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The Botanist Files V1.0


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#61 JanSteen

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 02:33 PM

The best time of year to order coca seeds, is whenever the temperature doesn't drop below 15 degrees C. Thats something in farenheit, but I am in no mood for any more conversions today.
You don't need heating mats if you germinate them indoors. Mine do well in any temperature between 15 C and 35 C. So room temperature would be fine.
Just try to make sure you have some live peat moss before you order seeds. You're going to need a patch of it for germination. It's best to have that before the seeds arrive, because time is of great essence. I've had seeds germinate after 60+ days, but the survival rate is absurdly low.

Something I've noticed, that would probably help the survival rate of these youngsters, is that directly after a root starts penetrating the husk, it's best to put the seeds in to the soil. Otherwise the plant will adjust to low-nutrient levels, and it will burn when you put it in a soil medium afterwards. The husk will drop off of the seedling on its own, but if it takes more than 2 weeks, it's best to operate with a fine scalpel and give it a hand. Coca seedlings have a very peculiar transparant-ish layer around the seed edge, which helps you find the area to slice. But lets not get ahead of that, the natural way will work just fine. I think I've described a soil mix, somewhere on these botanist files. The only addition I can make it to use 7% coco peat, and some clay. Other than that: peat, peat moss, and a dash of regular potting soil will do fine. pH should be around 5-6, not much higher. With that, I mean the actual pH of the soil. Watering should be done with the same pH, but if your soil is around 7, your plants will die. That's why the peat is so important. Basically the same principle as with blueberries. They just need acidic soil, otherwise their natural state doesn't allow proper nutrient uptake.

With all these things in mind, you'll be good to go.

@Spooner: that seems like a lot of back breaking work, but clay is good soil none the less. The Netherlands basically thrived on it; we pumped out the sea and marsh water, and when salt washed away, all we had left was clay. I reckon if you dig deeper, you'll find more condensed clay that doesn't fall apart that easily. But as I said; a normal soil transfer would do fine as well. We'll have to make do with whatever we can get! I'm the type that recycles every bucket of potting soil until there's no organic matter left, and then still feed it to the worms before throwing it out in the yard.
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#62 Heirloom

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 04:02 PM

Thank you, this is good info to know. I'll do some more research in this thread and others I recall from the past. I have been meaning to use metric measurements to make it easy for those not familiar with the measuring system I was born into , I like metric. I recall how to calculate for those reading & interested, degrees C _x9/5=32=degrees F_ 15C is 59F.

About clay I heard that if mixed with rock dusts it can make a fine substrate, I don't recall the soil chemistry about clay but that's something I need to look into for my gardening needs.

#63 JanSteen

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 02:28 PM

The chemistry behind clay is pretty diverse. It's best to keep it simple and say that clay behaves something like a reservoir for ions of all origins. From metals, to nitrogen, to carbon-based molecules. It depends a lot on the stuff you put in your water. For instance, if you wash clay with KCl (potassium chloride) it will release H+ ions. If you wash it with H+ ions, they will substitute the K+ ions. If you use slightly acidic water, 3H+ ions can replace a Fe3+ ion, releasing iron into the soil. And so on.

My chemistry teacher used to say that if we could harness that power and all the secrets of clay, all of our detergents, dish washing soaps, and what not, would all be clay based instead of EDTA (which is a synthetic molecule that acts in the same way). Much like chlorofyl actually, taking up Mg2+ and safeguarding it in a mesh of carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen-atoms. EDTA is less specific though, and takes up nearly all metal ions based on the pH of a solution.
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#64 Heirloom

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 05:59 PM

Soil chemistry is very complicated to me and going into depth would be lost on me. I found lots of valuable information here, thanks.

#65 Heirloom

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 04:25 PM

I just wanted to say that I appreciate the info you provide & now understand why rainwater is better for plants than my tap water. I have done hydro in the past and used RO water for best results though RO is not rain water and Ph & ec readings show a difference and make it easy to understand the harm of high ph chlorinated water on gardens. Here's some clay I am thinking of incorporating into gardening, many types of clay here. I am trying to dry this to be ground up to experiment with on a small scale, to see how it performs.I understand that clay under the topsoil is required for some crops like kwiwi.

Edited by Heirloom , 05 October 2017 - 04:26 PM.


#66 skunk

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 08:45 PM

I've just begun to read over your thread this evening. Frankly I don't know how I missed this thread and how it took me so long to finally make the journey to this thread.

I've only just begun to scratch the surface of thos golden journal. I'm blown away with your knowledge of Coca growing and your Canna post have really got my attention and look forward to finding out how your project with Rhianna is taking shape.


Once I'm through reading your thread I'm sure I'll have lots to ask. Top quality thread so far looking forward to the rest.

Skunk

there is more spirituality in a single psychedelic plant than all the churches of the world

#67 JanSteen

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 01:43 PM

Well, I'm back again. If there's anything you guys need to have cleared up, I'm here on a weekly basis.

#68 JanSteen

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 02:11 PM

So, back to coca in in vitro cultures.. Attempt 400 or so. I've found that after introduction to a medium and in vitro conditions (after cutting and disinfecting and all) it's best to keep cuttings at a low temperature for 2 weeks, and with only ambient lighting (or dark). With low, I mean 10-15 degrees C. This slows down phenolic bleeding and it slows down that finicky wound closing that coca seems to do pretty fast. The wound closing inhibits cells from growing, since the closing part is just dead wood, with no ability to regenerate organs.
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#69 JanSteen

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 02:36 PM

Hypothesis confirmed: cuttings show less abundant growth/transformation when placed in the parents' grow condition right after cutting. A cool and dark period seems to be beneficial. Medium composition was altered for this test. Agar and sucrose were omitted and replaced by a 50/50 perlite/vermiculite mixture, the nutrient solution is still/again MS+vitamins at full strength. It seems to work just as well, with fewer bacterial contamination. Still, a sodium-hypochlorite wash (2% for 5 minutes, wash 3x with sterile tap water) is recommended, as well as a sterile environment. Do not use ethanol at all. It seems to be a think with tropical plants; they just can't handle it. If you really need to, use 3% peroxide solution.
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#70 JanSteen

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 03:24 PM

Tested and found working exceptionally well:
1. Add 1mL of 1mg/mL 6-bap solution to water, water plants.
2. Wait two weeks.
3. Add 1mL of 1mg/mL IBA to the water, water plants (at night).
What happens with the 6-bap? You'll get branching.. So much that the plants will most likely not grow at all, but stall instead.
What happens with the IBA? You'll get a 6-bap inhibitor, and pretty awesome growth. The branches that didn't become shoots, now become shoots.

From a solid yet flimsy stick, to a nice sized bush in 3 weeks. And no, I'm not talking about my dick, this time. This time it's about coca plants, again.

I overcame stalling tropical plants by the way, also by adding IBA to the watering solution. Completely stalled plants revitalized after epibrassinolide (0.1mg/L)+IBA (3mg/L) treatment. Some of my miracle fruit plants were no more than barren sticks, with more dead wood than alive parts due to being burned alive in the sun.. Not anymore! They are alive and kicking again.
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#71 JanSteen

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 11:14 AM

Forementioned hormone treatment yielded results like this:

gallery_149763_2_1719721.jpg

Some meristems divided into as much as 4 unique meristems, meaning there's 3 more points of growth. This causes the plants to become 'bushy' from the first year, instead of after two or three years.

 

gallery_149763_2_905882.jpg

Scary leaf dropping. Then an explosion of flowers, which were left unpollinated to save energy for the revival of the plant, which is happening now. This is a novo, and not a coca (or novo x coca hybrid) like the rest. It responds a lot different to 6-bap, with strongly reduced nodal spaces and very inhibited length growth.

 

gallery_149763_2_693770.jpg

Coca x Novo hybrids all tend to respond in the same manner. Due to some watering and nutrient issues though, some plants have dropped their leafs and need some more time to regenerate.

 

On a small note, just for the people that have been wondering about growth speeds of coca.. These younger plants are close to a year old. That's an estimate at least.. I have posted pics of the berries from which they came, but lazy as I am, I don't feel like going back a few pages to check the dates. Most of these young seedlings have passed the critical stage, in a few months they'll be as indestructible as their parents. Indestructible, yes, but very, very sensitive. Sensitive women can be calmed down with a good backrub, throwing chocolate across the room and keeping some distance.. These coca plants don't care for your care.. They do whatever they want. Little rebels. I like that as much as I dislike that, because it makes diagnosing issues very hard.


Edited by JanSteen, 13 January 2018 - 11:19 AM.

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#72 JanSteen

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 01:24 PM

I took some time to research clay types and what would be suited best for our uses.. It seems that regular river clay should not behave the way my clay does. Regular river clay does in fact wash away, even when collected from greater depths. I gave the wrong information, mea culpa. So what's the perfect alternative? I hate to say it, because I dislike the prices of the stuff, but it's Akadama. Akadama is a unbaked clay type mainly used for bonsais, but since it doesn't wash away easily, it seems to be the best alternative for the clay type I have collected in the wild. If somebody is trying to sell you baked akadama, tell him/her/xe/whatever, to hit the road. Akadama shouldn't be baked, not even once, or else it's just clay pellets with no more special attributes compared to the baked clay pellets you can find in any plant store.

#73 outoforder

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 03:51 PM

I recognized this thread only recently really great stuff! Congratulations!
And mayby I can contribute something to it.

Clays are the finest products of weathering of aluminiumsilicate stones like granite or gneiss.
There are fat clays which consist of smaller particles which are formed let´s say like little plates-
you can think of it like if you are dripping some water on some glass slides and they stick together and are sliding well on each other (under a microscope).
This is plastic clay.
Because clay is a product of erosion and weathering different kind of oxides, minerals and other elements or particles can join the material.
Ironoxide for example causes the red colour, if there is lets say also manganese present the clay gets black (also poisonous if unburnt).
The more metaloxides and for example calciumcarbonate are present the lower the meltingpoint of clay gets.
The more pure the clay the higher the meltingpoint.
If clay is comletely dried and soaked with water again it will fall apart in the different paticles and you end with slip.
You can dehydrate that slip to a certain point and have plastic clay again. Like that its endless reuseable unless burnt.

Loam is geologically spoken a mixture of sand (bigger than 63µm), silt (bigger than 2µm) and clay (smaller than 2µm).
The particles are formed more like grains and because of that not plastic.
You can also burn loam and use like normal ceramics. I mostly use them for creating glazes.

Like what I read about akadama its more like a mixture of loam and clay or some loam with an high amount of clay.
You can make clay and loam stable by burning or high pressure - which both also occure natural.
Japan is an vulcanic island so the loam and clay there is a different than ours, much more metaloxides and minerals are contained
in secondary deposits except calciumcarbonate. This also means that more micronutrients are present which gives this Anagama the special plus of a mineral vertilizer.
What I also read in my short research about Anagama ist that burned anagama is the loam from there but not fired that high that it gets
ceramical characteristics and sinters together.
The material is only baked at a low temperature like 500 degrees.
In my experience clay or loam that low fired tend to fall apart easily if used as a dish for example.
Seramis or other bricklike material is completely different and will only fall apart by erosion, weathering, mycelium and different microorganisms.

Where I am living loam and clay is present nearly everywhere in different qualities.
Despite the loam and clay here most times are high in calciumcarbonate content, I think this could work also out well as an ph-puffer.
For the special mineral and metaloxide content of anagama it would be easy for adding them to the
loam/clay mixture before bakeing to a certain temperature. The lower burnt the material is, the faster it falls apart.

You inspired me to do some test series. It will need some time,when I get results I will post them here.
If anybody get´s an chemical anlysis of anagama that would be great!
I´m quite familiar with silicate chemistry so I could relatively easy alter the material to what we want.

I hope this excursion did not went too far to the depths of silicate techniques.
If I misspelled or used the false term please be forgiving- english is not my first language.

Best greetings!
outoforder

Edited by outoforder, 28 February 2018 - 03:57 PM.

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#74 JanSteen

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 10:21 AM

Thanks for your wonderful addition outoforder! I've learned a few new things here.

#75 JanSteen

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 09:46 AM

Hello, it's me again. Bubble cloning seems to work on coca. Not the sprayer-type of cloning but the float-in-water-with-a-bubbler-underneath type of cloning. Less is more, when it comes to lighting. A single 20W CFL bulb produced bigger leaves than blasting them with neon lights. LED works fine too. Cool white.




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