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Coir Only Bulk Invitro Bag


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#41 Heirloom

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 11:41 AM

I did a search on bing about coir and magnesium content and found some info
on Wikipedia. seems many fungi growers use coir, probably on a commercial level.
 coir is rich in  potassium , low in magnesium ( very good for cube production ).

adding some calcium might be helpful, gypsum -calcium sulfate or calcium carbonate
(edit - many have used pickling lime - calcium hydroxide)
probably be best. avoid calcium with 10% or more magnesium.
High mag content  interfers with psilocin production.

young coir is cellulose older coconuts  husks are turned to lignin later.

I wonder if coir can be enhanced by addin an organic like worm castings?
or if the grain based spawn  provides enough nutes to max out each flush?

just some ideas , I am still learning. got a few blocks of coir when my Burma are ready.

very nice thread

 


Edited by Heirloom Spores, 20 September 2015 - 12:42 PM.

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#42 MLBjammer

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 11:53 AM

Well, my point is that coir alone mixed with colonized is enough to produce nice bulk crops.

 

If you mix coir with castings, or any nutritious substance, you will simply achieve bigger and better yields.

 

I never considered adding gypsum or calcium of any sort, but that is interesting.


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#43 happy4nic8r

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 12:27 PM

Did I read this correctly that gypsum is acidic, whereas lime is alkaline?

 

sorry to always go on the pH hunt, but I like to control everything I can. 

 

My original thought was they were both alkaline, but recently I read somewhere that you add gypsum to acidify or lower the pH in alkaline soils.


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#44 morfin-56

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 01:06 PM

Gypsum(calcium sulfate) is neutral, lime(calcium) is alkaline, elemental sulfur is acidic.

Edited by morfin-56, 20 September 2015 - 01:08 PM.

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#45 happy4nic8r

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 01:22 PM

So gypsum would be a calcium source, but when it's taken out, wouldn't the sulfate become acidic?


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#46 Heirloom

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 01:59 PM

happy  you brought up a good thing. you are right about ph .

gypsum  is a calcium sulfer   salt.  calcium is alkaline - sulfure - acidic.
 

gypsum will not alter ph  - but will supply calcium  ans sulpher.

lowering PH is best done with calcium carbonate.

Be nice to know the exact nute requirements of cubes, like they have on corn,  soybeans  , cannabis...ect.

I will start checking my Ph of substrates.  out of curiosity how much does ph affect cube production? should be all adding calcium carbonate? or other additives?

I want to learn


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#47 morfin-56

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 02:03 PM

Yea I would believe so if the mushroom uptakes calcium more then sulfate.
Anyone pH runoff from a substrate after a flush or two using gypsum?
Why not just use calcium so there isn't a build up of acidic sulfur?
Calcium dunk?
Just thinking sort of off topic I guess not really since everyone uses gypsum in there coir for some reason. Me, never but my growing experience is limited.

Calcium carbonate raises pH.

Edited by morfin-56, 20 September 2015 - 02:05 PM.

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#48 Sidestreet

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 02:53 PM

Nice work MLB!  I had pretty much written off coir myself.  Now it looks like it deserves another chance.  :)


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#49 Heirloom

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 03:57 PM

Morfin  nice thoughts about the PH of run off, got to look into that.

I need to check into the nutrient value of my grain .

I might be old but I can still learn.

edit - and pass on the knowledge to local friends/ family.

awesome thread that makes me think.

Attached Thumbnails

  • coir1 002.JPG
  • coir1 001.JPG

Edited by Heirloom Spores, 20 September 2015 - 05:42 PM.

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#50 MLBjammer

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 05:09 PM

Nice work MLB!  I had pretty much written off coir myself.  Now it looks like it deserves another chance.  :)

 

Oh, man, it's essential stuff--cheap and easy to use.  

 

Thanks for the kind words, my friend.


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#51 MLBjammer

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 05:11 PM

I am out of likes for the day, but I dig what everybody is contributing  :victorious:


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#52 MLBjammer

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 04:54 AM

So I dunked the sub for about 12 hours and returned it to fruiting conditions.  The second flush should come along pretty quickly, by the end of the week.  I usually dunk after the second flush, but the bag felt a little light, so I went ahead and submerged it.

 

As far as dunking these, I simply pour water on the sub in the bag until the bottom half or so is submerged, then I sit it on a shelf for 8-12 hours.  Then I cut a small hole in the corner of the bag and drain it that way.  I either tape or clip the bag afterwards.  If I dunk it again, I use the bottoms of some old bags as "diapers" of a sort, lol, to prevent leakage.  It's like Depends for bulk bags!

 

I used to case the bags after the first flush and rehydrate that way, but I figured I could come up with a lazier way to do it and save on the casing material.

 

After doing this many times, it works great and has not resulted in any contams.  But I always clean surfaces and spritz the air with a 10:90 bleach:water solution before exposing my subs to open air.  I also wear gloves, hat and a mask and douse myself heavily in 70% rubbing alcohol.

 

When the next flush pops up, I will show some pics.



#53 MLBjammer

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Posted 25 September 2015 - 04:43 AM

The next flush is coming along, and I should have pics in a few days.  If nothing else, this thread is at least a rundown of how I do bulk, and I will include some prep pics along the way.

 

I am really surprised that more folks aren't using the Sandbag/big bag method, but I am here to spread the word and show the goods.



#54 MLBjammer

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Posted 27 September 2015 - 11:32 AM

So the second flush has arrived.  It worked out to be about an ounce dry (290 grams wet).  I am dunking the sub right now for another flush.  I will keep it going for another few flushes, unless it contaminates (which rarely happens nowadays with these bags).

 

We lost some information in the last few days and several posts to this thread.  If anybody can remember what he/she wrote, please re-post.

 

I will try to post some prep pics in the next few days, which should be helpful to folks just getting into grain jars and bulk growing methods--well, I hope it is helpful anyway.

 

20150927_110340_resized.jpg

 

20150927_110511_resized.jpg


Edited by MLBjammer, 27 September 2015 - 11:34 AM.

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#55 Heirloom

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 10:00 AM

I got some ziplocks ready to try, going to use polyfill.

I tried an oven bag with holes cut before pasteurizing using 2 layers of micropore tape that
did not hold through pasteurizing. I don't suggest you try micropore before pasteurizing , as I did.

I am going to cut holes in 2 zip locks ( pareurized ) and use polyfill . I am doing a 1/2 gallon mason jar, plastic lid with polyfill as well.

doing Burmas  sent from a guy on here. I need to get some clean prints. I milked the grain jars and inoculated several others to keep this going until I get spores.

on another front I added coir to some woodlovers  ps cyans & azures they have grown into the coir. I will take colonized coir add to more coir and see if they grow on it alone. I know they won't fruit on it but might use them to make beds using wood chips.


Edited by Heirloom Spores, 28 September 2015 - 10:04 AM.


#56 MLBjammer

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 12:03 PM

I pasteurize/sterilize in glass quarts, then dump the mix in the bags. I would suggest using either glass or a pillow case if pasteurizing with dung. If you're just using coir, I would sterilize it for 30 minutes at 15 PSI.

For bags, I would recommend the Ziplock Big Bags. A 4-pack should be about $6.
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#57 Heirloom

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 12:40 PM

any reason you don't start with ziplocks ?

When I do well with my 1 gallon bags I am going to use the

2'X1.7' large ziplock.

 



#58 MLBjammer

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 08:24 PM

Ziplocks don't stand up to heat very well, from my experiences, but I am leery of plastic jars and bags in PCs--but they are commonly used, I know.

 

I would say use a thicker plastic, like the unicorn bags, if you want to sterilize everything together.  

 

But for fruiting, yes, the 2'x 1.7' are the ones to get.

 

If you have a Dollar Tree in your area, they sell some comparable bags in the storage section.



#59 Microbe

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Posted 29 September 2015 - 12:26 AM

I did a search on bing about coir and magnesium content and found some info
on Wikipedia. seems many fungi growers use coir, probably on a commercial level.
coir is rich in potassium , low in magnesium ( very good for cube production ).

adding some calcium might be helpful, gypsum -calcium sulfate or calcium carbonate
(edit - many have used pickling lime - calcium hydroxide)
probably be best. avoid calcium with 10% or more magnesium.
High mag content interfers with psilocin production.

young coir is cellulose older coconuts husks are turned to lignin later.

I wonder if coir can be enhanced by addin an organic like worm castings?
or if the grain based spawn provides enough nutes to max out each flush?

just some ideas , I am still learning. got a few blocks of coir when my Burma are ready.

very nice thread

Or by adding straw..... ;)
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#60 Microbe

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Posted 29 September 2015 - 12:30 AM

Nice work MLB! I had pretty much written off coir myself. Now it looks like it deserves another chance. :)

Why did you write off coir? Im passing my newb stage( i think) but coir has always been part of all my bulk projects. Im curious to what happened or didnt happen.
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