 10:36 PM

I lived in the Santiam Canyon for years. Highway 22 between Salem and Sisters I think is still statistically the most dangerous highway in the state, as in the most fatalities per mile of road.

But that part of the world is awful pretty though, and its hard not to think of the PNW as me real home no matter where I live.


I wish I could grow corn where I live now, but the grow season is to short. We often carry our snow though until the first part of June.
  • tobh likes this

#6 tobh

tobh

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 62 posts

Posted 15 February 2015 - 11:42 PM

My brother told me that same thing about Hwy 22. I left the PNW about 13 months ago :( have missed it every minute I've been gone, despite Salem being the a-hole of Oregon.

 

I wanted to generate a bunch of spawn and release it around the area. Thought cubies would do great.

 

On the topic at hand though, what impacts are had on the soil over a period of, say, 5 growing seasons? Will this soil become increasingly infertile or will it actually increase quality-wise?


Edited by tobh, 15 February 2015 - 11:43 PM.

  • coorsmikey and Juthro like this

#7 Juthro

Juthro

    dope smoking hillbilly

  • OG VIP
  • 9,431 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 17 February 2015 - 12:03 PM

On the topic at hand though, what impacts are had on the soil over a period of, say, 5 growing seasons? Will this soil become increasingly infertile or will it actually increase quality-wise?


It depends what you are growing, and if you adding any amendments to your soil. Cover crops such as sweet pea, vetch or other legume's for example work well as green manure and keep your soil for becoming infertile by putting organic matter and nutrients back in the ground.

This is why farmers rotate their crops, as on large scale it makes a difference in the bottom line since they don't have to buy as much fertilizer.
  • tobh likes this




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!