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Microbe's Oat Prep Tek


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#41 Microbe

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Posted 30 May 2015 - 08:57 AM

Cool now I see , I like using the dry air also as using an air stone gives me the heebie geebies with all that excess moisture. I just cut a myco filter about the size of a quarter and replace the filter on the underside of the 127 gph pump spliced two ways for each bin. Im looking forward to the results. I dont see many pple going this route and some say its trouble but it just took a bit of tweaking on my end and once its right, its fully automated. Probably not feesable for more than a few tubs thpugh. Also, Ive seen cubes grow well with minimal air exchange also but its not really ideal. I love using my automated setup.

Edit... Interesting. I never thought it would be able to support that many substrates. I'll be interested in the end result :cool:

I have enough ports to to run 32 bags with single airlines(hosebarb/luerlock fitting with needle tip attached and poked through the bag) or 16 monotubs with dual lines while being able to cycle the air complelty in less then 15 minutes of run time. I have plenty of output coming from my pump to add more ports and could run 250+ bags or 64 monos but this would have my pump running 24 hours a day.

As far as trouble, I can keep it clean looking and cable tie all my lines and even use black airline to match my shelving units(which i did). Is it required, probably not and i just had a decent tub using just a fan circulating the air and while my tubs had 6 1" holes in them covered with eazyfelt and micropore tape, i still felt i had some opportunity with FAE.

I believe fae is so freaking critical and of we can have more precise control over it, we can improve our results slightly. We need greater evaporation pre pinning and then less while the fruits are maturing. I really dont care if my substrate dries out as i will dunk it after it flushes but the more FAE you can provide and without drying the sub out before it flushes, the better the crop will perform. I know a fan has at least a high or low setting and we can layer on tape or add more holes, point the fan a little more directly or indirectly at the tubs, and etc. I simply would like to just set my timer and walk away no matter what speices or strain im working with. Its kind of like a greenhouse with versatility.

I originally wanted to go back to my pump because of the .5 micron filter patch bags i am going to fruit in. These filters are top of the line IMO and man alive nothing is getting in or out very easily.

I will share once i get it set up. And oh yeah, im still using only a single outlet as a fan would.....

Edited by Microbe77, 30 May 2015 - 12:30 PM.

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#42 Microbe

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Posted 30 May 2015 - 12:31 PM

I've been using the steep tek for years for my WBS.
I know it worked good when I added some left over oats to my WBS and steeped it, but I have yet to try oats all by themselves.

It works great on oats, at least for me anyway. Assuming i follow CUE's steep tek, didnt know ot was Cue's but was the one who informed me of it, anyway we probably agree on the level of hydration of the grains so im certain you will like how the whole oats turn or turned out.

That dang CUE taught me the steep method when i boiled some water and soaked my grains in it for 24 hours. Took the lid off and i about threw up. CUE replied that it was 22 hours to long, boom i learned the steep tek and havent looked back. If someone runs into CUE thank him for me would ya?

Edited by Microbe77, 30 May 2015 - 12:40 PM.


#43 Cue

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Posted 30 May 2015 - 04:57 PM

Violet also did a great right up about how she steeped RGS on another site a couple of years ago.

I think it was titled something like "The Glory of Grass Seed".

But with her RGS did a very long soak with a very long drain. Exactly how long I honestly can't remember.

 

I wish that we were allowed to link other sites.


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#44 Cue

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 03:07 AM

Dang you and that steep tek.

My jars are colonizing too fast.

In a week from from inoculating with spore solution some of my jars are 100% colonized making shaking them a bitch. I wanted to wait a week to get any possible mold to germinate, so it will show up after the shake.

 

Plus, I've had to move all 40 quarts to a cooler room, since its going to be almost 2 weeks before I can around to spawning them. Since, I'm still working on getting my LK jars spawned.


Edited by Pastafarian, 01 June 2015 - 03:12 AM.

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#45 CatsAndBats

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 06:26 AM

good problems to have
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#46 TurkeyRanch

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 08:24 AM

Violet also did a great right up about how she steeped RGS on another site a couple of years ago.
I think it was titled something like "The Glory of Grass Seed".
But with her RGS did a very long soak with a very long drain. Exactly how long I honestly can't remember.

I wish that we were allowed to link other sites.

Why do we need to link to that site to learn how to soak grain? A simple search will turn up a ton of threads on grain prep, here and there. It's just soaking grain, it's not hard. . .

1. Rinse and add water to grain.

2. Wait.

3. When grain is hydrated, drain.

Edited by TurkeyRanch, 01 June 2015 - 08:26 AM.


#47 Microbe

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 06:28 PM


This is a copy and paste by  Penn State Extension on spawn production. Good info here if someone is getting acclimated to spawn production.


Mushrooms

Spawn Production


The process of making spawn remains much the same as what Dr. Sinden first developed. The grain is mixed with a little calcium carbonate, then cooked, sterilized and the cooled. Small pieces of pure culture mycelium are placed in small batches of the grain. Once the small batch is fully colonized, it is used to further inoculate several larger batches of grain. This multiplying of the inoculated grain continues until the commercial size containers, usually a plastic bag with a breathable filter patch, are inoculated. During the colonization of each batch the containers are shaken every few days to further distribute the mycelium around. Temperatures are maintained where the mycelium is growing in a range of 75-76F . Uniformity of the air circulating around the bags is important to insure that all containers are keep at the desired temperature range. The mycelium is sensitive and its fruiting mechanism can be easily damaged at high temperatures.

Spawning

Before the spawning operation, attempts may be made to improve the substrate moisture. Sometimes water is applied or an pesticide application may be made. Farms with a historical problem of mummy disease may avoid water applications at spawning, because the free water improves conditions for the bacteria to reproduce and spread, thereby increasing the incidence of this disease. On bed farms spawn and supplement is broadcast over the surface of the substrate. Uniformity of the distribution is critical to achieve an even distribution and more even spawn growth and temperatures. On tray or bulk farms, spawn is usually metered into the substrate during the mixing operation. Some growers will bring the spawn brought to room temperature before mixing it into the substrate. Gypsum (1-2% of substrate dry wt.) can be added if substrate that is wet, little greasy and/or not completely conditioned. 

Historically, three methods of spawning have been used. However, on most commercial farms the "Through Mixing" method prevails. "Broadcast" and "Ruffling In" spawning were the other two methods. Broadcast spawning consisted of covering the substrate surface with spawn. Whereas "Ruffling In' included the scratching the spawn into the top few inches of substrate. 

"Through Mixing" spawning has many advantages over the other methods. Research has shown there are increases in yield. Because the mycelium does not have to grow far to colonize substrate, it reduces spawn-growing time, which is important because spawned substrate is exposed to various types of infection. Another advantage is that spawn grains act as supplemental nutrients for the mushroom mycelium. With through mixing spawning it is important that substrate must be cooled throughout the bed before spawning. 

Spawning is the cleanest operation performed on a mushroom farm. All equipment, baskets, tools, etc. should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected before spawning. Normally it is the first operation of the day when personnel have not been into any of the older houses. After spawning, the beds should be covered with plastic to protect the freshly spawned substrate from air borne contaminants and pest. Unfortunately, for any contaminants present before covering, the moist environment provides ideal conditions for germination and growth. Plastic sheeting is sometimes used to cover the substrate to help maintain substrate moisture.

How Much Spawn?

The amount of spawn used depends on the crop cycle and cost. The spawning rate can be expressed as a unit or quart per so many square feet of bed surface; 1 unit (~ 1 lb or 1 liter) per 6-8 ft. is considered a standard rate on a commercial farm. The rate is sometimes expressed based on spawn weight versus substrate weight; therefore, 2-3 percent spawning rate is equivalent rate. A low spawning rate is about 1 unit for every 12-15 sq. ft. (1-2% Dry Weight), whereas a high rate about 1 unit for every 4-5 sq. ft (>3% of Compost Dry Weight). The more spawn used the better, since it is a cheap supplement, increasing overall production; and the more initial growing points will provide a quicker and more efficient use of substrate nutrients. Both of these factors will improve the colonization of substrate, which also helps insure the mushroom will grow quicker than other fungal competitors. Furthermore, as the spawn rate is increased, more heat is generated and the heat surge occurs earlier during spawn growing period.

Spawn Growth

During the colonization of the substrate by the spawn (spawn run) is a good time to evaluate the crop and substrate. Spawn growth and the presence or absence of other molds helps to indicate how the substrate preparation process has been carried out. Problems with substrate formulation or process and Phase II composting or conditioning may first develop during the spawn-growing period. Weed and indicators molds may tell the grower how the composting process went and what nutrient was lacking or in excess. These molds may grow on compounds that have not been used by the microbes during the Phase II will often suggest a problem occurred.

Although the type of spawn growth depends on many factors, often it may indicate the nutritional and moisture level of the substrate. The spawn strain itself will vary in their inherent capacity for rapid or slow growth. This variation is a genetic characteristic; therefore, growers should be familiar with the characteristics of the different strains and the suppliers of spawn are a good source of this information. The other obvious important factor that determines the type of spawn growth is the substrate. Substrate element analysis is important but does not always correlate with growth or yield but should be monitored to determine trends in substrate preparation. The lab analysis should be used as guidelines and establishing trends from crop to crop.

There is a direct correlation between substrate ammonia content and subsequent growth and yield of mushrooms. Substrate should have less that 0.05% ammonia, dry weight, at spawning time. By smelling, most growers can detect 0.1% ammonia levels, which will restrict spawn growth. Ammonia content above 0.2% will kill spawn. The substrate pH has little to no correlation to spawn growth or yield. Spawn can tolerate a pH in the range of 6.5 to 8.2 and normally it will decreases from 7.5 to 6.0 during cropping. When the substrate nitrogen content is analyzed at this time, it should be in a range of 2.0 - 2.5% on a dry weight basis. A positive correlation of substrate nitrogen and yield has been shown. The greater the nitrogen content, with no ammonia, the better the yield. Nitrogen content has no correlation with spawn growth, since rapid spawn growth has been observed in both high and low nitrogen composts. However, generally a high nitrogen substrate has a slower spawn growth, but fills out and becomes denser. The lipid (fats/oils) content of the substrate will influence both the rate and quantity of spawn growth. More nutritional substrate will support slower and finer texture spawn growth. It is suspected that the thinner strands of spawn are slowly adsorbing nutrients. In less nutritional substrate, spawn growth is more rapid and white with more rhizomorphs, suggesting the spawn is seeking nutrients. 

Ideal substrate moisture at spawning varies according to the type of substrate. With horse manure substrate, moisture of 65-72% is normal. With synthetic composts a moisture range of 65-75% is normal. However, there are exceptions to these ranges where spawn growth and yield are better outside these ranges. Mushroom size and quality is affected directly by dry substrate, where dry substrate will produce smaller, off-color mushrooms.

Ventilation and environmental requirements for substrate are not well understood. It is assumed that little oxygen is required within the substrate. Carbon dioxide levels are kept high within the room or at least under the plastic that is used to cover the substrate after spawning. It is known that there is an increased spawn growth rate with increasing CO2 levels to 10,000 ppm. The desired relative humidity is 95% or more in order to preserve substrate moisture. Relative humidity within the room can be maintained by watering the walls and floors. Some high-pressure misting systems have been developed, but they are expensive to purchase and maintain. Steam can also be used to maintain humidity, however it is a source of heat and would increase energy cost and put more demands on the air conditioning system.

During the spawn-growing period, little outside ventilation is used, unless outside air is used as a supplemental source of cooling. During the warmer months outside air is not used, and the room air is re-circulated through the air conditioning units to be cooled. The higher humidity of the outside air requires more cooling capacity. 
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#48 truMushrooms

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 01:06 AM

Cool thread microbe, enjoyed reading it. I've never put my grains in steeping bags like you have but I think it would help greatly with the steps involved such as rinsing, drying and removing from the water once hydrated. It's a bit messy when doing it the conventional way. 

I've got some laundry mesh bags I bought for pasteurization runs that I might be able to use for grain, I'll have to check how tightly knit it is because the spacing might be too big for grains. 

Cheers buddy, keep on shroomin! 


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#49 Heirloom

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 11:09 AM

I agree tru, a bag to steep in is a lot easier than just using a pot of water, keeps the area clean. Once in a while I have spilled it draining , no more of that problem.


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#50 Microbe

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 05:52 PM

I was running a little low on WBS so I bought a bag of Oats to add to it so I would have enough for a large jar run.
50# bag of racing horse whole (they also had cracked) oats cost $14.95.
Better than paying almost $20.00 for a 40# bag of WBS, especially since the oats expand more.

I currently have 42 quarts of 50/50 wbs/oats inocculated with Texas Yellow Cap Cubensis, and I still have grain left over (ran out of jars) destined for the freezer. Where as, usually I would have not gotten more than 35 jars out of what seems to be the same amount of pure WBS.

I didn't use any pickling lime or even rinse the grain and I still didn't have any clumping issues even when I left one run to cool over night in the PC.

Next Cubensis jar run will be 100% Oats done with Cue's steep tek.

Hopefully everything will work out good, so I will be able to try the oats with Pans later this summer.

Did you ever try pans and oats?
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#51 Cue

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 04:53 AM

 

Did you ever try pans and oats?

I have not tried Pans on oats.

I'm recently found that squirrels like oats, so I may now avoid using oats.


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