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#81 Needles

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Posted 20 November 2016 - 07:42 PM

Hey folks if you have been looking for a easy mushroom to grow and don't want to mess with oysters then try a strain of Hypsizygus. This brown Shimeji fruited nicely with no need of a casing. Shimeji is a mild nutty tasting mushroom that has a crisp texture almost like King oyster. I now believe that the photo above was a strain of H. marmoreus and not king. As the temperature dropped into the 60s 50s range all the strains of Hypsizygus started to pop. I found that the smaller caps had the best flavor. I added them to a pot roast and they were a hit. Substrate for shimeji is just nutritional sawdust that has been sterilized in filter patch bags. Hope you all get a chance to try to grow some....
image.jpeg
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#82 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 20 November 2016 - 10:15 PM

Nice grows Needles, you grow a wide variety.


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#83 Needles

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Posted 20 November 2016 - 10:34 PM

Nice grows Needles, you grow a wide variety.


Thanks Heirloom, Shimeji mushrooms are fun to grow and not bad tasting either. Plus the town I live in has no store or market that will offer these kind of mushrooms.....
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#84 Seeker2be

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 02:10 PM

The spawn has been in the bag for 2 months (Shitaki) and started to fruit.  I was told to leave them in the bag until the spawn turned brown but just couldn't do it. When I birthed a previous bag when fully colonized but white it just fell apart.  We shall see.  Any thoughts?

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#85 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 02:20 PM

Seeker your shitake look better than my PF  jars did.

I think they will do better when they turn brown - they call it barking over.

The best shitake I had was after barking over and the substrate held together good. I know its hard to wait.
My PF jars of sawdust wanted to fruit before barking over , I got shitake blobs. When they barked over I got
shitake that developed nicely.

 I got no info or advise as I am a beginner.

 I think you have done pretty good and its nice to see you here.

 



#86 Needles

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 02:26 PM

They look good Seeker. I would put that block in a clear tote with the lid off and just keep misting it. Your mushrooms will get bigger and that block will start to turn brown. Nice work getting a nice shiitake grow.


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#87 Seeker2be

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 03:28 PM

Thanks for the advice .  Will keep the top off the tote and see what happens!!!


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#88 CatsAndBats

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 03:38 PM

They look good Seeker. I would put that block in a clear tote with the lid off and just keep misting it. Your mushrooms will get bigger and that block will start to turn brown. Nice work getting a nice shiitake grow.

 

 

Thanks for the advice .  Will keep the top off the tote and see what happens!!!

 

 

Look what the cat dragged in!

 

We could use y'all on the boards more often!


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#89 Seeker2be

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 06:05 PM

Thanks.  I am still working away on processes but never giving up.


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#90 Seeker2be

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 03:03 PM

Homakua mushroom Tour (big island Hawaii) experience and gleans

 

The company grows 5000 lbs of Pleurotus Erygynii (King Oyster mushrooms) per week supplying restaurants in the Hawaiian islands.

Substrate is 75% hard wood sawdust (eucalyptus), 25% corn cob dust, 5% wheat bran and 65% water.

Jars (plastic ) reusable are used but wide mouth jars could be used. Sterilization 1 hour

A vertical middle hole is pushed into the mixed substrate to allow spawn to be placed after sterilization

Sterilization 1 hour

40 days colonization 75 degrees

10 days for fruiting 65 degrees.

On opening jars to initiate colonization they scrape the top off.

Jars are kept at 45 degree angle to spill off CO2 and then upright after pinning begins.

They only do one flush per jar though 3 are possible.  3 jars yield about 1 lb of mushrooms

 

Plastic Jars and caps from Japan (though wide mouth mason jars would work)

 

IMG_5443.JPG

IMG_5444.JPG

 

Eucalyptus sawdust, Corn Cob dust, and Bran

 

IMG_5445.JPG

 

Substrate Mixer

 

IMG_5446.JPG

 

Sterilizer

 

IMG_5447.JPG

 

Machine to fill jars with substrate, make central holes and cap

 

IMG_5448.JPG

 

Central hole for inoculation

 

IMG_5465.JPG

 

 

Vegatative period

 

IMG_5457.JPG

 

Fruiting stage with angle of jars for CO2 Spill

 

IMG_5468.JPG

 

 

 

 

Product

 

IMG_5451.JPG

IMG_5475.JPG

 

 

Ways to use: Cubesd in soups, Thin with meat or cooked in salads, mock scallops

 

IMG_5478.JPG

IMG_5483.JPG

 

Sesame oil, soy sauce, onions, rice noodles and round sliced king oysters

 

IMG_5481.JPG

 

 

 
"Pleurotus eryngii
King Oyster


Pleurotus eryngii is by far the best tasting Oyster mushroom, well deserving of the title, the King Oyster. Popular in Europe, this stout, thickly fleshed mushroom, is one of the largest species in the genus. Preferring hardwoods, this mushroom is easy to grow. Although this mushroom grows on cereal (wheat) straws, the yields are not as substantial as that of Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus pulmonarius on this same material, at the same rate of spawning, unless supplements are added or a unique spawning method is employed.

Mycelial Characteristics: Whitish, longitudinally radial at first, sometimes rhizomorphic, soon thickening and becoming cottony in age.

Microscopic Features: This mushroom produces white spores.

Suggested Agar Culture Media: Malt Yeast Peptone Agar (MYPA) or Potato Dextrose Yeast Agar (PDYA).

Spawn Media: Rye, wheat, sorghum, milo, or millet.

Substrates for Fruiting: Most hardwoods, wheat straw, and cottonseed hulls or wheat bran support fruitings. Currently most grow this on hardwood fuel pellets with 10-20 % Wheat Bran. This mushroom is not as adaptive as P. pulmonarius and P. ostreatus to a broad range of substrates. Nevertheless, many materials can be used. It seems to perform well on recycled, re-sterilized waste Shiitake substrate. However, it is not recommended for commercial purposes unless the preferred wood type or alternative substrate materials were exceedingly scarce or cost-prohibitive. If cultivation this mushroom on wheat straw, the addition of 5-10% cottonseed meal reportedly has the greatest effect in enhancing yield.

Yield Potentials: 1 lb. or mushrooms per 5 lbs. of sterilized sawdust/chips/bran. Wheat straw fruitings, in some experiences, have tallied approximately 1/2 of that from enriched sawdust. The stage at which the mushrooms are picked significantly affects yield efficiencies.

---Growth Parameters---

Spawn Run:

  • Incubation Temperature: 75* F (24* C)
  • Relative Humidity: 90-95%
  • Duration: 12-16 days
  • CO2: 5000-20,000 ppm
  • Fresh Air Exchanges: 1 per hour
  • Light Requirements: n/a

Primordia Formation:

  • Initiation Temperature: 50-60* F (10-15* C)
  • Relative Humidity: 95-100%
  • Duration: 4-5 days ( allow to pin in the bag before opening)
  • CO2: 500-1000 ppm
  • Fresh Air Exchanges: 4-8 per hour
  • Light Requirements: 500-1000 lux

Fruitbody Development:

  • Temperature: 60-70* F (15-21* C)
  • Relative Humidity: 85-90%
  • Duration: 4-8 days
  • CO2: <2000 ppm ( Co2 concenteration will greatly affect shape of the mushroom. 2-4 exchanges per day will give fat long stems while higher FAE will give short stems with larger caps) 
  • Fresh Air Exchanges: 4-5 per hour (see above)
  • Light Requirements: 500-1000 lux

Cropping Cycle:

  • 45 days, two crops, 14 days apart"

 


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#91 Needles

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 04:34 PM

Nice write up Seeker, looks like you had another fun and educational experience. Thank you for sharing....

#92 Seeker2be

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 05:50 PM

If you are not moving forward then you are moving backwards......


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#93 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 01:56 PM

Seeker you need a TV show , like the Mushroom Traveler or some catchy title. Public TV , National Geographic , a Food channel, Discovery ..ect.
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#94 Seeker2be

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 02:38 PM

Thanks Heirloom!!!   I still have a lot to learn and might be embarrassed on gaps or ongoing mistakes in my techniques if someone were to see them.  What I would really wish for is for some of you to come to my home or to go to your home (mi casa es tu casa ) and brain storm in critique of practices or accidentally learn from what I or you do.  This forum is not 3 dimentional enough for dyslexics like me.  We need to share best practices in person and THEN write up best route to each mushroom.  As a bonus in October wild mushrooms abound in forest settings that are magical.

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Edited by Seeker2be, 25 February 2017 - 02:55 PM.

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#95 Arathu

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 11:32 AM

Cool thread.............I'm stoked for this coming year.....me and the edible mushrooms are going to get along just fine I think....

 

Bags......I gotta start thinking about grow bags................and a big ass sterilizer.................

 

Beauty...... :meditate:

 

A


Edited by Arathu, 17 March 2017 - 11:35 AM.

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#96 Ferather

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 11:45 AM

Nice thread, and nice work everyone.


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#97 Brutkkus

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Posted Yesterday, 12:53 AM

 

Homakua mushroom Tour (big island Hawaii) experience and gleans

 

The company grows 5000 lbs of Pleurotus Erygynii (King Oyster mushrooms) per week supplying restaurants in the Hawaiian islands.

Substrate is 75% hard wood sawdust (eucalyptus), 25% corn cob dust, 5% wheat bran and 65% water.

Jars (plastic ) reusable are used but wide mouth jars could be used. Sterilization 1 hour

A vertical middle hole is pushed into the mixed substrate to allow spawn to be placed after sterilization

Sterilization 1 hour

40 days colonization 75 degrees

10 days for fruiting 65 degrees.

On opening jars to initiate colonization they scrape the top off.

Jars are kept at 45 degree angle to spill off CO2 and then upright after pinning begins.

They only do one flush per jar though 3 are possible.  3 jars yield about 1 lb of mushrooms

 

Plastic Jars and caps from Japan (though wide mouth mason jars would work)

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5443.JPG

attachicon.gifIMG_5444.JPG

 

Eucalyptus sawdust, Corn Cob dust, and Bran

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5445.JPG

 

Substrate Mixer

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5446.JPG

 

Sterilizer

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5447.JPG

 

Machine to fill jars with substrate, make central holes and cap

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5448.JPG

 

Central hole for inoculation

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5465.JPG

 

 

Vegatative period

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5457.JPG

 

Fruiting stage with angle of jars for CO2 Spill

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5468.JPG

 

 

 

 

Product

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5451.JPG

attachicon.gifIMG_5475.JPG

 

 

Ways to use: Cubesd in soups, Thin with meat or cooked in salads, mock scallops

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5478.JPG

attachicon.gifIMG_5483.JPG

 

Sesame oil, soy sauce, onions, rice noodles and round sliced king oysters

 

attachicon.gifIMG_5481.JPG

 

 

 

Great info Seeker , because I am reading a lot about King oyster this way("Asian way") but with small differences, I will do it in bags without the filter patch , but with plastic neck and filter on top of PP bag, like they do , again , in Asia.

 

So I am interested with every information about control of shape of King Oyster with big stem and small cap. On first place is control of CO2 what you describe on your pictures(opposite to normal oyster) , but after all I red , that is important if we talk about what human can control , but in the end maybe most important to get right strain and that arent strains from European/US labs..you get mushroom like this:

w_m2600_op_vel_websiteformaat.jpg

 

and it is important to have right strain to get King oyster like this, ofcourse with controlling environment like  CO2:

 

pleurotus-eryngii-king-oyster-mushroom.j

 

 

 

 

So the plan is to get King oyster strain in 3 months and get this "Korean style" King , so I hope we have more people interesting in this topic and people with some experience. 


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#98 Seeker2be

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Posted Yesterday, 09:12 AM

The reason Hamakua  grew them in bottles is to avoid the plastic bag waste and inability to recycle.   They were automated with Japanese plastic bottles that were reuseable. .  IME growing in bags gives only a few oyster fruits and not worth the waste thus bottles.  There yield : 1 lb per 3 bottles but they didn't do a second flush....


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#99 Brutkkus

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Posted Today, 12:50 AM

The reason Hamakua  grew them in bottles is to avoid the plastic bag waste and inability to recycle.   They were automated with Japanese plastic bottles that were reuseable. .  IME growing in bags gives only a few oyster fruits and not worth the waste thus bottles.  There yield : 1 lb per 3 bottles but they didn't do a second flush....

 

Bottles are for big production..this is process..

https://www.youtube....h?v=iV_hOqEVrv0

 

, but Asia produce it in bags too, small bags cca 1L and substrate is compressed inside(same in bottles) and even people in Europe and US dont have good opinion about compressing it there are good things..it keep moisture ..not sure what is best to use as filter on top for substrate bags..is it fine to cut syntetic filter disc and use on substrate bags..not sure about that? Here picture maybe someone thought about this..

 

Substrate bags should look like this in the end..

mushroom-grow-bag-1471856054-0.jpg

 

-Inside black plastic they have originally white filter diameter 3,8cm, so can SFD be used for substrate bags??

-And if using this trays , somone think its problem that they touch each other and heat each other..because this trays looks practical?






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