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Greenscapes achieved with moss graffiti/art in Philly and Brooklyn


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#1 CatsAndBats

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 09:30 AM

I've been wanting to do this for some time, original content found here:

http://inhabitat.com...y-edina-tokodi/

 

 

 

 

Philly Goes Green with Moss Installation by Edina Tokodi DESIGN

 

 

 

VIEW SLIDESHOW

 

One of our favorite green public artistsEdina Tokodi, is at it once again with her shape-shifting moss graffiti and urban guerrilla tactics. Tokodi was recently commissioned by SEPTA (Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority) to encourage Philadelphia’s commuters to ‘Go Green’ with her navigable moss icons and green walls in the Market East Station’s passenger service area, ticketing area, and on the exterior of the station building and Transportation Museum. The initiative is part of SEPTA’s mission to help commuters become more aware of the positive environmental impact of using mass transit regularly.

 

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Philly’s effort to ‘Go Green’ via ‘moss transit’ might be just the way to start another American Revolution. We hope that other cities nationwide will soon be eager to get on board and take the green express as well!

 

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In a recent interview with Edina, the artist described that the ‘Go Green’ project took approximately one month of materials preparation. The installation’s opening coincided with the Philadelphia Flower Show, a popular time for increased traffic to and from the city. The artist and her collaborator, Jozsef Valyi-Toth, used “100% natural sheet moss”, turf-like plant matter grown explicitly for decoration and design purposes. Given that this material is already well-preserved, the exhibit’s pieces will remain green for at least a month and a half. (Additional watering apparently makes the work brighter green and puffy in texture.) It is a goal of the artist to soon employ bio-matter that requires dedicated watering, nurturing, and ongoing cultivation.

The actual installation of the moss icons and signage took one week of working non-stop, around the clock. This included creating custom-fitted moss inserts for 32 SEPTA posters (10 inches by 10 inches) and 40 pieces that fit into the SEPTA logos throughout the site. Edina and Jozsef also made two ‘Go Green’ signs with each letter measuring 2 feet by 3 feet. Red Tettemer, the very hip advertising agency, also lent a hand in the communication design details for the project (check out the very cutevideo of the project’s installation process on their website).

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The ‘Go Green’ project seems to already have won over the hearts and minds of day-to-day commuters at East Market Station. According to SEPTA, the feedback thus far has been extremely positive with Tokodi’s moss icons being one of the most creative projects they have helped sponsor in a very long time. It might be a while before we are able to grow vertical gardens and vegetable walls ala Patrick Blanc in ‘the underground’ or along the train tracks so to speak, but eco-minded public works are here to stay, and there may soon come a time when being on the ‘go-green-go’ may be one of the most-energy efficient and civic minded activities that we can collectively participate in.

+ Mosstika – Edina Tokodi
+ Urban Moss Graffiti by Edina Tokodi
+ SEPTA’s ‘Go Green’ in the Philadelphis Inquirer

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Edited by catattack, 29 May 2016 - 09:31 AM.

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#2 CatsAndBats

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 09:36 AM

Original content here: http://inhabitat.com...made-from-moss/     CLEAN GREEN LIVING GRAFFITI made from moss! DESIGN

 

We’ve covered reverse graffiti in the past on Inhabitat – a practice which involves creating street art by cleaning soot covered surfaces to inscribe them with images using scrub brushes, scrapers and pressure hoses. Now in Brooklyn we’ve discovered ‘living graffiti’ — an idea which takes the idea of clean graffiti to the next level by creating street art out of living, breathing plants.

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Eco-minded street artist Edina Tokodi is putting a new spin on green guerilla tactics in the trendy art enclave of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Tokodi’s site-specific moss installations of prancing animal figures and camouflage outgrowths are the talk of a local urban neighborhood typically accustomed to gallery hype and commercial real estate take-overs. Unlike the market-driven art featured in sterile, white box galleries, the work of Tokodi is meant to be touched, felt, and in turn touch you in the playful ways that her animated installations call to mind a more familiar, environmentally friendly state in the barren patches of urban existence.

 

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Tokodi believes strongly that the reactions of passersby (or the lack of any reaction at all) is really an indicator of a deeper malaise that we need to pay attention to and reseed with “mentally healthy garden states” and direct interactive engagement.

 

The artist states:

“I think that our distance from nature is already a cliché. City dwellers often have no relationship with animals or greenery. As a public artist I feel a sense of duty to draw attention to deficiencies in our everyday life. As a cultivator of eco-urban sensitivity, I usually go back to the sites to visit my “plants” or “moss”, sometimes to repair them a bit, but nothing more generally as they tend to get enough water from the air, condensation, and rain – especially in certain seasons. I also like to let them live by themselves. From the moment I put them on the street they start to have their own life. For me, the reaction of life on the street is also very important. I am curious about how people receive them, if they just leave them alone, or if they want to, take care of them or dismantle them. This is what makes my work similar to graffiti, although I am searching for a deeper social meaning and a dialogue with memories of the animals and gardens of my past in a small town in Central Europe. I believe that if everyone had a garden of their own to cultivate, we would have a much more balanced relation to our territories. Of course, a garden can be many things.”

Edina Tokodi studied graphic art and design at the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts and also completed urban design course work in Milan, Italy. Her work can be seen on the streets of Williamsburg, Brooklyn and in unexpected outcroppings on a street near you.

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#3 CatsAndBats

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 09:45 AM

This is a more detailed how to (as opposed to wikihow or whatever)

Original here:http://www.stencilre...ake-moss-graffiti/

 

 

 

 

How to Make Moss Graffiti – The Step by Step “Grow” Guide

Before getting into our guide on making moss graffiti, let’s talk about the impact of paint in the graffiti world. Obviously paint is not the most environmentally friendly medium for artistic expression. A significant number of these products contain substances that may be harmful to the environment such as lead, cadmium, formaldehyde, CFCs in paint spray, and many other similarly toxic substances. An alternative to using paint is to use moss instead. This medium is not only ecologically sound but also grows with time.

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Choosing The Right Spot

Areas that are exposed to the sun throughout the day are not conducive for moss growth. Moss needs some amount of sunlight in order to survive. Because moss is technically a plant, the area also needs to be moist enough to allow the moss access to sufficient water to grow. A wall inside the house may also be used as long as it satisfies these criteria. If the spot does not receive light from the sun, one or more light bulbs may be used to simulate sunlight.

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Planning The Graffiti Piece

Good artwork takes careful preparation. A site for the graffiti should first be selected. The site should be made of material that is porous enough to allow the moss to take root. A tentative plan on how it will look should then be etched on the chosen wall using chalk. This will ensure that what is put up is not haphazard or amateurish but something that will add an artistic ambiance to the area.

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Gathering The Materials

moss-materials.jpgOnce a tentative plan has been chalked out, it is now time to collect the materials needed to churn out the moss paint”. The most important ingredient is moss. About a handful or at least two clumps of it would be enough but having more would not be bad. Moss is not really hard to find. It is common in most places that receive some amount of sunlight such as the wall of fence. If you do need to purchase some supplies, take a look at our coupon code page for Dick Blick to save a few bucks.

 

*Two cups of buttermilk is also needed (Yogurt may be used as a substitute).
*1 half a teaspoon of sugar
*2 cups of water (beer may also be used instead),
*A standard Blender
*Paintbrush
*Container for the finished product
*Corn syrup may also be needed in certain cases to increase the consistency

Preparing The Moss For Processing

Wash the moss carefully. Make sure that bits of soil found on its roots are completely removed, or at least as much of it as possible. The clumps of moss are then broken apart even further into smaller pieces. This will make it more manageable and easier for the blender to work on.

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Mixing It All Together

Place the washed, broken up moss in the blender. Add the two cups of buttermilk, the two cups of water, and the half teaspoon of sugar. Blend this mixture until it is completely smooth. Now, use the paintbrush to test the consistency of the blended mixture. If it drips like paint with too much moisture, add corn syrup then blend the mixture again. Repeat this step until sufficiently viscous consistency is achieved. If the mixture becomes too thick, this can easily be remedied by adding water.

Once the moss paint mixture has the desired consistency, transfer it into another container with a lid. Seal it for the time being until a sufficient amount of this paint” mixture is produced. If the mixture is to be used later, store it in the refrigerator.

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Applying The Moss Paint

A paintbrush it the most common means of applying the moss mixture on the wall. Spraying it onto the wall is another method. The moss, however, often does not take hold as quickly as when a paintbrush is used. The moss being used as paint” is a living thing. The harsher method of spraying it on the wall will not help it take root effectively. Using a paintbrush is a gentler way to apply the mixture.

Stencils may also be used to create a precise image or graffiti. These could be cut from waste cardboard lying around the house into any shape desired. Another method is to cover the whole surface with moss paint”, allow it to take root and grow, then trim or remove portions of it to produce the graffiti piece. A dull knife or even a piece of hard wood may be used to accomplish this. Some people use high pressure water hoses but this requires more expertise and a steadier hand. And who knows, you could be the next Banksyof moss graffiti art.

Once the graffiti is completed, store the excess in the refrigerator. This will ensure that a ready supply is at hand for use on days when an additional coat of moss needs to be added.

Helping The Moss Take Root And Thrive

The first couple of weeks are critical. The moss graffiti should be misted using a water spray once every other day to keep it moist. On days when it is not to be misted with water, apply an additional coat of moss paint” mixture. The best time to put up a moss graffiti are the spring and fall seasons. There is sufficient moisture in the air so misting or applying a new coat of moss paint” may be done once a week. Monitor the moss graffiti on a regular basis to ensure it stays moist. This will encourage its growth.

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Removing Moss Graffiti

limes-remove-moss-graffiti.jpgWhen one becomes bored of the mural or tag, scraping off the moss will not do. Small particles of it may still remain to reproduce. The most efficient way to completely remove moss is to spray it with lime juice. This will kill the moss and effectively remove it from the medium. The graffiti can also be modified this way. Use a stencil so only the areas where moss is to be removed is exposed.

In Summary

Moss graffiti is not difficult to accomplish. It does need careful planning like any artistic endeavor. Time is also needed to make the moss paint mixture and ensure that the moss takes root and grows properly. The refreshing appeal and ecological soundness of the graffiti piece produced is well worth the trouble though.

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Edited by catattack, 29 May 2016 - 11:35 AM.

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#4 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 01:27 PM

lol before I read the whole thing, I was just gonna say...

 

take some milk and moss.. blend them... strain it.. and put it in a pump sprayer.

 

Spray any north facing wall and BAMO hahah

 

 

its pretty epic prank stuff too.. lol  you can completely cover someones patio with moss hahaha or drive way.


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#5 niemandgeist

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 08:09 PM

I remember seeing this years ago on Reddit.com. You already posted a "How to" for moss graffiti. It's not that complicated. I may give it a go one of these days, myself.

 

Very neato to be able to make your mark on society without actually damaging anything. You'll actually be nurturing life!


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#6 sillyrabbitcubiesR4us

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 08:46 AM

I've always loved seeing these online, and being the DIY-er that I am, I tried this at my last apartment about a month before I left. i forgot about it, on the back side of the trash compactor housing, where I also planted all my tomato clones, etc.  I will have to go back and see if it's still there.

 

I have been a graffiti artist since I was 13, and one of my favorite tags of mine since then has been with a mushroom in it. (go figure) I'll have to start throwing moss mushrooms everywhere I go. Watch.


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#7 CatsAndBats

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 08:58 AM

I've always loved seeing these online, and being the DIY-er that I am, I tried this at my last apartment about a month before I left. i forgot about it, on the back side of the trash compactor housing, where I also planted all my tomato clones, etc.  I will have to go back and see if it's still there.

 

I have been a graffiti artist since I was 13, and one of my favorite tags of mine since then has been with a mushroom in it. (go figure) I'll have to start throwing moss mushrooms everywhere I go. Watch.

Get busy!



#8 happy4nic8r

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 11:51 AM

been doing that since 1971 when I was at UC berkeley.

 

Took home a little bit  every day and grew it in the shower. almost complete when I moved. 


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