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Starting right with bees


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#1 wharfrat

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 09:37 PM

just a PDF that i found interesting on beekeeping. it's a bit old but bees are still bees :biggrin:

http://dctb00kz.com/...ghtwithbees.pdf


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#2 truMushrooms

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 11:33 PM

cool, I'll be giving it a read soon

I saw this article on the web http://firstwefeast....eat/weed-honey/

really interesting if you ask me  :biggrin:


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#3 rainbowsmurf

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 01:09 PM

Interested in beekeeping?

 

Join your local beekeeping association.

 

Not only will you pick up loads of useful tips and have someone to call on in moments of confusion (I have a lot of those) It is a great way to meet like minded souls and learn from experienced local beekeepers.

 

Members come from all walks of life and have a keeness to pass on their experience and knowledge. They can't help themselves...  Many are amateurs (like me) with one or two hives but others will have many more colonies in their aparies.

 

Some associations run courses during winter or get guest speakers in so you can learn more over a pint and honey cake.. Home brewed Honey beer is amazing btw.

 

Anyway... back to the post before my mind wanders again....By Spring, the meetings are held at local apparies where newly aquired knowledge is put into practice. Often newbies can don their bee suit for the first time and looked into an open hive. Usually it is at this point that enthusiasm takes over and you become hooked!!!

 

Local associations are a great way to get to know about bees and bee keeping before you decide you want to go ahead with it. Members can often help you out with equipment, where to buy, best sources and of course can often help start you off with your own colonies of bees. Lucky association members also get called in to help control swarms and hey presto... a new colony for someone.

 

The way to go if serious about beekeeping. I recommend it :biggrin:


Edited by rainbowsmurf, 23 April 2016 - 01:11 PM.

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#4 Myc

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 08:58 AM

I've just been waiting for the spare time to build some boxes. This hobby has been on my mind for some time (like a few years).

One day...........


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#5 Myc

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 09:00 AM

cool, I'll be giving it a read soon

I saw this article on the web http://firstwefeast....eat/weed-honey/

really interesting if you ask me  :biggrin:

 

That story was de-bunked. 

The buds were doctored with a sugar solution. A bee expert went to some lengths to explain and demonstrate.

At first, I thought it was cool too.



#6 Heirloom

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 10:52 AM

I have wanted to raise bees for some years now ,but I am in a city and don't know if the city will allow it.

I have joked to a few people that I want one in my from yard with a buzzer in the hive for unwanted people so when they hit my buzzer the bees come out to run them off. Of course I would never do that.


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#7 Myc

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 11:51 AM

I have wanted to raise bees for some years now ,but I am in a city and don't know if the city will allow it.

I have joked to a few people that I want one in my from yard with a buzzer in the hive for unwanted people so when they hit my buzzer the bees come out to run them off. Of course I would never do that.

 

It's better to beg forgiveness than to ask permission.

 

A Friend of mine has had two hives on his roof for years. Nobody knows about it and the bees aren't telling. Heck, I never knew for years until he took me up there and showed me one day. We hung out in the back yard, had gatherings, bike rides weekly, did work on his house----- for several years. I never knew. All I knew was that he had some of the best apricot honey I had ever tried. 

 

Just don't post a sign or wear your bee costume in the open where prying eyes can see. Who knows how those apricots got on those trees?

After all.........

"Peaches come from a can. They were put there by a man in a factory downtown."


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#8 Alder Logs

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 12:09 PM

Roofs will work well, as will any location where people don't pass too closely past the bees' takeoff and landing flight paths.  A sunny corner in a tall fenced back yard is good in most instances.   A six foot high fence around that corner will get them up and overhead in a short distance and conceal their presence as well. 


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#9 Juthro

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 02:13 PM

I have thought about keeping bees where I live, but from everything I read it seems difficult to over winter them in my environment.

#10 Myc

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 09:52 AM

So I am now in possession of a set of plans for a non-traditional hive design.

 

I'm really anxious to begin construction and have a few ideas I plan to incorporate. YouTube has been a pretty decent resource for learning materials. I watched a video of a fellow keeping hives throughout a season. He demonstrated how to segregate the queen using mechanical exclusion for honey production. He also demonstrated a mechanical method by which to exclude the workers from the honey storage when the time is right for simpler, disturbance-free harvesting. Lastly, he also demonstrated having some honey stores to give back to the hives during lean months in case they need something to tide them over for the winter.

 

All of the above-mentioned methods should be very easy to incorporate into my chosen hive design by constructing adaptations of the specialized panels used by the aforementioned apiarist in the videos. I'm absolutely positive that I can demonstrate an improvement in the interaction with the bees - which was the original idea of the hive.

 

Construction of the hive body will begin next week barring unforeseen delays.

 

I have some questions for the experienced folks here:

 

The plan is to attract or acquire native or feral bees. 

Many articles are very forceful in their advocacy for mite control - the use of insecticides and other chemical "treatments" for disease prevention/control.

My buddy has a hive and they haven't done so well in the past years.

 

Lay it on me.........

Am I going to be a bad-guy for not using this stuff?

 

And don't worry. I'm not going to try and start a hive this year. Unless advised otherwise, I'm going to start next spring when I spawn the garden so they'll have the best possible start-up.


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#11 CatsAndBats

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 10:12 AM

bees.jpg

 

 

I own and have read the above book. I 'highly' recommend it.


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#12 Skywatcher

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 10:29 AM

That is the best hive design I have seen @Myc. I love that the entire design is built on a hexagonal shape, the bees natural instinctive geometric hive chamber shape. I want one.....

I have saved that link, and also would like to add to my bees by maintaining a hive I can access. (unlike the current hive in a block wall in my yard where I gt to enjoy the bees, but never the honey)

 

I saw a massive dieoff about 6 years ago, but believe one of my neighbors sprayed insecticide over the wall on them. I have since informed the neighbors on each adjacent side that they are there, are not aggressive, and on my property. Please leave them alone.

 

San Francisco has started placing hives on rooftops of buildings to help the bees.

 

I seriously doubt anyone would know if I added a constructed hive in my yard, and have wanted to do so for some time. I would love to encourage the existing hive to colonise the new one, but have no idea how to entice them to do so...........


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#13 CatsAndBats

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 10:40 AM

Plus the all the rage flow hive:

http://www.honeyflow.com/

 

 

 

And it's detractors:

http://www.honeycolo...-the-flow-hive/



#14 Myc

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 11:01 AM

That looks like an engineering marvel - the flow hive.

 

It gives me a bad feeling at first glance. And the more I think about it, the worse I feel.

 

I'm still too new at this to have an opinion. 

My gut reaction is that the bees will be a part of my family - I may or may not harvest honey depending upon their disposition to my interaction with them. Like Skywatcher's bees in the block wall, I may just be building a bee condominium (and watching it like an ant farm). It would be a real honor if the bees move in, stay, and prosper. They will be my treasured guests as opposed to being viewed as producers of honey.


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#15 CatsAndBats

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 11:06 AM

It is in my 'end game' plan to have bees and beehives, but for now, I'll just read about them. I have enough projects..

 

All colony animals are so fascinating! Don't get me started on ants!

 

I couldn't resist myc: http://www.livescien...nt-species.html

 

 

alright back to bees..


Edited by catattack, 15 May 2016 - 11:34 AM.

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#16 Alder Logs

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 12:11 PM

CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder) has been bad around here with the timber companies and the NFH (Neighbor From Hell) being so herbicide happy.  I don't eat honey  but love the honey bees.  I kept them 40 years ago and built my own movable frame hives back then.  Those are all gone now.  We have had a couple known bee trees on the place and while they have been wiped out repeatedly with CCD, new swarms keep finding them, though we are down to one tree at present, an American Chestnut well over 100 years old.  I built a Russian style hive that I would never rob, but as a place for a swarm to move in.  If I ever get one, I will build more.  It is round, made from staves I made with my bandsaw mill (alder, of course).  It's sitting under the chestnut tree waiting for it to produce an early swarm, as it does every year.  The bees must have a space issue in there. 

 

I absolutely loved the Cathedral Hive.  Wonderful!  Maybe I could get a franchise to manufacture kits for them when I finally get my shop built. 

 

I have gut issues about the Flow Hive as well.  I just watched these two videos on that.  I felt the poster, Frederick Dunn, was an unbiased reporter.

 

[Direct Link]


 

[Direct Link]


Edited by Alder Logs, 15 May 2016 - 12:14 PM.

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#17 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 05:56 PM

Bee Balm or Lemon Balm can be used to attract bees into swarm traps.

 

There are only certain times of the season that bees will swarm and its usually in the spring when they

get the biggest swarm, then cast out a few extra smaller ones, but during a honey flow(when flowers are producing 

a lot of nectar and pollen) bees can swarm is they get crowded in their hive or whatever cavaty they are in. 

 

I was going to get bees this year, but held off.

 

Ended up buying this book and reading it, ill be frank.. the book sucked ass... learned nothing different then

what I was able to find for free online, I have a feeling most other books will bee the same, (pun intended lol)

518DMVLdmjL._SX384_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

 

 

Im going to check out the book Cat mentioned, looks like a good one. 

 

 

I really like that hive design too though, I remember running into that one when I was doing a lil

more intensive study on the beekeeping subject.  

Also those Flow Thru honey harvester things Alder posted, EPIC

if you just wanna harvest honey and if they really are that simple,

the youtube videos Ive seen seem to suggest they are.

 

 

Ive also noticed the very very strict notions the "bee experts" have.  It kind of makes me wonder though..

have we really reached a point that its NECESSARY to use miticides and what not. 

Because the local people Ive talked to and a lot of stuff online, people REALLY REALLY press the whole..

"Make sure you register your hives and tell your city all about it and get the local bee experts on your side

so you can ask them any questions you need"

 

Its like.. my personally... I just dont jive right with that kind of "forceful recommendation"  lol

 

 

 

 

Ill be lurking around for all you bee hive starters out there, as this year.. im adding a 600 plant

perennial flower garden portion to the garden this year so next year I have a nice VERY LOCAL

flower supply for my bees.   Not to mention the mycelium in the spring time too, bees LOVE mycelium. 

 

Ill be harvesting honey from my bees because I want multiple sources of high concentrated glucose, 

Maple Syrup, Honey, Mole Asses,  Sophgum(spelling??)  etc..etc..

Not just for me... but for more importantly THE BEES and the rest of my animals.

You can use all those sugars to make ferments of every variety that can benefit every animal and bug and

microbe. 

LAB  and BIM... amazing stuff.

 

 

Great Post Myc.  Saved that link :)


Edited by Il19z8rn4li1, 15 May 2016 - 06:03 PM.

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#18 CatsAndBats

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 06:09 AM

 

 

Ended up buying this book and reading it, ill be frank.. the book sucked ass... learned nothing different then

what I was able to find for free online, I have a feeling most other books will bee the same, (pun intended lol)

attachicon.gif518DMVLdmjL._SX384_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

 

 

It's PUN for the whole family!



#19 Myc

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 08:38 AM

Thank you for the book review. I'm guilty of always running out to buy a book on a given subject. 

The .pdf linked by the OP is a pretty good read so far. 

 

I've still been studying with YouTube. Lots of interesting videos - bait hives, attracting feral colonies, one-way exclusion methods for extraction of existing bee populations, ............Strangely, this is a bit like learning fungal propagation with its tips, tricks, do-s and don't-s 

Many of the beekeepers discuss the different "seasons" of honey from nectar importation, storage, relocation, dehydration

 

Watch carefully the videos linked by Alder Logs - 

A bona-fide wood-worker takes a craftsman's look at the construction of the Flow Hive and gives a fair, arbitrary review.

In looking at the ability to tap the cells - I'm horrified. The end-user cannot observe the condition of the honey prior to tapping. I'm guessing that the uniform tapping of all of the cells in the setup will likely damage the brood. I'm just going to express the essence of my thoughts right here: The Flow Hive used for honey production is like chaining a human being to a knot-hole in a fence for sexual purposes. Yep - that's my opinion on the idea - with all of its horrific implications. I won't be using one and I'll express my inflammatory opinion to anyone who is using one of these contraptions. 

My mind goes to all of the damage which can occur.

I'm watching the habits of bees and unless the queen is excluded - she lays eggs in all of the available combs. The arbitrary wrenching-open of these cells - wholesale - looks like it would damage any potential future life in the form of the brood. Additionally, an under-informed user might not know the proper timing on "tapping" the honey stores. The honey may not have properly dehydrated. Or.......what if the hive is not doing so well. One could potentially tap vital food resources necessary for the survival of the colony. This just looks like a bad idea and reminds me of slave trading.

 

I spent some hours watching various videos and I'm anxious to get started on my journey. Still watching - still learning.

 


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#20 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 09:59 AM

I agree, I like to be a lil more personable with my fellow garden creatures and I wouldnt want

to just ROB them

of their honey without them knowing it...

 

As the caps of the honey are not broken but the back end are, so the bees cant really now the cells are

empty unless they open them up. 

 

 

Personally, I think it would be more fun to collect honey the old fashion way.


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