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Monsanto has a new plan..............again


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#1 Skywatcher

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 09:34 PM

I have copied this short article to repaste here. If we cannot trust this monster now, how is it that anyone continues to buy into this insanity?

 

A Probable Carcinogen Is Now the Most Heavily Used Weed Killer in History
But don't expect a new analysis of glyphosate use to derail Monsanto's plans for its next-generation herbicides.
glyphosate-Roundup-MAIN.jpg?itok=DiWytCf

(Photo: Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images)

 
FEB 2, 2016
Jason_BestBP100.jpg?itok=0zvIcPqn
Jason Best is a regular contributor to TakePart who has worked for Gourmet and the Natural Resources Defense Council.
 

One of the promises made at the beginning of Monsanto’s biotech revolution some 20 years ago was that planting crops genetically engineered to withstand weed killer applications would dramatically reduce the amount of chemicals farmers used. So why are we virtually drowning in herbicide today?

An analysis published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Sciences Europe finds that, rather than herald a bright future where farmers had to rely less on chemical herbicides, broad adoption of Monsanto GMO crops designed to withstand the herbicide glyphosate appears to have instead led to a chemical deluge. Today, glyphosate, which Monsanto markets under the brand name Roundup, stands as “the most widely and heavily applied weed-killer in the history of chemical agriculture in both the U.S. and globally,” according to a statement released by the Environmental Working Group in response to the findings.

 

 

Indeed, the analysis finds that use of glyphosate has skyrocketed 15-fold since Monsanto introduced its line of Roundup Ready crops in 1996. Although the chemical herbicide has been around since the mid-1970s, some 75 percent of all glyphosate applied to crops during the history of its use has been sprayed in the last 10 years. That equates to 2.4 billion pounds sprayed in just the U.S. from 2004 to 2014, the equivalent of 436 million gallons of Monsanto’s Roundup PowerMax formula.

Put in another, more Web-savvy way, the Environmental Working Group translates that mind-boggling amount as enough to fill some 3 million kiddie pools a foot deep—which, put end to end, would span the country.   

It wasn’t supposed to turn out this way—at least not according to the vision Monsanto sold farmers a generation ago. The problem with glyphosate was that it had a nasty tendency to kill crops along with weeds, but Monsanto said it had neatly solved that problem with its line of patented GMO crops. Because those Roundup Ready crops were engineered to thrive even when doused with glyphosate, farmers could use the potent herbicide to kill pesky weeds, in less amounts than they might with other types of herbicides.

glyphosate-Roundup-INLINE.jpg?itok=uFo6H

A bag of Monsanto seed corn with Roundup Ready herbicide on
a farm in Princeton, Illinois. (Photo: Getty Images)

 

That's what happened—at first. But within a decade, something “unexpected” occurred—or rather, it was unexpected only if you believe it never dawned on the experts in life sciences at Monsanto that it might happen. Farmers began reporting that certain weeds appeared to have developed a resistance to glyphosate. Instead of using less herbicide, now some farmers were being forced to use much more to combat a growing epidemic of “monster weeds.”

Why does all this matter today, even beyond the staggering amount of glyphosate that’s being applied to American cropland and the broken promises of the agrochemical industry that the deluge represents?

For starters, last year the International Agency for Research on Cancer, an arm of the World Health Organization, made big news when it classified glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen, raising significant concerns about the safety for the farmworkers around the world who are charged with applying massive amounts of the herbicide to fields, as well as the health of agricultural communities where use is heaviest.

Second, rather than take a long, hard look at what’s happened in the 20 years since Monsanto sold farmers on the company’s trademarked crop “system,” the big agrochemical giants are instead rolling out a new generation of GMO crops coupled with newly formulated chemical combos.

Despite the withdrawal of the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency late last year, Dow remains committed to getting its Enlist Duo system to market, while Monsanto is developing Xtend, or what might be dubbed “Roundup Ready 2.0.” In an effort to combat the scourge of super weeds, both companies have developed powerful herbicides that pair more chemicals with—you guessed it—more glyphosate.      


Edited by Skywatcher, 02 February 2016 - 09:37 PM.

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#2 roc

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 09:57 PM

FUCK Monsanto!


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#3 wharfrat

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 12:19 AM

i second that "FUCK Monsanto!" fortunately the people have woken up, monsanto is crashing hard but it might be too late to save us.


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#4 PsyBearknot

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 02:22 AM

start growing shit in your own back yard and front yard and basement.  Start to rebuild your own soil and fight it all naturally, build composts, friend the worms ...we cant take down the giant, but the giant will fall.  however if we start now and save what we have....Improve what we have...at least we will still have....


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#5 Myc

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 08:04 AM

I'm with ya PsyBearknot

 

Start cropping every available surface - patios, backyards, flower beds, sunrooms, etc........

I'm thinking about creating another thread to compare with Urban Composting 101.

 

Urban Gardening 101. It's a work in progress with which I've been experimenting since I arrived here at this site. I've learned a few dos and don'ts along the way and have accumulated a number of tricks. I don't use fertilizer or pesticides - ever. It seems as though this type of change is crying out for attention. Perhaps it may lead to survival of the fittest - in the truest sense.


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#6 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 12:42 PM

Of those that know me here..

 

you all know how deep I get into the soil and microbes and all the growing of food stuffs...

 

 

There is nothing you can do that will change what big corps are doing.

 

 

The only thing YOU CAN DO is grow your own shit... simple as that.

 

 

 

Do some research and look up some youtube videos..

 

 

this shit isnt rocket science... farmers and scientists have both made growing food

way more complex then it really is. 

 

 

Its very simple stuff, really....

 

 

[Direct Link]

 

 

 

^^^^^   GL everyone.

 

 

 

Its beneficial to be aware of whats going on for only one reason.

 

The ability for one to be able to descriptively and factually explain what it is that

companies like Nestle and Monsanto(Nestle is way worse then monsanto btw, look it up)

are doing and what those actions are doing to US and the ENVIRONMENT. 

You'll never STOP them from doing wat they are doing, but what you can do

is educate people in why its better to eat food that "YOU GROW" rather then

food grown by big corporations.

 

(now, I dont know of any, but for the sake of exceptions, id only assume that there

might be a few big corps that are doing it RIGHT.. and PROPER... but you dont

hear about them and its probably nearly impossible to look them up and find them lol) 

 

 

 

 

Why people insist on making a simple task complicated is beyond me.

 

 

 

 

we will NEVER get away from having to use cover crops, cut backs weeds, or crop rotations...

There just isnt any other way to do it that is sustainable, simple as that.

Now until we get more sophisticated robots that are able to do the tasks for us, we gotta

put up with doing what little work is required in the mean time lol. 

 

 

Rather then working against nature, working with her is just so much easier, she

employs MILLIONS AND MILLIONS AND MILLIONS of tiny stewards for your portions of healthy soil :P


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#7 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 12:45 PM

I'm with ya PsyBearknot

 

Start cropping every available surface - patios, backyards, flower beds, sunrooms, etc........

I'm thinking about creating another thread to compare with Urban Composting 101.

 

Urban Gardening 101. It's a work in progress with which I've been experimenting since I arrived here at this site. I've learned a few dos and don'ts along the way and have accumulated a number of tricks. I don't use fertilizer or pesticides - ever. It seems as though this type of change is crying out for attention. Perhaps it may lead to survival of the fittest - in the truest sense.

 

 

Urban Gardening has been around for some time now, "urban composting" just the same... they go hand in hand.

 

Keep at it :)   Best thing you can do is START AND DO IT, because noone else is going to lol.  

 

 

 

 

I like to say, "i guess it just depends on how much you wanna be healthy when regarding doing healthy gardening" 

 

 

 

 

 

BTW-

If you wanna jump on anything, start Aquaponics, trust me, its going to take over and

before you know it, there will be an aquaponic setup in every urban garden settings and

large farms will be stupid not to incorporate aquaponics to the whole story.   

 

 

Aquaponics is the way to go.   Just dont forget to add those Black Soldier Flys to the story

board too, they are REQUIRED imo ;)

 

 

Some people are doing this stuff already lol.  Myself included. 

Current tilapia count - 2000 :P(started with 67 fingerlings Oct 2014)

 

personal 2-3yr goal - 120k fish, harvest 5-8k fish a month. 

 

 

1 momma tilapia can produce 500 babies per spawn. 


Edited by Il19z8rn4li1, 03 February 2016 - 12:49 PM.

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#8 PsyBearknot

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 03:08 PM

I'm with ya PsyBearknot
 
Start cropping every available surface - patios, backyards, flower beds, sunrooms, etc........
I'm thinking about creating another thread to compare with Urban Composting 101.
 
Urban Gardening 101. It's a work in progress with which I've been experimenting since I arrived here at this site. I've learned a few dos and don'ts along the way and have accumulated a number of tricks. I don't use fertilizer or pesticides - ever. It seems as though this type of change is crying out for attention. Perhaps it may lead to survival of the fittest - in the truest sense.


I look forward to the posts. Urban farming / gardening is close at heart for me as far as making a complete career change In 5-7 years
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#9 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 03:41 PM

 

I'm with ya PsyBearknot
 
Start cropping every available surface - patios, backyards, flower beds, sunrooms, etc........
I'm thinking about creating another thread to compare with Urban Composting 101.
 
Urban Gardening 101. It's a work in progress with which I've been experimenting since I arrived here at this site. I've learned a few dos and don'ts along the way and have accumulated a number of tricks. I don't use fertilizer or pesticides - ever. It seems as though this type of change is crying out for attention. Perhaps it may lead to survival of the fittest - in the truest sense.


I look forward to the posts. Urban farming / gardening is close at heart for me as far as making a complete career change In 5-7 years

 

 

 

 

Myc is an amazing composter :) 

 

He's the one that turned me onto hydrating all my mushroom subs with compost juices, and adding some

to the mix while steeping grains.

 

:)  Compost Ninja he is lol


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#10 PsyBearknot

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 03:54 PM

Anyone working with BioChar?

#11 CatsAndBats

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 04:24 PM

Anyone working with BioChar?

no, but I want to, it's on my long list of 'to do' projects.

 

http://www.biochar-international.org/

 

http://www.backyardbiochar.net/



#12 Myc

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 05:14 PM

Thanks for the mention Il19 - it warms the heart. Especially if you knew just how many tips and tricks I've adopted from your methods over the years.

Glad to know it has been an equitable exchange.

 

I've blown people away (way out of the park) with that 12:1 lighting cycle for indoor gardening. Folks just don't believe it works - at first. 

Then, they put me on a pedestal - for doing just what you've pointed out above - I try to keep it as simple as possible. Gardening is basically stupid simple once you get the hang of it.

 

I did a bunch of straw-bale gardening last year (complete with edible mushroom culture included). Again, folks were f-ing blown away at my being able to raise food in a straw-bale.


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#13 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 07:33 PM

Anyone working with BioChar?

 

of course ;) 

 

its good stuff, you gotta "charge" it first though before adding to any soil mix or substrate.

 

 

BioChar is good for both mushrooms and plants.

 

 

 

charging means, just brew up a compost tea and soak the char in that. 

 

 

you can have up to 10% of your soil mixture consist of biochar, but I wouldnt recommend

starting out with that right off the bat, add it a little at a time over your amending practices. 

 

I think my container soil is like 2-3% char and i think it helps a lot with retention.  

 

 

 

just remember that charging though, thats the most important, otherwise its going to lock up your nutes in order

to satisfy its CEC. 


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#14 rainbowsmurf

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 03:44 AM

Monsanto doesn't just deal with toxins for the soil and spraying food with chemicals, it goes far deeper than that...  it is a major player in genetically modified foods too. 

 

A simple list of all food companies owned and that have modified products in them can be found on this link. 

 

http://www.trueactiv...food-producers/

 

Worth a read folks if you care about what you and your family eat. 

 

Best advice.... Grow your own where you can. Make your own meals from scratch, much better than processed - cheaper too.  Teach your sprogletts to cook from an early age. It is messy, but great fun and is a valuable skill being lost in today's society. 


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#15 CatsAndBats

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 09:35 AM

and cultivate remediation mush in your locality, king stroph, oyster, etc.. Plus ingest chaga, Turkey Tail, and so on..






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