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Simple bulk recipe for Pans


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#1 peacefrog

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 12:41 PM

I have read a few posts where the question has been asked about a good recipe for Pan species. I was preparing a sub for a small invitro cake grow, so I thought I would share the recipe that works very well for me.

The only addition to my recipe is coir. It seems, I underestimated it for many years and now see the great properties it can bring to dung lovers. Since I never really had measurements before, I decided to do one for for this post:
1 part manue
1/2 part verm
1/2 part coir
1/16 part gypsum(just a bit)
For a cake formula I throw in 1/2 part BRF or any other grain flower

First I pour some of my field composted horse manure in a bowl:
image.jpeg

Then I break up all clumps and remove any wood, rocks etc, to make it very fluffy. If using aged manure patties, do the same thing:
image.jpeg

I then add the coir and break up as much as possible:
image.jpeg

Then add the verm and gypsum:
image.jpeg

If making cakes, or planning on sterilizing you can add BRF:
image.jpeg

I then mix all very well in dry form before adding water, breaking up any more clumps I may have missed:
image.jpeg

Lastly add water slowly and feel with your hands until you have attained field capacity:
image.jpeg

Now all you need to do is sterilize or pasteurize, using any method that you feel comfortable with. Just remember if you sterilize your sub, you must adhere to sterile tek. during spawning or inoculation. If pasteurizing, you can spawn in open air. I have done it both ways with equal success.

And of course this recipe will work with cubes or any other dung lover.
Peace and happy growing to all!
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#2 meyer

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 05:03 PM

That was an awesome description peace, we all thank you for that info. So when growing pans in tubs or bags the depth should only be 2-3 inches vs. Cubes where it's closer to 3-4, is that correct? I just started my first bags and tubs and all of mine are 3-4 inches in depth right now, I do not think i will case them due to all of the negative comments about it, unless one of are experts comes along and comments differently.

Do you or should you, case pans in bulk grows?

As always, thank you for the info! Happy shrooming to all a good night.
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#3 peacefrog

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 05:39 PM

Meyer,

Thank you for the kind comments. To case or not to case with cubes is very debatable. They do not require a casing, but some cultivators, myself being one, always case my cube sub. I started with grain, moved to cakes, and eventually to bulk subs. So I just always liked it and got better results from casing, as I could slowly bring up my moisture content with misting in between flushes. But like said, above, it is just a preference and what ever you prefer. I would recommend doing both and see what works best for you.

Pans do require a very thin casing for optimal fruiting and you will get the best results from no more than a 2 inch layer of bulk and no more then a 1/4 inch or so of casing. However, I have seen some bag grows that are more than 2 inches in depth produce. So there seems to be some wiggle room there. Personally, I never had much luck at all with depths more than 2 inches. And I have seen pans first hand grow without a casing in my invitro trials. But it was very minimal and only 2 small true invitro fruits grew:
image.jpeg

So there is some room to experiment with pans it seems. But I would definitely stick to known tek for my first time. And only deviate and experiment once you the hang of how they grow and what makes them tick so to speak.
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#4 wharfrat

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 05:49 PM

nice write up froggy, good info :thumbs_up:


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#5 GlitchInSpace

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 06:50 PM

can't wait to see which pans you're going to use :)

Edited by whitethumb, 17 December 2015 - 06:51 PM.

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#6 peacefrog

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 07:01 PM

Me too, whitethumb!  


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#7 Cigarsam

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 07:35 PM

Nice information.
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#8 CatsAndBats

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 05:47 PM

With the panCAKE version, could one inoculate with spores? How important is GE in jars for pans? Meaning, I have made 1/2in holes covered with band-aids as GE and heavy duty SHIPs my standard all purpose lid:

 

 

IMG_2086.JPG


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#9 peacefrog

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 06:43 PM

Absolutely yes, you can noc up with spores. You can run the cakes exactly how you would with cubes. I don't use holes in my lids for cakes and just leave them loose like I would do with any mushroom species I have grown.

A cake from my invitro trials showing the lid:
image.jpeg

Those are cool lids there, cat. They sure wouldn't hurt anything, but just not a necessity.
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#10 CatsAndBats

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 07:10 PM

Dry verm layer then? I know that you do your inocs just under the lid, correct? I think @meyer is going to do it with me, watch him smoke me ;)


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#11 peacefrog

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 07:14 PM

Yep dry verm on top like normal. And yes I open my lid just enough to get the syringe in, in a SAB.
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#12 meyer

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 07:17 PM

I used the same type of jars for the cakes I nocced up with Pans Jamaican. My cakes I originally made for these were about 25 to 30% manure.

 

I also just nocced up 2 bags of 2 lbs. of Rye bags with Pans Cambodgenis. Lakegirl look like she had success with that. There is no manure in these bags, should I wait and see how it plays out? Or open them up and risk contams and add manure & my BRF mix I have been using?



#13 meyer

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 07:19 PM

The only thing I will be smoking is nice sweet sativa... I am still learning everything and I know its all easy, but ONE lil fuck up and your done.



#14 peacefrog

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 07:25 PM

I used the same type of jars for the cakes I nocced up with Pans Jamaican. My cakes I originally made for these were about 25 to 30% manure.
 
I also just nocced up 2 bags of 2 lbs. of Rye bags with Pans Cambodgenis. Lakegirl look like she had success with that. There is no manure in these bags, should I wait and see how it plays out? Or open them up and risk contams and add manure & my BRF mix I have been using?


Let it ride no reason to risk contaminating your bag. If you change your mind and decide to use manure based bulk, you will have plenty of colonized grain to do so. I personally have not had great results from grain only with pans. Although it will produce, my experience has shown that manure will produce much better than grain alone for um.
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#15 meyer

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 07:29 PM

Thanks peace! I plan to bulkout to manure and/or 50/50 and then do a light case as everyone has described. I am just using the Rye to colonize the myc.

 

Does that sound good? I was thinking a 1:1 ratio to keep my odds for success high.


Edited by meyer, 01 February 2016 - 07:29 PM.

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#16 Lazerus00

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 01:45 PM

Hey PeaceFrog, awesome write up and appreciate all the priceless info!! I use a pan recipe very similar but the ratios are a bit different. I'm deff going to try this way but i was curious about something. I get my coir in bricks so when i break it up to make sub it has always involved using water, usually hot, and mixing everything wet. Since i want to try and mix dry like you suggest do you have any ideas on how i should break up the coir to get it broken up fluffy and dry?? I know i could prolly buy loose coir but I'm getting great prices on these bricks. I don't have a mulcher or leaf shredder so I'm kinda at a loss of how i would do it... If you have any suggestions it would be great and if not, no worries, I'll figure something out.... Thanks again!
Positive Vibes!

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#17 MLBjammer

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 08:25 PM

If you bust a block of coir into smaller chunks (I use the claw part of a small hammer), you can more easily crumble it up.  You can hydrate it before adding it to your bulk mix, though, and it's a helluva lot less labor-intensive.

 

You would want to test your overall mix for field capacity moisture before pasteurizing it anyway, so adding wet coir will simply reduce the amount of water you would be using.


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#18 Lazerus00

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 08:29 PM

If you bust a block of coir into smaller chunks (I use the claw part of a small hammer), you can more easily crumble it up. You can hydrate it before adding it to your bulk mix, though, and it's a helluva lot less labor-intensive.

You would want to test your overall mix for field capacity moisture before pasteurizing it anyway, so adding wet coir will simply reduce the amount of water you would be using.

Good call... Thanks man!

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#19 CatsAndBats

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 09:27 PM

If you bust a block of coir into smaller chunks (I use the claw part of a small hammer), you can more easily crumble it up.  You can hydrate it before adding it to your bulk mix, though, and it's a helluva lot less labor-intensive.

 

You would want to test your overall mix for field capacity moisture before pasteurizing it anyway, so adding wet coir will simply reduce the amount of water you would be using.

 

 

 

If you bust a block of coir into smaller chunks (I use the claw part of a small hammer), you can more easily crumble it up. You can hydrate it before adding it to your bulk mix, though, and it's a helluva lot less labor-intensive.

You would want to test your overall mix for field capacity moisture before pasteurizing it anyway, so adding wet coir will simply reduce the amount of water you would be using.

Good call... Thanks man!

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FYI It's about 3qts of h2o per brick of eco-earth coir sold at pet stores as reptile/arachnid bedding in 3 brick packs.


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#20 Lazerus00

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 10:21 PM

If you bust a block of coir into smaller chunks (I use the claw part of a small hammer), you can more easily crumble it up. You can hydrate it before adding it to your bulk mix, though, and it's a helluva lot less labor-intensive.

You would want to test your overall mix for field capacity moisture before pasteurizing it anyway, so adding wet coir will simply reduce the amount of water you would be using.


If you bust a block of coir into smaller chunks (I use the claw part of a small hammer), you can more easily crumble it up. You can hydrate it before adding it to your bulk mix, though, and it's a helluva lot less labor-intensive.

You would want to test your overall mix for field capacity moisture before pasteurizing it anyway, so adding wet coir will simply reduce the amount of water you would be using.

Good call... Thanks man!

Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk

FYI It's about 3qts of h2o per brick of eco-earth coir sold at pet stores as reptile/arachnid bedding in 3 brick packs.
Yup that's the one i use.... Thank you!

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