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Home Mycology Hacks and Tips, let's share!


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#41 catattack

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 12:24 PM

listen kids, I've learned volumes from @seeker2be, so pay attention!

 

@seeker, no thoughts are too elementary on one of 'my' threads, seriously thanks for adding!

;)


Edited by catattack, 31 December 2015 - 12:24 PM.

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#42 Seeker2be

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 01:08 PM

Its the little things that matter.  I still have a lot to learn.


Edited by Seeker2be, 31 December 2015 - 01:10 PM.

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#43 TVCasualty

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 03:44 PM

Fully colonized cake:
attachicon.gifCake.jpg

 
 
Now take that cake and stretch it out into 20 quarts of grain spawn (it'd only take 3 or 4 extra days)!

 
Or inoculate each quart with more slurry and get 10 colonized in three. My all-time fastest speed record from inoculation to full-colonization of a quart jar (using cracked corn as the grain) is 56 hours.
 
Here's the details: https://mycotopia.ne...-in-three-days/
 
I really haven't changed much of anything since I started using that method. Heck, I'm still using the exact same blades and dispenser nozzles!
 
A few excerpts:
 

the dispenser nozzle allowed the liquid to be precisely metered so I never ran out too early or under-spawned any jars, and I used a separate blender/nozzle assembly for each of the 6 half-pints for cleanliness.

It took me slightly less than two hours to dump the half-pints into the blenders, blend, and inoculate all 120 quarts (and that includes the time to shake the hell out of them).

 
And all 120 finish within hours of each other by the end of the the third (or usually the fourth) day. I've lowered my preferred incubation temp. since writing up that Tek so it usually takes 'em a little longer than 3 days, but no more than 5.
 
And yes, that's a lot of quarts. As such...
 

As far as I know, mine is the fastest way to get ratios like 240 quarts of grain from 24 cc's of spores in under three weeks. This tek helps achieve an economy of scale, and is really too fast for home cultivators to use to it's full potential. I'd actually been working on it so I could get into growing a (small) commercial volume of edibles without the significant investment it normally requires (your backyard sheds/grow-rooms will be maxed out with mushrooms long before you reach the output limits of this procedure, in other words).


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#44 Needles

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 05:27 PM

So now that you have that perfect strain isolated or maybe made a clone how do you store that culture for further use?

I have tried petri plates, test tube slants and what I found to work best for me is liquid storage. peacefrog's blender tek is a great way to prepare a culture for storage. Using the least amount of nutrients in the slurry is best for long term storage. Liquid culture taken from broth made of sugars, malts and the sort tend to become overgrown with myc on the surface very quickly over time. Plain water seems to work the best to keep your specimen living in a suspended state. My hack on this is with a vegetable peeler that has one side cut, shaped and inserted into a piece of 1/4" stainless steel tubing. That alowes for the petri dish culture to be "scalped" right under the mycelial mat taking the minimum amount of agar as posable. Once blended, the slurry is sucked up into a sterialized syringe then into a 20ml storage bottle.
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#45 catattack

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 05:32 PM

So now that you have that perfect strain isolated or maybe made a clone how do you store that culture for further use?

I have tried petri plates, test tube slants and what I found to work best for me is liquid storage. peacefrog's blender tek is a great way to prepare a culture for storage. Using the least amount of nutrients in the slurry is best for long term storage. Liquid culture taken from broth made of sugars, malts and the sort tend to become overgrown with myc on the surface very quickly over time. Plain water seems to work the best to keep your specimen living in a suspended state. My hack on this is with a vegetable peeler that has one side cut, shaped and inserted into a piece of 1/4" stainless steel tubing. That alowes for the petri dish culture to be "scalped" right under the mycelial mat taking the minimum amount of agar as posable. Once blended, the slurry is sucked up into a sterialized syringe then into a 20ml storage bottle.
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That is so great! I have a vegetable peeler in my mycology kit that I put in instinctively, not knowing what I was going to do with it, now you've given me the hack! Love it!


Edited by catattack, 31 December 2015 - 05:32 PM.

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#46 pastyoureyes

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 08:56 PM

Needles, how are you making those bottles? Looks like an injection port for the cap and is it taped or do you have some kind of special sealer? Also what size bottle/injection port?



#47 Juthro

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 09:50 PM

Are those insulin bottles?

#48 Needles

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Posted 01 January 2016 - 12:36 AM

In my post with the photos I said the bottles were 20ml I was wrong they are 25ml and would not want to get any smaller. I got them from American science and surplus. The blue self healing injection port is 10mm and is just taped on with lab film. Sterilizing the bottles can be a pain, the caps need to be barely on or they will pop off or create a vacuum if inserted fully. I found a stainless steel canister from vollrath medical that works perfect for three bottles. I contacted vollrath to try to order more but it was out of production. Wrapping totally with foil works fine. A 50ml syringe will be enough to fill three bottles @15ml without drawing more slurry.
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#49 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 11:35 AM

I don't know if this belongs here , a hepa /flow wall built for $20 = the cost of the true heap filter and a tube of caulking.

All other materials I already had, the 4" hole saw. the box free , a 120cfm fan. I imagine a plastic tub could be used for a box with the lid sealed using caulking.

not perfect but works needs painted, the filter is a little crooked due to using a pocket knife to cut my filter hole, I leave tools around and my mate she puts away and that makes them hard to find.

Not pretty but it works. the true hepa filter is 11" long 7 " high and I think 6"deep.
It may not last as long as a more expensive unit , I think it will last long enough.

I could improve this by adding a uvc light inside to kill germs ( caution uvc will blind a person) , painting it , making it more pleasing to the eye.

It has helped me another thing I did was get a MERV 11 air filter for my furnace , it catches spores bacteria and virus. They use MERV 13 -16 for operating rooms  for general surgery. I can run my furnace blower for an hour or 2 with outh out turning on the heat or air con to aid in air filtration.




 

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#50 catattack

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 11:41 AM

In my post with the photos I said the bottles were 20ml I was wrong they are 25ml and would not want to get any smaller. I got them from American science and surplus. The blue self healing injection port is 10mm and is just taped on with lab film. Sterilizing the bottles can be a pain, the caps need to be barely on or they will pop off or create a vacuum if inserted fully. I found a stainless steel canister from vollrath medical that works perfect for three bottles. I contacted vollrath to try to order more but it was out of production. Wrapping totally with foil works fine. A 50ml syringe will be enough to fill three bottles @15ml without drawing more slurry.

 

why not seal them and then stick needles in them so that no vacuum is created? 


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#51 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 02:50 PM

Needles a very useful tip to me and your scraper should be pro Lab equipment , I will make one.

I got to agree with your water tek  for storage of  Myc, from experience and accident.


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#52 TVCasualty

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 05:11 PM

It has helped me another thing I did was get a MERV 11 air filter for my furnace , it catches spores bacteria and virus. They use MERV 13 -16 for operating rooms  for general surgery. I can run my furnace blower for an hour or 2 with outh out turning on the heat or air con to aid in air filtration.

 

Take care that the filter isn't adding too much static pressure to your HVAC system, which could wear out the blower faster and in the meantime make the system significantly less efficient, or make your indoor air quality exponentially worse.

 

Blowers are spec'd for the static pressure of the duct work with the assumption that the filters used with it will be the cheap, almost-useless fiberglass filters that only filter out the big stuff.
 
The filters on ducted systems are only intended to keep crap from building up on the blower, not to improve indoor air quality for the occupants.
 
For a whole-house air filtration system that uses your existing ducts, the recommended approach is a bypass system with it's own fan/blower so it won't mess up the balancing (assuming such was done when the system was installed, which is often a bad assumption in the context of residential systems).

 
Example of bypass-system:
 
hvac_system_bypass_filtration.jpg
 
 
Where using "high efficiency" filters on your ducts can bite you in the ass (as it has bitten me) is if you end up drawing dirty air into your system downstream from the filter and spreading it around your house (the exact opposite of what you were intending!).
 
In my case, the system installed in my house was put together 15 years ago by idiots (I always use stand-alone HEPA room-air filters so my problems weren't due to excessive back-pressure caused by a filter, but my poorly-designed system led to the same net result).

 
The result of the lack of balancing was that the suction on the return side was significantly higher than the pressure on the supply side, and when combined with old ducts that had loose/missing tape and no sealant to speak of at the seams it meant I was drawing air from my dank, nasty crawlspace and blowing it right into my house. That in turn led to the lab "crash" that I'm still rebuilding from (my contam rates had been steadily climbing for about a year, then suddenly skyrocketed to where I was forced to shut down until I do a major overhaul, though I don't intend to use the ducts anymore at all).
 

Is it really possible for a high efficiency filter to degrade the performance of an HVAC system that badly? Many times a restrictive filter has the potential to turn a 14 SEER system into an 8 SEER system. Sadly poor system performance resulting from restrictive filters is being verified across the country every day. This has to make you question how many HVAC systems have had their lives significantly shortened by upgrading the air filter in the name of indoor air quality improvement. The first two principles of indoor air quality are controlling both temperature and humidity. Installing a restrictive filter can have an immediate negative impact on both of these indoor air quality principles.

 

...

 

Then there is the safety aspect of a restrictive filter. In many installations there can be natural draft equipment installed near the HVAC equipment. As a restrictive filter begins to cause an increase in return side static pressure the competition for airflow begins in the mechanical area. Many times this battle is lost by the water heater and the larger stronger fan in the HVAC equipment will win. When this occurs the water heater losing the airflow battle will now begin to spill its flue gases and/or experience deteriorating combustion.

Source (with more info): http://ncidavid.blog...-filter-be.html


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#53 Needles

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 07:18 PM


[/quote]
 
why not seal them and then stick needles in them so that no vacuum is created?
[/quote]
Not a bad idea Cat, you would need one for filling and one for a airport. Filling these little bottles is a pain especially with a 50cc syringe full of liquid slurry. One could just attach the syringe to the needle and fill. BTW, I went to place a order with American Science Surplus, they were no longer available. Once I find anouther sorce I'll let you know. One good thing, the self healing ports are inexpensive and the bottles can be washed and reused.

#54 catattack

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 07:48 PM

Yeah, I play with lid design a lot, still tryna get it purrfect. I got the gas exchange SHIP chumpies in the mail the other day, I'll report back or drop some finalized lid designs here! 



#55 Needles

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:31 PM

Very interested in your lids Cat, I have been using plastic lids with a piece of filter disk glued over a quarter inch hole for gas exchange.
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#56 catattack

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:49 PM

I've been using those lil circle band aids siliconed on for GE, and am using the red heavy duty SHIPs.

 

Going to try the syringe ports with the GE built in. I got both sizes..

 

I saw @pastafarian 's sweet glass lids for widemouth agar work on another site. He's probably on this thread or I'll message him about them.


Edited by catattack, 04 January 2016 - 10:51 PM.


#57 catattack

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 08:12 PM

Oven Pasteurization moisture hack:

 

So this one came from the top of my dome as I slipped in and out of the ether.. (sleeping):

 

For those of you who are doing oven pasteurization, after you get your vessels in the oven at field capacity and evenly distributed, pour boiling water into a shallow pan and place near the heat source. The idea being that if the air immediately surrounding the substrate is at a high RH, the sub will lose less moisture in the process. I've been doing it for 15+ yrs when I cook pork roast or whatever, why not subs?

 

1950s-kitchen.jpg


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#58 Cue

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:29 AM

Oven Pasteurization moisture hack:

 

So this one came from the top of my dome as I slipped in and out of the ether.. (sleeping):

 

For those of you who are doing oven pasteurization, after you get your vessels in the oven at field capacity and evenly distributed, pour boiling water into a shallow pan and place near the heat source. The idea being that if the air immediately surrounding the substrate is at a high RH, the sub will lose less moisture in the process. I've been doing it for 15+ yrs when I cook pork roast or whatever, why not subs?

 

 

 

why not subs?

Because I don't have room for both in my Easy Bake Oven.

images.jpeg

 

Seriously though, I use stock pots with tight fitting lids and I don't have an issues with losing much moisture.


Edited by Pastafarian, 08 January 2016 - 04:33 AM.


#59 catattack

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 09:48 AM

Here's anther one I just dreamed up:

 

I think it was @peacefrog that uses a bleach soaked towel as an entire side of his SAB, so I was thinking (watch out!), if one were in a hurry to re-load the PC, one could cover said cooling PC off with a similarly soaked towel and depressurize, the towel acting as a sanitizing filter for the gas/air being drawn into the PC.

 

Thoughts?


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#60 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 11:55 AM

I like the idea of a disinfectant towel or even a wash cloth to filter air coming in during cooling.

How does bleach react to aluminum ? a lot of PC's are aluminum.


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