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Shadow's Kitchen


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#1 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 08:47 AM

I started a topic like this already, but it was suggested to me that this would be a better location.  There's a couple "dishes" on that other post already and rather than repost and delete them....

 

https://mycotopia.ne...s-where-i-cook/

 

Who likes Mexican food?

 

 

Enchiladas in this case.   The photos aren't the greatest, and even in person these weren't pretty, but they were delicious. 

 

 

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#2 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:02 AM

First step, get some chilies.  I'm using guajillo chilies, but ancho works as well.  Ingredients:

 

Ancho or Guajillo chilies (or cans of enchilada sauce in a pinch, but I think the sauce is the best part)

Tortillas 

Cheese - Mild Cheddar, Mexican 'Mixes', or 'American'.

Sweet Vidalia Onions

Shredded Beef (optional), shredded Chicken (optional), any other 'optional' selection....  Spam!!  <a Monty Pythonism>

Hot Peppers (optional)

 

I'm gonna go through different ways to cook enchiladas - ways I've cooked them, ways my Grandmother, Mother, and Aunts cook them.  Then, you can try it your way.  

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#3 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:48 AM

For me, it's all about that sauce, 'bout that sauce, 'bout that sauce.  

 

Chile Anchos are the dried form of the Poblano.  Those are the ones my family uses, those are what I normally use.  But, this time I tried the Guajillo, it was a little spicier than the Ancho.  The preparation is the same for both.

 

Soak them in water overnight.  

The next day, I slice up the peppers with kitchen scissors, remove the stem and  bring that pot of peppers to a boil.  

My grandma would also slice them open first and scrap out the seed and membrane before cooking them. 

 

Cover, and turn heat down to a constant simmer for 2 - 12 hours. You can cook as long as you like, as long as you keep the water above the peppers.  A pressure cooker can be used, but I don't have that experience.   You're basically making a tomato sauce but with peppers.  This can be sped up by running the peppers through a blender once they're soft enuff.  You can also find bulk 'ancho powder' that can be used almost immediately.  

 

After cooking the peppers you may still find chucks of pepper 'skin', seeds and 'stuff'.  I run it through a strainer after a couple hours of cooking, right before I get ready to cook down the sauce.  My grandma just 'fishes' out the skins and tosses them into the compost jar.

 

Add spice to taste with: ground cumin, garlic, onion, chili powder, roasted cumin seed, and/or premixed 'taco seasoning'. 

 

Reduce heat to produce good steam without the boil.  Cook uncovered until sauce sticks to spoon without being thick, pasty or worse.


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#4 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:52 AM

Well, that's the sauce.  Go ahead and get those peppers soaking and I'll write more after I have lunch.  LOL  Talking about food makes one hungry.



#5 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:31 AM

My grandma's recipe
 
18 tortillas
1 cup fat
1 cup grated cheese
1 chopped onion
3 - 4 Tblsp. Ancho Chili Powder
Cumin seed
 
Simmer cumin seeds in 2 cups of water. Turn off heat and sprinkle chili powder on top of hot water.
Heat fat and fry each tortilla till soft. Then dip tortilla into hot water with chili. Place on plate and sprinkle with cheese and onion; roll like a cigarette, and place seam down in a baking dish. Cover with enchilada sauce and cheese.  Bake at 350 for 20 minutes or until cheese is bubbly.  


#6 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:32 AM

My mom's recipe

 

 
18 tortillas
1 cup fat
1 cup grated cheese
1 onion (diced)
1 lb fried hamburg
16 oz. can enchilada sauce, or 16 oz. can pizza or tomato sauce
 
Heat sauce till very warm. Heat fat for frying. Fry each tortilla in hot fat till soft. Dip into sauce; place on plate and put a spoonful of meat, cheese and onion in center. Roll like a cigarette. Put parallel on platter or oblong pyrex baking dish. Sprinkle top with cheese and place in broiler till cheese melts.


#7 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:32 AM

 
The way they were traditionally made was outside, so they could be messy and fry the tortilla AFTER it's been dipped in the sauce.  That way it cooks the flavor of the sauce into the tortilla.  That's how I made them this last time.  They were delicious, and I left the greasy stove top till the next morning. 


#8 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:39 AM

I'm no expert, however my grandfather was half Aztec and half Spanish, and my grandmother half Mayan half German.  LOL.  

Me?  I was adopted.  I'm a 'generic' Mexican.  I'm actually mostly Scottish, but I couldn't tell you how to make Haggis.  "There can be only one"


Edited by Shadow_Wing, 30 March 2016 - 01:04 PM.


#9 Juthro

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:42 AM

Looks good Shadow, I love me some Mexican food :) It sounds really good my friend.

How many dried peppers (approximately) does it take to make the sauce?

EDIT: DDAMN!! Your a fast typer. You got in three or four posts there before I could get a cup of coffee and a piece of toast and finish mine, lol.

Thanks, and peace to you.

Edited by Juthro, 30 March 2016 - 10:44 AM.

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#10 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:53 AM

and my great-aunt's recipe for Chicken Enchiladas

 

Large chicken (3 - 4 lbs.)
1 pint sour cream
1 lb. shredded Monterey Jack cheese
1 can white enchilada sauce
2 cups chopped onion
3 cups chicken broth
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup oil or fat
2 dozen corn tortillas
 
Boil chicken until tender. Allow to cool, debone, and cut into small pieces.
 
Make sauce of heavy cream and chicken broth.
 
Mix sour cream and enchilada sauce together and pour over chicken.
 
Heat oil in skillet, and dip both sides of tortilla in hot oil to soften. Allow excess oil to run off, then dip into cream-broth mixture. 
Place a spoonful of chicken, a spoonful of onion, and a spoonful of cheese into center of tortilla.  Roll it up and place side by side on baking dish. 
 
Pour remainder of sauce over enchiladas and sprinkle with cheese.
 
Bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes


#11 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:57 AM

Looks good Shadow, I love me some Mexican food :) It sounds really good my friend.

How many dried peppers (approximately) does it take to make the sauce?

EDIT: DDAMN!! Your a fast typer. You got in three or four posts there before I could get a cup of coffee and a piece of toast and finish mine, lol.

Thanks, and peace to you.

LOL.  I've already had a pot of coffee, and a canna brownie/cake thingy.

The number of peppers is dependent on how strong you want the sauce to be.  I use about a dozen to 15 ancho in an average sized sauce pan, to produce about 3 cups of sauce.


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#12 Juthro

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 12:44 PM

Thanks Shadow, that's what I wanted to know :)
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#13 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 05:57 PM

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE  aka  SUNCHOKE

 

Freshly dug-up 'Sunchoke' aka Jerusalem Artichoke.  Grows indigenous to much of North America, and other places I can't currently recall.   This is the best time of year to harvest them (in my opinion), because they're not mushy, small, or bitter. 

 

The second picture is sauteed sunchoke (sliced thin), onion (diced), baby portabella mushroom, garlic, salt and pepper for a couple minutes then a splash of white wine or cooking sherry. Continue at low temp until little to no liquid is left.  Mmmmm.

 

Thirdly, I cooked this 2 nights ago..... Sauteed Sunchoke and Beef with 2 types of specialty cheeses and horse-radish.  And, bullshit aside,  the sunchoke was the most interesting part of that meal. 

 

Jerusalem Artichoke was named that, possibly by a French explorer to the 'New World', and discovered the root (apparently, taught by an Indian/Native American to save frenchy from starving.   He then made it into a business venture and shipped it back to Europe as a tender root when cooked it had  an 'Artichoke flavor'.   I find it to have a mildly sweet taste with a nutty taste as well.  I harvested it in the Winter once, and the outer 'skin' was very bitter.  I've never gotten bitter skin when harvested at the end of Winter to middle Spring.   I don't know the etymology of the name 'Sunchoke', but after watching it grow densely over my head, I thought, It sure 'chokes' out the 'sun'.   

 

Warning to the wise, before you think about letting this extremely prolific, hardy, likes to be the dominate crop, did I mention prolific?  My present patch was started from a single 2 inch long tuber section that he wrapped in a damp paper towel and mailed to me.   My current patch is approx. 1 foot wide and 12 feet long.  It is up against the side of my garage behind it, and a weekly mower in front of it; and I can keep it from evicting me from my own land that way.

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Edited by Shadow_Wing, 30 March 2016 - 05:57 PM.


#14 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 06:38 PM

Now, I'll jump back to the Enchiladas.  More specifically, the sauce.

 

I prepare the guajillo or ancho chile the same way I mentioned above.  I use about 15 to 20 dried chilies in a sauce pan about a 2 gallon, just cover the chilies with water.   Then after I've cooked the chilies to mush - around a couple hours on a medium boil.  I strain out seed, membrane, chili skin and begin to cook down the liquid into a thicker sauce.  I get it to a strong simmer to get the liquid down to half, then I lower it a bit for the last half.  

 

It's after I strain out the chili remains that I add my spice.  I like to get brown cumin seed and gently roast/sautee in a little oil for about 15 minutes or until the seed is tender enough to crush easily with a utensil.  For about 3 cups of cooked down sauce I use about 1 tablespoon of cumin seed and the same of oil.

Crush the seed after roasting and add this to your chili enchi-sauce.  Sometimes I cook a couple cloves of minced garlic along with the cumin seed. 

 

I mostly taste-test while cooking, so I add spices as I desire after I've added the cumin and garlic.

Other spices I've used in enchilada sauce is onion powder, chili powder (but that's essentially what the ancho is), salt, black pepper, any variety of overtly hot peppers that would even cause the devil himself to repent from the heat

 

I recently tried a new spice for me called "Harissa" seasoning, an ethnic North-African mix of spices.  This particular brand I bought contained many of the obvious chili style mix, it's everything I already mentioned.    And while this one spice doesn't list it, it tastes like it has cumin in it as well.  I guess it would be one of the "other natural spices".   This Harissa "cumin" taste that I detect is different somehow from regular brown cumin.  I wonder if it uses the 'black' cumin that grows around India, and East Asian, North Africa, and New Orleans gumbo  (just kidding).

 

I like my sauce to coat any spoon and not run off, but more like molasses.    Then after all those wonderful flavors have simmered together long enough to blend well, I get another skillet of hot oil (lately it was grape-seed oil), about a pinky deep, and get ready to move fast.  Another pair of hands is a wonderful thing.



#15 Shadow_Wing

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 06:59 PM

I use corn tortilla because of the flavor.  I use a pair of short tongs and drop a tortilla into the warm enchilada sauce then I flip it and get it on the other side. Both sides should be completely covered in sauce.  Then I hold it for a few seconds to let any excess drip off, and then into the hot oil for a few seconds of fry, then flip and a couple more seconds;  it's just enough to get that sauce fried into the tortilla and make it soft to bend and roll.

 

Hold the edge with the tongs and let oil drip off, then lay it on a plate and fill with whatever is your heart's content.  I like onion, cheese, and more peppers.

 

The sauce that is left over after you've dipped all you can dapp, can be poured over enchiladas before baking them, or served at the time of presentation.   

 

I like to let them bake without any extra sauce and let the edges get a little crispy, then I use the extra sauce when it's time to eat.  I also like to put a little cold salsa on my enchilada when I eat them, so I don't always want too much sauce.  

 

There are many processed 'enchilada' sauces out there, and I've tried a few of them when I didn't want to wait for a brittle hard dried pepper to dissolve into mush.  That and curiosity.  I found one or two that I thought worked well as a base start to season as I like, or use straight outta the can for those who aren't into eating "food that hurst you", as a close friend of mine always says about anything spicy. 

 

Another barely acceptable shortcut is using dry 'Taco Seasoning" to get that Mexican flavor.  Most taco seasoning packages use cumin, onion, garlic, cilantro, chili powder, etc.  and some of them are balanced fairly well, just avoid those that have ingredients that seem to be written in another language. 


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