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Wilde's hunting adventures 2015


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#41 wildedibles

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Posted 30 June 2017 - 03:33 AM

Here is a few from the poop pile

 

gallery_121976_1524_725821.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_5896.jpgI

I like how gold they become in the sun 

gallery_121976_1524_1416079.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_44155.jpg

The stem does not bruise

gallery_121976_1524_29828.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_41591.jpg

The gills have a white rim ....they start gray and turn black ....molted 


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#42 wildedibles

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Posted 30 June 2017 - 04:01 AM

The poop pile mushrooms are
https://en.m.wikiped...s_papilionaceus

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Panaeolus papilionaceus
Panaeolus papilionaceus
2011-08-31 Panaeolus papilionaceus (Bull.) Quél 183735.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Bolbitiaceae
Genus: Panaeolus
Species: P. papilionaceus
Binomial name
Panaeolus papilionaceus
(Bull. ex Fries) Quélet
Panaeolus-papilionaceus-var.-papilionaceus-range-map.png
Approximate range of Panaeolus papilionaceus var. papilionaceus
Synonyms
Agaricus calosus
Agaricus campanulatus
Agaricus papilionaceus
Galerula campanulata
Panaeolus campanulatus
Panaeolus retirugis
Panaeolus sphinctrinus

Panaeolus papilionaceus, also known as Agaricus calosus, Panaeolus campanulatus, Panaeolus retirugis, and Panaeolus sphinctrinus, and commonly known as Petticoat mottlegill, is a very common and widely distributed little brown mushroom that feeds on dung.

Panaeolus papilionaceus
View the Mycomorphbox template that generates the following listMycological characteristics
gills on hymenium
cap is convex
hymenium is adnexed
stipe is bare
spore print is black
ecology is saprotrophic
edibility: edible
This mushroom is the type species for the genus Panaeolus.

Contents
Description Edit

Cap: 1 – 5 cm across, obtusely conic, grayish brown, not hygrophanous, becoming campanulate in age, margin adorned with white toothlike partial veil fragments when young, flesh thin.
Gills: adnate to adnexed close to crowded, one or two tiers of intermediate gills, pale gray, acquiring a mottled, blackish appearance in age, with whitish edges.
Spores: 12 - 18 x 7-10 µm, elliptical, smooth, with an apical pore, spore print black.
Stipe: 6 – 12 cm by 2 – 4 mm, gray-brown, darker where handled, paler toward the apex, fibrous and pruinose.
Odor: Mild.
Taste: Unappetizing.
Microscopic features: Basidia 4-sterigmate; abruptly clavate. Cheilocystidia abundant; subcylindric, often subcapitate or capitate.
Habitat and formation Edit

Occurring singly, gregariously, or caespitosely on cow/horse dung, moose droppings, and in pastures. Widely distributed in North America in Spring, Summer, and Fall and through the Winter in warmer climates. It can be found in countries including[1] Canada (Alberta,[2] British Columbia), the United States (Alabama, Alaska, California,[2] Colorado, Florida, Georgia,[2] Indiana,[2] Louisiana,[2] Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana,[2] New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Texas,[2] Washington,[2]), the Caribbean (Bahamas, Cuba, San Vincent Island), Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, France, The Netherlands, Macedonia, Mexico,[2] Norway, Slovenia,[2] South Africa, Uganda, China, Iran, Lithuania, Kuwait, and the Philippines.

Edibility Edit

Panaeolus papilionaceus is edible, however it is neither choice in flavor nor substantial in mass. While similar looking species, such as Panaeolus cinctulus, do contain psilocybin, Panaeolus papilionaceus does not.

Gallery Edit


Panaeolus papilionaceus var. papilionaceus


Panaeolus sphinctrinus - Lindsey.jpg

Panaeolus.sphinctrinus2.-.lindsey.jpg

Panaeolus sphinctrinus 20080913w.JPG

Panaeolus.papilionaceus3.-.lindsey.jpg
See also Edit

List of Panaeolus species
References Edit

^ Worldwide Distribution of Neurotropic Fungi, Guzman (www.museocivico.rovereto.tn.it)
^ a b c d e f g h i j Panaeolus papilionaceus The Mushroom Observer (mushroomobserver.org)]
External links Edit

Mushroom Expert - Panaeolus papilionaceus
Mykoweb - Panaeolus papilionaceus
Observations on Mushroom Observer
Last edited 7 months ago by Plantdrew
RELATED ARTICLES
Panaeolus acuminatus
species of fungus
Panaeolus africanus
Panaeolus antillarum
Wikipedia

Content is available under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted.
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Here's a page from mushroom expert
http://www.mushroome...ilionaceus.html

"
Major Groups > Gilled Mushrooms > Dark-Spored > Panaeolus > Panaeolus papilionaceus
MushroomExpert.Com

Panaeolus papilionaceus

[ Basidiomycetes > Agaricales > Bolbitiaceae > Panaeolus . . . ]

by Michael Kuo

Panaeolus papilionaceus is a "coprophilous" mushroom, which is nice way of saying it grows on, um, dung (primarily that of horses and cows) or in soil that has been enriched with equine or bovine blessings. Aside from the habitat, identifying features include the black spore print; the gills, which are mottled gray and black; the tiny white partial veil fragments that hang like little teeth from the edge of the cap; the absence of a ring on the stem; and microscopic features (see below).

Description:

Ecology: Saprobic; growing alone to gregariously in the dung of horses and cows; common; widely distributed in North America; spring, summer, and fall (and over winter in warmer climates).

Cap: 1-5 cm; obtusely conical to bell shaped or nearly spherical when young, expanding slightly (often to broadly bell-shaped) with age; dry; smooth to silky when young, often becoming finely hairy or prominently cracked with age; sometimes with a reticulate network of raised ridges; whitish, gray, brownish, brown, or reddish brown; sometimes developing olive discolorations; the margin hung with white, toothlike partial veil fragments, at least when young (check this feature in the field, since the fragments are easily shed in collection bags).

Gills: Attached to the stem, or pulling away from it with maturity; close or crowded; grayish when young, but soon developing black areas and acquiring a mottled appearance; eventually black overall; with whitish edges.

Stem: 4-16 cm long; up to 5 mm thick; more or less equal; finely hairy; often brittle; colored more or less like the cap, but paler at the apex and darkening or turning reddish toward the base with maturity or on handling.

Flesh: Insubstantial.

Spore Print: Black or blackish.

Chemical Reactions: KOH on cap surface dull orangish.

Microscopic Features: Spores 11-18.5 x 7.5-12 µ; more or less elliptical, with a pore; smooth; dextrinoid; not discoloring in concentrated sulphuric acid. Basidia 4-sterigmate; abruptly clavate. Pleurocystidia absent. Cheilocystidia abundant; subcylindric, often subcapitate or capitate. Pileipellis an epithelium, often featuring pileocystidia.

Panaeolus campanulatus, Panaeolus retirugis, and Panaeolus sphinctrinus are all synonyms; they represent taxa formerly considered distinct; I have included their morphological differences in the broad description above.

REFERENCES: (Bulliard, 1781) Quélet, 1872. (Fries, 1821; Saccardo, 1887; Kauffman, 1918; Stamets, 1978; Smith, Smith & Weber, 1979; Arora, 1986; Phillips, 1991/2005; Lincoff, 1992; Metzler & Metzler, 1992; Barron, 1999; McNeil, 2006; Miller & Miller, 2006.) Herb. Kuo 07180204, 04160601.

Further Online Information:

Panaeolus papilionaceus at MykoWeb
Panaeolus campanulatus at Roger's Mushrooms
Panaeolus retirugis at Roger's Mushrooms
Panaeolus sphinctrinus at Roger's Mushrooms





Panaeolus papilionaceus

Panaeolus papilionaceus

Panaeolus papilionaceus

Panaeolus papilionaceus

Panaeolus papilionaceus

Panaeolus papilionaceus
Cheilocystidia

Panaeolus papilionaceus
Pileipellis


Cite this page as:

Kuo, M. (2007, February). Panaeolus papilionaceus. Retrieved from the MushroomExpert.Com Web site: http://www.mushroome...ilionaceus.html


© MushroomExpert.Com"

These are not magic but I havent been able to find out if they contain chemicals like 5HTP which is great for fribromilagia and headaches/migraines

#43 wildedibles

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 06:16 AM

Dryad saddle

https://en.wikipedia...porus_squamosus

 

gallery_121976_1524_75845.jpg

 

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These are a little mature to eat but I found a few young ones earlier that were nice fried up in a stir fry :)


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#44 Arathu

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 08:58 AM

We have those by thousands here. Actually we got some on agar now but as much as they grow here wild I don't know if it worth cultivating..............

 

Cool mushroom..smells like cucumbers to me.........

 

A


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#45 wildedibles

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 02:04 PM

They like in town areas too I found one a few years ago on a stump in the parking lot of McD... lol at least it was something I could eat :) we went out just after the rains and there was nothing but Jelly mushies almost done with the pictures ...some hardwood witches butter and soft wood stuff too and some ear jelly :) I showed my oldest son and he was amazed how much these things look like ears :)

#46 wildedibles

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 05:21 PM

Cantharellus cibarius :) isnt in North America so ....re-naming and DNA testing is happing I guess ....."they"
are looking for collections and help to find which cantharellus grow in North America and where :)

I took pictures but a still having issues with loading them so while I wait I need to make some notes before I forget.........

.....trees that were around were Balsam, Birtch, spruce, popular and very few maple there is a few beech around as well.....there is a few spots and the first 4 trees are aundant in both areas.......lower area they are growing in moss / short grass.....the 2nd spot they r growing from the path no moss sandy area that is usually dry and the mushrooms here are usually buttns that dont do anything this year we have some small mushrooms with all the rain we have had ......Im spore printing them and gonna have a good look at the pictures before commenting on them .......I took pictures with a measuring tape to help with the sizes :)

http://www.mushroome...s_cibarius.html

this from the above link


" Major Groups > Chanterelles and Trumpets > Cantharellus "cibarius"
MushroomExpert.Com

Cantharellus "cibarius"

[ Basidiomycota > Cantharellales > Cantharellaceae > Cantharellus . . . ]

by Michael Kuo

The chanterelles grouped together here are usually fairly easy to spot; they are medium-sized or large, yellow to orange-yellow or orange mushrooms found in hardwood forests, featuring a broadly convex, flat, or shallowly depressed cap, a central and fleshy stem, and false gills on the underside of the cap. The mushrooms are also known for their fruity, apricot-like odor, best detected when you have several of them together in your collection bag or basket.

It is currently unclear how many species of Cantharellus in North America match the general description above. Until recently they were all lumped together in treatments of "Cantharellus cibarius," but recent research has made it clear that Cantharellus cibarius is a strictly European species. In western North America (that is, from the Rocky Mountains westward) there appears to be less diversity among the cibarius-like species; so far, anyway, only four species have been delineated with contemporary species concepts; see the key to chanterelles and trumpets, beginning with couplet #17. But in eastern North America, we may well be in for some changes. At the time of this writing (early 2015), two papers have begun to describe cibarius-like species from Texas (Buyck & Hofstetter, 2011) and from Wisconsin (Foltz and collaborators, 2013). These new eastern species can be found in the key to chanterelles and trumpets, beginning with couplet #44.

You Can Help!

Many more species are likely to be discovered--perhaps in the west, but almost certainly in the east. Mycology needs your help in the effort to document, describe, and name the cibarius-like chanterelles on our continent. If you are like me, your chanterelle collections over the years have not exactly been made with science in mind. But I am turning over a new leaf, and I hope you'll join me. Please see the pages on collecting mushrooms for study, making spore prints, and describing mushrooms, along with the page for preserving specimens. These pages provide the basics for documenting collections. But the recently published Cantharellus papers have made it clear that, if we want to be able to tell our chanterelle species apart, we are going to need to pay attention to some features we are not used to observing for chanterelles, so I am drawing your attention to them here:

Spore Print Color. The Foltz paper used DNA sequencing to identify three separate cibarius-like species growing within 65 feet of one another in Wisconsin. The authors determined that each species had a different spore print color. The authors of the Texas paper, however, did not document spore print color for one species, and for the other they only managed to obtain very thin spore prints that looked more or less whitish--but any chanterelle spore print can look whitish if it is not thick. When recording the color of a chanterelle spore print, be sure to hold the print in good light, and view it from an oblique angle. The colors recorded for North American cibarius-like species, so far, include white, creamy, yellow, pinkish, and deep pinkish (salmon).

Color of False Gills. The Foltz paper also used the color of the false gills to help separate species. This color is subject to potential change over the course of the chanterelle's development; for example, the whitish young false gills of Cantharellus phasmatis develop pink shades as the spores mature. The color of the false gills can be difficult to assess, and even more difficult to photograph. "Pink" in mushroom mycology is not always as, well, pink as one might think. I recommend making the observation in good, natural light, and holding the mushroom at various angles before deciding.

Mycorrhizal Association. The precise extent to which chanterelles are mycorrhizal specialists is not yet known. For this reason it would be a good idea to document any tree within "toppling range" (the distance from which, if the tree were to fall over, it could potentially hit the mushroom) with as much precision as possible. It is entirely possible that some species of cibarius-like chanterelles are associated with a limited number of hosts, which might help in their identification.

Reaction to Iron Salts. Although neither the Foltz paper nor the Buyck paper documents the reaction of the various newly named species to iron salts, at least two North American Cantharellus species have distinctive reactions (red for Cantharellus appalachiensis and olive for Cantharellus roseocanus). And, over the years, I have found the cibarius-like collections I've made to vary in reaction from negative to dark gray--but this was while I was conceiving of them as a single species. Perhaps the difference between negative and gray will turn out to be informative in some situations. (Iron salts can be purchased easily at Amazon or elsewhere; search "feso4.")

Basic Morphology. Aside from the special details above, of course, the basic proportions, colors, measurements (width of the cap, length and width of the stem), and so on should all be recorded and photographed. Good photos are especially important with chanterelles, because the features that separate them are likely to be easily assessed only when the mushrooms are fresh; microscopic features, which can be observed from dried specimens, are only occasionally useful with this group of species.

Robust, well-documented, well-dried collections of cibarius-like chanterelles are essential to figuring out what our chanterelle species are. If you (or your mycological society) are interested in helping, I urge you to make such collections and donate them, along with supporting documentation and photgraphs, to a public herbarium. If you would like help figuring out the process, or selecting a herbarium, feel free to contact me!


REFERENCES: Fries, 1821; Coker, 1919; Smith, 1968; Bigelow, 1978; Petersen, 1979; Smith, Smith & Weber, 1981; Weber & Smith, 1985; Lincoff, 1992; Metzler & Metzler, 1992; Horn, Kay & Abel, 1993; Barron, 1999; Roody, 2003; McNeil, 2006; Kuo, 2007; Binion et al., 2008; Buyck & Hofstetter, 2011; Foltz et al., 2013; Kuo & Methven, 2014. Herb. Kuo 06249402, 06130206, 07220303, 07220305, 07180702, 07011101, 07121101, 07141102.

© MushroomExpert.Com

Cite this page as:

Kuo, M. (2015, March). Cantharellus "cibarius." Retrieved from the MushroomExpert.Com Web site: http://www.mushroome..._cibarius.html"

#47 wildedibles

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 09:23 AM

I found these last year they are just starting to come out now ....the seasons are a little messed up here not yearly not late but not on time either ?? lol

 

gallery_121976_1524_519961.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_713432.jpg

 

notice the blue feet on the smaller two in the top they have a white stem and the others have an orange / red stem......


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#48 Arathu

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 11:00 AM

Variable.....Mother Nature is variable and this keeps things from going stale................we and everything else swing with it but the water in us all tends to keep things pretty much stabilized.

 

I've learned that there isn't "a day" to go pick something there's a season.......she keeps us coming back that way...........

 

Nice pix lady.......... :biggrin:

 

A


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#49 wildedibles

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 11:02 AM

I have loaded a few pictures of a red staining mushroom need to add them in here ??.....

....The spore prints on the Cantharellus are all white I printed them on a plastic clear bag had them on the table look from the side as these lay a thin layer of spores prob every day till they are eaten or ....anyway held against a tissue and its white not cream .....need to katch up on pictures :) .......

....I agree there is seasons :) and areas to gather ....I find there is something every day if you look and I do follow dont take everything....I think about the person that wants to come look tomrow :) and share .......I dont like it when someone strips the berry bush I find one bush will give for a week on how it ripens ;)

Edited by wildedibles, 09 July 2017 - 11:05 AM.


#50 cubesRAbore

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 01:50 PM

My best guess on your red staining shroom pictures would be Lepiota flammeotincta.


Edited by cubesRAbore, 09 July 2017 - 01:50 PM.

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#51 wildedibles

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 04:14 PM

Great guess for not much info......there are only a handful of red staiiners out there :) So I googled red stainging mushroom and looked at some pictures.........

....I seen the Lepiota before and this one looked different ....I went outside and no more they were under my neighours big old white pine tree and there is oak beside this tree ....with that info too I found it to be blushing wood mushroom is the comon name and I have a few site's I wanna link so be right back with them......

Agaricus silvaticus (blushing wood mushroom)

http://www.first-nat...-silvaticus.php

https://en.m.wikiped...icus_silvaticus

mushroom expert had this one with a broken link to rogers mushroom with this name I think his was fron the west coast but he did mention oak as a friend tree ....really without DNA testing this one is a european species and maybe North American finds need a new name?? ayway I will get the pictures posted in here since I posted the info about it now :)

http://www.mushroome...ibrillosus.html

Thank you for the guess it was my first one too when I seen them out in the yard but with a little thought the scales are diiff and the shape of the mushrooms are different too .....I love the puzzle to solve :)

Edited by wildedibles, 09 July 2017 - 04:23 PM.

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#52 cubesRAbore

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 04:52 PM

Yep. I think your right on. I hadn't noticed the pic with the mature specimen with the dark gills.


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#53 wildedibles

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 09:42 PM

here is the pictures of my red staining mushroom

 

gallery_121976_1524_654202.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_325464.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_708463.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_557711.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_993879.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_984257.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_1040165.jpg


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#54 wildedibles

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 05:52 AM

Here was our last trip to the Reshi up the hill to see how its growing 

 

gallery_121976_1524_106883.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_66343.jpg

 

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You can still see the old one from last year

 

gallery_121976_1524_31426.jpg

now this log to the left was standing last time ?? wonder how it fell over ....did the rain do it??

 

gallery_121976_1524_3707.jpg

but by the way this log is all torn up me and hubby decided it was prob a bear looking for some grubs in that wood its all pulled out....

 

gallery_121976_1524_24868.jpg

Here is some jelly fungi its a type of tree ear growing on a balsam tree

 

gallery_121976_1524_4623.jpg

see how these r starting to look like ears ....they will get a bit bigger and then they have all the wrinkles and everything they really look like ears neat mushroom and its edible too ........say its good in soups and such...

 

gallery_121976_1524_69220.jpg

This is a type of witches butter but it grows on hardwood this being maple its also edible.....

 

gallery_121976_1524_41159.jpg

It looses its shape when it matures ....Jelly fungi do not eat wood tho they will eat a mushroom or its mycellia hidden within the wood so it makes these mushrooms harder to grow ....the jellies will go threw a yeast faze too I think this is when it starts growing on the other fungi........


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#55 wildedibles

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 05:59 AM

Here is another jelly fungi and it shows the mushroom it grows on or with or the mycillium of?? anyway here it is

gallery_121976_1524_81443.jpg

Its growing on a block of spruce ....soft wood instead of hard wood

these ones are dried up a bit they are the tiny hard chunks ...when I find some gooey stuff I will take a picture of it and see if I can get a picture of the fungi it grows on too

 

gallery_121976_1524_81443.jpg



#56 wildedibles

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 04:55 AM

Panaeolus papilionaceus

 

gallery_121976_1524_60673.jpg

^ growing in some thyme :) I just started it in this garden and its doing very well

gallery_121976_1524_759577.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_425876.jpg

nice close up of the veil not as clear as i would like but it shows them well

gallery_121976_1524_497058.jpg

^ molted gills

gallery_121976_1524_226363.jpg

^ Cap side showing the black spores

gallery_121976_1524_37473.jpg

^ this one is young and the mushroom is not fully open to show its skirt ;)

gallery_121976_1524_36520.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_22759.jpg

the veil remnants hanging off the cap is so pretty scalloped trim on a skirt :)

gallery_121976_1524_12978.jpg

they like the poop in my lettuce patch :) this was a little family of like 7

gallery_121976_1524_50378.jpg

this one has a gold color to it 

 

gallery_121976_1524_65733.jpg

 

Im thinking that the larger darker one is a diff mush?? the stem was pliable instead of brittle and a lot larger growing on poop too no bruising on any of these mushrooms


Edited by wildedibles, 11 July 2017 - 05:17 AM.

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#57 wildedibles

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 05:32 AM

Now I have a mystery mushroom troop in my yard, they look like tiny white dicks ....tiny under an inch here is some pictures now this could be classed as porn so viewer discre....lol sorry had too :)

 

 2017 06 28 was the date on these pictures and they are still growing the top is getting pink slightly lol making them look even more like the real thing ....I think its funny that there is like 50 of them growing :) under a ceader tree , balsam fir tree, maple and lots of mixed burried wood including ground hemlock so??

 

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they maybe growing out of the hardwood block??

 

gallery_121976_1524_73607.jpg

 

gallery_121976_1524_60953.jpg

see there is more too maybe growing out of the wood I will look again and see ...hum take a few more pictures they remind me of the dead man's fingers but white instead of black I see them growing in the woods right now too.....

 


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#58 cubesRAbore

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 06:40 AM

I bet it's a Clavaria spp.

Clavaria fumosa maybe.


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#59 wildedibles

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 10:14 AM

I bet it's a Clavaria spp.
Clavaria fumosa maybe.

:) Thank you very much for helping me guess

http://www.mushroome...ria_fumosa.html

ok Ive seen these before but I think I have something diff

1 - I think mine are hard not soft like a club fungi

2 - they come up as a group but not stuck together like club fungi tend to group together where mine come up as a single fungi

Im gonna take a new picture and maye cut one open or something cuz Ive never touched them they could be fragile and hollow but they look to me more solid like thoes dead mans fingers (have you seen these or know what Im talking about)?? see if I can link to what im talking about ;)

http://www.mushroome...polymorpha.html
there is dead mans finger fungi ;) Im gonna check out my mushrooms right now with a knife and a big doobie :)

They are hard ...cut one in half they have a hard white spounge inside something like a hard poly pore
I scratched off some white and its black inside ....they do have a pink tip but its hard to show that color difference on my camra.....and sometimes 2 grow connected to each other but uaually they come up single

http://www.mushroome...a_longiana.html

see what you think about that one ......the fruiting body definition says it starts white and turns black and is a small one found in eastern north america ......this next page is a lookalike from california and it shows a better picture
http://mykoweb.com/C..._hypoxylon.html

Edited by wildedibles, 11 July 2017 - 10:57 AM.


#60 cubesRAbore

cubesRAbore

    Mycophage

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 02:10 PM

There are lots of xylaria spp. and many are very hard to ID to species but they all grow directly from wood.

Dig some up! If they are all rooted into wood, they probably are xylaria. If not, then I'm still leaning towards a spp. of Clavaria.

I love a good mushroom mystery!! Maybe my friends and family are right about me being a mushroom geek.


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