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Juthro's Garden to be


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#61 Juthro

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 01:39 PM

Harvested the rest of my red potatoes yesterday and I am now drying them for storage. We will end up canning some, and would like to try dehydrating some as well this year, as I think we are going to have more then we can eat before they go bad (we would donate it to the food bank, or friends and neighbors first. I don't like to waste)

spuds.jpg

I already have about 15 lbs of reds in a cardboard box in the garage. And we are going to wait until the frost kills off the russets before we harvest them, but I expect a similar amount of produce from them.
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#62 wildedibles

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Posted 02 October 2015 - 12:34 AM

If i remember right u need to slice the potatoes and wash the starch a bit before dehydrating them or they will turn black just pat them dry then dehydrate after the wash they should dry up nice that way ;)
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#63 Juthro

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Posted 02 October 2015 - 12:25 PM

You are correct WildE. We ran them through a mandolin to get uniform size chips, and then steam blanch them. That does a pretty good job of keeping them from blackening while drying. Well with most verities anyway, we still had some trouble with our French Fingerling's, but it appears to be only cosmetic (a slight darkening of the chips).

Then it is to the dehydrator for finishing. We plan on using them in baked dishes like like potato's au gratin. We did can up a case of our best looking medium sized (golf ball to goose egg in size) spuds in pint jars. I do love me some fried canned potatoes for breakfast. It's the way they crisp up, brown and crunchy on the outside and all soft and fluffy on the inside. Lol, I'm making myself hungry :)

It's about time to mix up, and can our tomatoes as well (we've been trying to ripen the last of them in the house). We will be turning them into sauce this season. We don't ever get enough at one time to make it worth canning, so we freeze them in gallon bags as they become ripe throughout the season, and just can them at the end of harvest. This also makes it very easy to skin them. After freezing them, you just thaw them in mildly hot water and the skins pop right off. Much easier and faster then our old method of blanching them while fresh, and then freezing.

The few toms that didn't ripen up and are still green will get mixed with some peppers and made into salsa Verdi, and then get canned in half pints.
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#64 wildedibles

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Posted 03 October 2015 - 02:30 AM

:) yes we freze our tomatoes too we canned them last year when they were all ripe and froze just defrost to skin gotta love that
This year we are leaving them frozen just take a bag out when needed

The black is just looks a friend learned the hard way that starch turns black in the dryer its like when apples brown while drying if anyone has this problem dip them in lemon juice i think this works for the taters too but they do taste like lemons not really good for augratin potatoes lol

Im getting to my whole dill pickels tomrow the cucumbers are keeping very well and i cannot believe these tomatoes of mine very red ripened in the house to maximise yeild ;) but they r still very firm the ones in stores right now r soft one finger dents them i am surprised how well they are keeping :)
It helps to harvest when things are dry last year was so wet lots went moldy from the dampness all the time
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#65 wildedibles

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Posted 03 October 2015 - 02:39 AM

My friends garden had sixteen bonnys best tomatoes heirloom they r like a hot house tomato nice sandwich slicer :) anyway there was two other tomatoes that came up from the compost i think i would have good chance these tomatoe seeds will be more like bonnys best hoping anyway i should have pulled out the other tomatoes but i cannot pull out a free food plant :)

Haha my friend was surprisedche had so many potatoes he didnt plant this year but he had some lats year that he left little ones in ther gotta love free food hehe they messed up his perfect rows tho lol i learned peas and potatoes grow well together :)
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#66 Cybilopsin

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 08:33 PM

 we still have to source some soil, as what we have here is a blend of rock, glacial silt, and volcanic ash.

 

Can you explain this a bit further? I'm a relative newb w/r/t soil and gardening but it seems to me that the substances you describe are various forms of minerals. With the addition of a bit of organic matter to retain moisture and feed the soil food web, you should have something perfect for plants roots, no? "Glacial silt" and "volcanic ash" especially sound like some great ingredients for a well-textured, fertile soil to my inexperienced mind.

 

Indeed, in the pics of your outdoor beds it looks like plenty of grassy plants (perhaps sedges) are happily growing away in the local soil. If sedges, why not veggies? Not meaning to attack your intelligence here, just want to increase mine.

 

Any locals you know trying to grow in the local soil? Maybe after a few years of cover cropping, green manure, sheet mulching etc to add organic matter content?


Edited by Cybilopsin, 06 November 2015 - 08:36 PM.

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#67 Juthro

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 09:33 PM

No worries Cybil, I am happy to share. And I am admittedly fairly new to growing in this area, so I am learning as I go. Yes many types of grasses and other plants do grow well here, lots of wild rose, lupine, and wild geranium make up most of the natural ground cover along side the grasses.

But the soil is more like old river bottom, mostly 3/4" to 2" rock (lots of cool agates!) in a light mix of glacial silt that is very similar to a fine sandy loam. But there is not much in the way of organic material in the soil at all. This makes it very difficult to work in. Imagine trying to plant your garden in a rock path or driveway. That and raised beds or green house growing is almost required here, due to the short grow season, that way your soil temp comes up faster to get things growing.

For composting, you really need to hot compost, as the long winter and cool summer weather (our average high temps in Aug is about 63*F) make 'standard' composting difficult.

Please feel free to ask more if I didn't answer your questions. I love to talk about growing stuff.
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#68 Cybilopsin

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 10:09 PM

No, you nailed my questions. Wicked interesting, as I'm very intrigued by the kinds of multi-stage site-modification processes popularized by the permaculture movement. The "Greening the desert" video with Geoff Lawton, for example. Start with a problematic situation, import some well-chosen resources (including the right plant species), do a lot of work to build something clever at the beginning and then score the payoff from the downhill movement of the whole system as your transformations becomes permanent and self-sustaining.

 

The main issue with that approach is it can require a truly expert understanding of the fine details that characterize different places. Informed observation of what is there is always a major hurdle.

 

Whats interesting is your mix of small rocks in a light silt reminds me a bit of the things like Rocklite used in hydroponics. Probably extremely well-draining (unless the water table is high). I imagine certain plants can anchor their roots in there quite well.

 

Are you aware of anything that people use as a "green manure" crop in the local soil? I'm imagining something that germinates readily from seed and grows rapidly to smother competing weeds. That way you wouldn't have to work the soil too much, just scatter the seeds at the right time and reap a huge amount of organic matter at the end of the season (which as you said you'd need to pile up and hot-compost, not simply chop-and-drop where it grows). If there was one good plant that fulfilled these requirements, I imagine the local gardeners would already know about it.


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#69 Juthro

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 10:30 PM

I defiantly have had a learning curve trying to make things grow here. It is quite different from what I was used to in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.

So far my biggest challenge has been choosing the right plants. In the last three years I have certainly found some, and ruled out other, kinds of plants that can deal with the dramatic change in light cycle. I have found a lot of plants are receiving to many hours of light late in our grow season, and don't start to flower, or fruit until the season is to far along for them to mature before the first frost comes.

I am not aware for any use of cover crop or green manure type growing here, but with all the local sea food processing, you can get well composted fish/seafood by the ton for very reasonable prices. But so far I have avoided that, due to fact the smell (though not very strong) is prone to attract bears.

chomp.jpg

Edited by Juthro, 06 November 2015 - 10:33 PM.


#70 Cybilopsin

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 03:49 PM

I don't blame you for that. Bears are scary. Especially if they came around looking for some fish that turned out to just be a pile of rotten fish-compost. Then they'd be hungry. And pissed off.


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#71 Juthro

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 04:23 PM

Lol. Agreed, my neighbors raise a lot of poultry. Chickens, ducks, turkeys, and geese. I think that is plenty enough bear bait in the neighborhood.


Though bears and moose don't get along, and bears tend to hang out where the moose is not, and vise versa. We are in a more moose populated area. While that means less bears, moose are not the gardeners friend.
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#72 Juthro

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 07:32 PM

So as not to clutter anyone else's thread, I'll post this here.

My wife, and I are doing some experimentation this season. We modified some crude raised bed / green houses for our garden. We had good luck with these last year for tomato's, so this season we made some changes, and built another four 4' X 8' X 6" tall raised beds. And then scabbed in frames, complete with poly panel roofs that drain to rain barrels for watering (our well water is about 36*F year round, and the plants don't like the shock)

They actually work well for keeping the birds and moose out of our garden as well.

So far in our garden here, we've been able to grow as many (or more) carrots and potato's as we can eat in a year, so now we are looking to expand on tomato's in hopes of reaching that goal as well. But they need some shelter from our coastal wind, and a little bit of greenhouse effect to make the season long enough to fully ripen their fruit.

We also have broccoli, lettuce, carrots, several kinds of beans, bok choy, celery, and peppers planted outside. I'm sure I've forgotten some, but you get the idea.

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#73 wildedibles

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 01:26 AM

I love that idea for easy venting :) thing with covering plants with poly all summer is they can get too hot venting is essential :) good job buddy :)
Me and my garden budddy here are planning a cold frame for tomatoes coming this spring we want a triangle idea cause my friend gets lots of wind ...its blown over every tent he has set up even anchoring it into the ground with rebar didnt work dragged a cement block or two too its a really bad wind zone.........triangle like a roof would let the wind up and over instead of blowing on a flat wall ;)
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#74 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 08:15 AM

greatness :)   coming along real nice.

 

Im installing irrigation in my garden finally.

 

 

Doing some pipe math, I needa get a pressure gauge to see what my lines are looking like....


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#75 Juthro

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 02:07 PM

Thanks for checking in WildE, and Il1 :) The mini green houses are working well. Haven't even had any moose or rabbit (actually they are arctic hare's around here) penitrations yet. (knocks on wood)

I've been neglectful on taking pics, and keeping this thread updated, but the garden is growing well.


I'll try and get a couple of pic posted sometime this week.

Good grow vibes to all
Juth
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#76 wildedibles

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 03:37 AM

Im glad your mini greenhouse idea is keeping the kritters out too its a way that doesnt hurt them either perfect :)

My Dad is having issues with deer eating his flowers ....Mom is trying to help him out with a flower garden that deer do not like ....I think he has more shade there too so its gonna be fun picking out flowers that the deer wont eat .....they just chomped the tops off his fav roses ..........I was thinking Irises and hostas...??

Edited by wildedibles, 22 June 2016 - 03:38 AM.

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#77 Juthro

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 10:12 PM

I have watched deer eat to the ground several things that I was told they wouldn't eat, lol.

If you find something they really wont eat, let me know please :)

I am fairly convinced that the more you value a plant, the tastier they think it is.

Edited by Juthro, 22 June 2016 - 10:13 PM.

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#78 wildedibles

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 11:54 PM

I heard that the deer wont eat Iris because they are poisonous?? I am not certian if my Dad likes them tho??
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#79 Juthro

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 01:10 AM

I don't think they like it much, but I've seen them eat Iris before. But usually not very much, and then they move on to something that tastes better to them.
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#80 PsyBearknot

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 07:15 AM

So as not to clutter anyone else's thread, I'll post this here.My wife, and I are doing some experimentation this season. We modified some crude raised bed / green houses for our garden. We had good luck with these last year for tomato's, so this season we made some changes, and built another four 4' X 8' X 6" tall raised beds. And then scabbed in frames, complete with poly panel roofs that drain to rain barrels for watering (our well water is about 36*F year round, and the plants don't like the shock)They actually work well for keeping the birds and moose out of our garden as well.So far in our garden here, we've been able to grow as many (or more) carrots and potato's as we can eat in a year, so now we are looking to expand on tomato's in hopes of reaching that goal as well. But they need some shelter from our coastal wind, and a little bit of greenhouse effect to make the season long enough to fully ripen their fruit.We also have broccoli, lettuce, carrots, several kinds of beans, bok choy, celery, and peppers planted outside. I'm sure I've forgotten some, but you get the idea.


Love the idea that they drain into a rain barrel!
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