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green roof project


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#1 fungoliafarms

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 09:55 PM

Anyone else ever built a green roof?

I got the opportunity to help install one at the local university today, and donated plant nutrients to minimize the initial cost. It felt really good to be out working in the sun after this harsh winter, and i also ran into several folks who took the mushroom cultivation class i taught.

A couple things i learned about their execution- select drought tolerant plants, this one used several varieties of succulents. Use light colored walkway tiles to reflect light. Pretty basic stuff, but hopefully i can learn more from you folks!

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#2 Juthro

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 10:14 PM

Very cool, thanks for sharing and showing.
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#3 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 10:27 PM

Kick ass. They just earned 2-9 arbitrary points towards the Leed Certification of their choice for that building! Add some solar panels or a wind turbine and some passive solar windows on the south side and it would probably be a Leed Silver certified building.

Native plants that require no irrigation really skyrocket your points (and your tax breaks/grant monies in certain areas)...

*edit* Concerning walkway color, you need to choose light or dark based on the number of heating vs cooling days in a year. If you run the A/C more days than the heat you want light roofs. If you are in a "winter city" you might want dark roofs to absorb the sunlight and melt snow, etc.

Keep up the good work!

Edited by Phineas_Carmichael, 01 April 2015 - 10:42 PM.
Mom's an architect & I keep remembering things she has said...

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#4 TurkeyRanch

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 10:31 PM

Thanks for sharing!

I would want to add in some edible plants, it makes sense. Maybe a system to save water, and then apply it in dry periods?

This is the wave of the future, France is making green roofs on new buildings a law.

http://news.national...ildings-energy/

France, long the world's arbiter of haute couture, is taking aesthetics to a loftier level: the rooftop.
As it spruces up its green portfolio ahead of global climate talks in December, France approved a law last week that requires the roofs of new commercial buildings be covered—at least in part—by either solar panels or plants.
Green roofs have gained popularity in recent years as more cities worldwide promote their use as a way to save energy. Some, including Canada's Toronto or Switzerland's Basel, even mandate rooftop vegetation in building bylaws.
Advocates say these roofs—whether bedecked in sedums, vegetable plants, or wildflowers—help insulate buildings and thereby reduce the need for both heating and air conditioning.
The impact can be substantial. A study this week by Spanish researchers found that dense foliage can reduce the heat entering a building through the roof by 60 percent and act as a passive cooling system.
Green roofs help reduce runoff by retaining rainwater and improve air quality by absorbing pollutants. By taking in more heat during the day than they can release overnight, the plant-covered surfaces can also lower the "heat island" effect in urban areas that are warmed by asphalt roads and tar roofs. (Green walls offer similar benefits.)
In densely-developed cities, they also offer birds a place to nest and people a place to grow food. (In Brooklyn, rooftop garden grows.)
Green roofs cost more to install and maintain, and their price and complexity deter many homeowners and developers. Yet a 2008 University of Michigan study found that their benefits, including a longer-than-average lifespan, more than offset the extra up-front investment.
France, which relies mostly on nuclear power for its electricity, is taking other steps to green its buildings. Last month, the second level of its most iconic structure—the Eiffel Tower—was outfitted with two wind turbines.


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#5 wildedibles

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 10:46 PM

[Direct Link]

 

[Direct Link]


Edited by wildedibles, 01 April 2015 - 10:55 PM.

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#6 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 11:19 PM

Great vids Wildedibles!

...

I would want to add in some edible plants, it makes sense. Maybe a system to save water, and then apply it in dry periods?

...

Both runoff collection and edible plants would add points to your Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification and help with grants & tax breaks as well.

It never hurts to make friends with an architect and a structural engineer for projects like this...

Edited by Phineas_Carmichael, 01 April 2015 - 11:22 PM.

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#7 fungoliafarms

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Posted 02 April 2015 - 08:57 AM

The building is actually seeking to obtain a silver leed structure certification. I found out some more about its design this morning, these new structures are so well thought out!

In addition to the green roof, rain water is collected and tested for cleanliness in the building's environmental labs, as well as using the rain water to flush the toilets.

The roof is designed to hold an inch of water for an hour before releasing it into the city's sewer system, since flooding is a huge issue here in the spring.
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#8 happy4nic8r

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Posted 02 April 2015 - 11:58 AM

I built a green roof project, and the one thing nobody figured on was the roots.

 

they wormed their way into the cracks in the concrete, right through the waterproofing membranes, and we had a few different types.

 

This was in 1989, so there wasn't a lot of info then, and no internet.

 

Pick the plants carefully, this guy wanted vines to grow up and look cool on the second and third story structures that surrounded the "green roof".

 

It had a swimming pool in it as well, and the pool never leaked, but all the planter areas did.

 

I finally gave up and the guy died so I don't know what the final verdict was on this one.






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