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The Botanist Files V1.0


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#61 JanSteen

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 02:33 PM

The best time of year to order coca seeds, is whenever the temperature doesn't drop below 15 degrees C. Thats something in farenheit, but I am in no mood for any more conversions today.
You don't need heating mats if you germinate them indoors. Mine do well in any temperature between 15 C and 35 C. So room temperature would be fine.
Just try to make sure you have some live peat moss before you order seeds. You're going to need a patch of it for germination. It's best to have that before the seeds arrive, because time is of great essence. I've had seeds germinate after 60+ days, but the survival rate is absurdly low.

Something I've noticed, that would probably help the survival rate of these youngsters, is that directly after a root starts penetrating the husk, it's best to put the seeds in to the soil. Otherwise the plant will adjust to low-nutrient levels, and it will burn when you put it in a soil medium afterwards. The husk will drop off of the seedling on its own, but if it takes more than 2 weeks, it's best to operate with a fine scalpel and give it a hand. Coca seedlings have a very peculiar transparant-ish layer around the seed edge, which helps you find the area to slice. But lets not get ahead of that, the natural way will work just fine. I think I've described a soil mix, somewhere on these botanist files. The only addition I can make it to use 7% coco peat, and some clay. Other than that: peat, peat moss, and a dash of regular potting soil will do fine. pH should be around 5-6, not much higher. With that, I mean the actual pH of the soil. Watering should be done with the same pH, but if your soil is around 7, your plants will die. That's why the peat is so important. Basically the same principle as with blueberries. They just need acidic soil, otherwise their natural state doesn't allow proper nutrient uptake.

With all these things in mind, you'll be good to go.

@Spooner: that seems like a lot of back breaking work, but clay is good soil none the less. The Netherlands basically thrived on it; we pumped out the sea and marsh water, and when salt washed away, all we had left was clay. I reckon if you dig deeper, you'll find more condensed clay that doesn't fall apart that easily. But as I said; a normal soil transfer would do fine as well. We'll have to make do with whatever we can get! I'm the type that recycles every bucket of potting soil until there's no organic matter left, and then still feed it to the worms before throwing it out in the yard.
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#62 Heirloom

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 04:02 PM

Thank you, this is good info to know. I'll do some more research in this thread and others I recall from the past. I have been meaning to use metric measurements to make it easy for those not familiar with the measuring system I was born into , I like metric. I recall how to calculate for those reading & interested, degrees C _x9/5=32=degrees F_ 15C is 59F.

About clay I heard that if mixed with rock dusts it can make a fine substrate, I don't recall the soil chemistry about clay but that's something I need to look into for my gardening needs.

#63 JanSteen

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 02:28 PM

The chemistry behind clay is pretty diverse. It's best to keep it simple and say that clay behaves something like a reservoir for ions of all origins. From metals, to nitrogen, to carbon-based molecules. It depends a lot on the stuff you put in your water. For instance, if you wash clay with KCl (potassium chloride) it will release H+ ions. If you wash it with H+ ions, they will substitute the K+ ions. If you use slightly acidic water, 3H+ ions can replace a Fe3+ ion, releasing iron into the soil. And so on.

My chemistry teacher used to say that if we could harness that power and all the secrets of clay, all of our detergents, dish washing soaps, and what not, would all be clay based instead of EDTA (which is a synthetic molecule that acts in the same way). Much like chlorofyl actually, taking up Mg2+ and safeguarding it in a mesh of carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen-atoms. EDTA is less specific though, and takes up nearly all metal ions based on the pH of a solution.
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#64 Heirloom

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 05:59 PM

Soil chemistry is very complicated to me and going into depth would be lost on me. I found lots of valuable information here, thanks.

#65 Heirloom

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 04:25 PM

I just wanted to say that I appreciate the info you provide & now understand why rainwater is better for plants than my tap water. I have done hydro in the past and used RO water for best results though RO is not rain water and Ph & ec readings show a difference and make it easy to understand the harm of high ph chlorinated water on gardens. Here's some clay I am thinking of incorporating into gardening, many types of clay here. I am trying to dry this to be ground up to experiment with on a small scale, to see how it performs.I understand that clay under the topsoil is required for some crops like kwiwi.

Edited by Heirloom , 05 October 2017 - 04:26 PM.


#66 skunk

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 08:45 PM

I've just begun to read over your thread this evening. Frankly I don't know how I missed this thread and how it took me so long to finally make the journey to this thread.

I've only just begun to scratch the surface of thos golden journal. I'm blown away with your knowledge of Coca growing and your Canna post have really got my attention and look forward to finding out how your project with Rhianna is taking shape.


Once I'm through reading your thread I'm sure I'll have lots to ask. Top quality thread so far looking forward to the rest.

Skunk

there is more spirituality in a single psychedelic plant than all the churches of the world

#67 JanSteen

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 01:43 PM

Well, I'm back again. If there's anything you guys need to have cleared up, I'm here on a weekly basis.

#68 JanSteen

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 02:11 PM

So, back to coca in in vitro cultures.. Attempt 400 or so. I've found that after introduction to a medium and in vitro conditions (after cutting and disinfecting and all) it's best to keep cuttings at a low temperature for 2 weeks, and with only ambient lighting (or dark). With low, I mean 10-15 degrees C. This slows down phenolic bleeding and it slows down that finicky wound closing that coca seems to do pretty fast. The wound closing inhibits cells from growing, since the closing part is just dead wood, with no ability to regenerate organs.
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