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#21 ethnobotanist420

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 11:48 PM

Yes, Wilde! You got them all... Here is an interesting bit about each one:

 

Sacred tobacco is used to make smoke, is one of the most sacred of plants for Native people. It is said to be the main activator of all plants. It was given to us so that we can communicate with the Spirit world and when you use it, all things begin to happen. Tobacco is always offered before picking medicines. When you offer tobacco to a plant and explain your reasons for being there, the plant will let all the plants in the area know your intentions and why you are picking them, tobacco is used first as an offering for everything and in every ceremony. Going to ceremonies you would offer tobacco to the Elder leading those ceremonies along with an honoring gift. This announces your intention and the Elders may ask you of your intentions with this offering.

Sweet grass is the sacred hair of Mother Earth; its sweet aroma reminds people of the gentleness, love and kindness she has for the people; this is why Native people pick it and braid it in 3 strands representing love, kindness and honesty. Sweet grass is used for smudging and purification of the spirit; when Sweet grass is used in a healing or talking circle it has a calming effect. It is said that it attracts the good Spirit, so use it to call in the Spirit.

Sage is used in many different ways, it helps the people prepare for ceremonies and teachings. Because it is more medicinal and stronger than Sweet grass, it tends to be used more often in ceremonies, it also has physical healing properties, you can boil sage and drink it as a tea. Sage is for releasing what is troubling the mind and for removing negative energy, it is used for cleansing homes and sacred items. There is male and female sage.

Like Sage and Sweet grass, cedar is used to purify the home, it also has many restorative medicinal use. When mixed with sage for a tea, it cleans the body of all infections, cedar baths are also very healing. When cedar mixed with tobacco is put in the fire it crackles, this is said to call the attention of the Spirits to the offering that is being made. Cedar is used in sweat lodge and fasting ceremonies for protection, cedar branches cover the floor of many sweat lodges and some people make a circle of cedar when they are fasting. It is a guardian spirit and chases away the bad spirits

 

From here:
http://www.dancingto...g/medicines.php

 

Ps: Wilde... you are VERY good with your plants... do you think that the photos I posted are indeed Artemisia Ludoviciana?

 

Thanks for your input :)

-Ethno


Edited by ethnobotanist420, 07 June 2016 - 11:54 PM.

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#22 Coopdog

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 01:56 AM

Yep Sky that is what I buy and have also grown before. Regrettably we had a bad winter that year and it did not come back :( The store I go to is a very small native owned store and the things they sell are not marketed whatsoever and only go to people who have been sent there by word of mouth. They sold the store a few years ago and got such an uproar from the customers that they negotiated to buy it back from the new owner, who was not making a go of it at all. Everyone had come to depend on the simplicity and integrity of the owners and chose not to participate in the new fully stocked herbal store that they had made it into. They sell lots of ceremonial things, and all of their sacred herbs are indeed sourced very selectively, the sage in particular so as to leave it in a condition to be used for spiritual things.

 

I saved that link Sky, so payday I can make another go at getting this going as a perennial. I have a friend who has some that are years old and come back every year bigger than ever so I think it can be done successfully. Thank you all!


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#23 Alder Logs

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 08:03 AM

Can anyone help me out here.   I would like to know where sweet grass can be found, specifically if it grows anywhere near where I am in the PNW.  I would like to know how to recognize it.  I know that on occasion I have smelled something that smells just like it here, but could never find the source of the smell.  The last braid of sweet grass I had was given to me in Glacier Park.  I had pulled my motorcycle over to the side of the road to wash my hair in a small waterfall when a small car with some Mi'kmaq people pulled over.  We had a short and very pleasant conversation and they gave me a braid of sweet grass.  I never burned it, but had it hung next to my pillow until it was totally dried out and falling apart. 

 

When I used to travel east of the mountains I would pick the common sage that grows all over the arid western lands.   I have not ever been drawn to use any sage I would have to purchase with money.   I have a general distrust of merchants.  


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#24 Baphom3t

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 09:30 AM

I burn silver and sedona sage almost everyday, and various other good smelling stuff like champa, patchouli, and other nepalese, tibetan and indian dhoops and incense.


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#25 MConchis

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 10:53 AM

I don't want to hijack the thread to talking about tobacco, but one more interesting thing about it and native culture.  It was often left because it was believed that tobacco held the memory of the thing that was taken.  So, you take down a deer, you would leave a gift of tobacco where it was taken to hold the memory of the deer.  It has been learned through studies that the nicotine in tobacco is a powerful memory enhancer and is used today in the study of Alzheimer's medicines as the control against which new medicines are tested.  In other words, is this medicine producing an effect that is better than nicotine.  

 

Back on track.  I smudge with sage and do the cleansing ritual when I go out to the shop to work.  I think it provides a nice "door" to pass through to separate one mental space from another and to become intentional about what is to come.   


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#26 ethnobotanist420

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 02:34 PM

I think it should grow where you are, Alder... It seems to be a very widespread plant...

Can anyone help me out here. I would like to know where sweet grass can be found, specifically if it grows anywhere near where I am in the PNW. I would like to know how to recognize it. I know that on occasion I have smelled something that smells just like it here, but could never find the source of the smell. The last braid of sweet grass I had was given to me in Glacier Park. I had pulled my motorcycle over to the side of the road to wash my hair in a small waterfall when a small car with some Mi'kmaq people pulled over. We had a short and very pleasant conversation and they gave me a braid of sweet grass. I never burned it, but had it hung next to my pillow until it was totally dried out and falling apart.

When I used to travel east of the mountains I would pick the common sage that grows all over the arid western lands. I have not ever been drawn to use any sage I would have to purchase with money. I have a general distrust of merchants.


I have never harvested sweetgrass myself but I have been reading a lot about it so I'll share what I have found so far... We are looking for Hierocloe Odorata so here is some information on it:

Hierochloe odorata is a very hardy perennial, able to grow to the Arctic Circle. Its leaves do not have rigid stems, so only grow to about 20 cm (7.9 in) in height, and then the leaves grow outward horizontally to 100 cm (39 in) long or more, by late summer. The base of the leaf, just below the soil surface, is broad and white, without hairs; the underside of the leaf is shiny, without hairs. In the wild, the bases of the leaves are frequently purple-red colored, and this indicates a phosphorus-deficient soil.[4]

In North America Hierochloe odorata occurs in southern Canada, northern Great Plains/Rocky Mountains and northwest of U.S., and New England.[6] In continental Europe it occurs north from Switzerland. There is only one site in Ireland, and it is recorded in four counties of Scotland



From: https://en.wikipedia...rochloe_odorata

some info on identification and where to look:


How do I identify Sweetgrass?

Many of us have only known Sweetgrass as a dried and braided product used in ceremonies. However, in its natural state, as an untamed grass, the easiest and most pleasant way to identify the plant is by its vanilla fragrance that comes from the leaves. Typically, the stem reaches two to three feet in height and has a white, stocky base. During its flowering stage, golden and purple, tulip-shaped flowers in patterns of three hang from the stem. The underside of the leaf is shiny, hairless and flat. There are four species of Sweetgrass, but the most common is the Western strand known as Hierochloe odorata, the most scented of the Sweetgrass species.

Where can I find it?

Although Sweetgrass is typically associated with Prairie landscapes, it is a plant that can exist across North America and Northern Europe below the Arctic Circle. In North America it grows regionally from Labrador to Alaska and south to Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Arizona, New Jersey and Washington. The natural growing environments are places such as moist meadows, stream banks, lakeshores and areas that have previously been cultivated for farming or other agricultural use. It is found less commonly in arid regions.

The perennial is better suited to moist, sandy soil, but will not produce in clay soil mixtures. Sweetgrass can flourish in full or partial sun.


I am terrible at IDing grasses but here is a picture of the flowers courtesy of wikipedia:

800px-Hierochloe_odorata_(USDA).jpg


Here is a good video of people picking sweetgrass and some info on it:

[Direct Link]



So I guess what we are looking for is a grass likely growing by water that has a vanilla scent, hairless leaves with shiny undersides and flowers that look like the one in the picture??

Thats all I got :/


Hope that helps,

-Ethno




EDIT:


Sorry for the wird font change halway throught the post... I'm having issues today lol could a mod give me a hand fixing the font colour when you have a chance? Thanks :)

Edited by ethnobotanist420, 08 June 2016 - 02:44 PM.

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#27 Alder Logs

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 02:55 PM

All the stream banks around here have been taken over by canary grass.  The stuff is a pain.  It grows to seven feet tall and shades out all the other grasses.  One can't walk up a stream in the early mornings without getting soaked with the dew on the tall grass.   The stuff makes fly fishing the creeks hard to do.   The only way to get rid of it is to cut it often which allows the other grasses to come back.  Most places it is, I can't get into with a mower.  Some brilliant people imported it to North America from the Canary Islands to stabilize stream banks against erosion.   It followed every watercourse and now it's a plague everywhere. 

 

Still, I do get a whiff of sweet grass at times, and now at least I have a better idea of what to look for.   The flowers in the picture are certainly familiar. 

 

I loved that video, Ethno.  Thanks for your help.


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#28 ethnobotanist420

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 03:11 PM

No problem, Alder, glad I could be of some help :)

Like I said I am terrible at identifying grass species... I can't really tell any of them apart. I remember looking for phalaris grass... Not happening lol at least with sweetgrass there is a pretty big olfactory clue :)
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#29 Alder Logs

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 03:19 PM

[Direct Link]


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#30 Oriononthehorizon

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:11 PM

I like to smudge with white sage in order to clear negativity, and to promote a general state of peace. Then I use tobacco to purify. I blow uninhaled smoke into a bag with mushrooms in it, for instance. In my experience, mushrooms really love this, it could be all my belief, but for me I have certainly noticed the difference, and it has become part of my "ritual". The simple act of taking the time and energy to do this is beneficial in my humble opinion. The mushroom appreciates it, as it sees you are doing this for a very good reason, as in the context of spiritual, philosophical, and creative purposes. Just my two cents of course.
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#31 Arathu

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 07:00 PM

small_GEDC4279.jpg

 

When I put intention into something, and this is just from listening to the guidance from inside, I wind up finding the need to grow. Here is my white sage in a hot box.....

 

I definitely smudge, and I wail on my drum, and I shake a rattle, and play strange flutes and other instruments, I cast circles and call watchers.

 

I also make offerings and leave out meals, talk with the ancestors, and generally behave like I've known how to do these things for a thousand years.....

 

 


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#32 fungi2bwith

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 12:45 AM

I buy smudge sticks of native sage from the local Hopi population.....I have burnt a few smudge sticks in my time, and theirs are the best.....


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