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Endocannabinoids may be behind reward for exercise.


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#1 niemandgeist

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 06:32 PM

Link source: http://www.scientifi...-runner-s-high/

 

 

New Brain Effects Behind "Runner's High"

 

After a nice long bout of aerobic exercise, some people experience what’s known as a “runner’s high”: a feeling of euphoria coupled with reduced anxiety and a lessened ability to feel pain. For decades, scientists have associated this phenomenon with an increased level in the blood of β-endorphins, opioid peptides thought to elevate mood.

 

Now, German researchers have shown the brain’s endocannabinoid system—the same one affected by marijuana’s Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)—may also play a role in producing runner’s high, at least in mice (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2015, DOI: 10.1072/pnas.1514996112).

 

The researchers hit upon the endocannabinoid system as possibly being involved because they observed that endorphins can’t pass through the blood-brain barrier, says team member Johannes Fuss, who’s now at University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. On the other hand, a lipid-soluble endocannabinoid called anandamide—also found at high levels in people’s blood after running—can travel from the blood into the brain, where it can trigger a high. “Yet no one had investigated the effects of endocannabinoids on behavior after running,” Fuss says.

 

To explore how endocannabinoids are involved, the team familiarized a group of mice with running on an exercise wheel regularly. Then the researchers split the group into two sets of mice: one that would run for five hours and one that would remain sedentary. Soon after their five-hour run, the rodents in the first group displayed far less anxious behavior than the sedentary set when exposed to a so-called dark-light box test. In this test, a mouse’s anxiety is measured by the frequency with which the animal darts from well-lit areas into the dark to hide.

 

Similarly, mice in the running group had a higher tolerance for pain than those in the sedentary group, as measured by their tendency to jump or lick their paws when placed on a hot plate.

 

Finally, the researchers performed these same experiments on mice that were given endocannabinoid and endorphin antagonists—molecules that block cannabinoid and opioid receptors in the brain, respectively. The endorphin antagonists did not significantly affect results, but mice treated with endocannabinoid antagonists and mice genetically engineered to lack endocannabinoid receptors were still anxious and sensitive to pain despite having run for hours.

 

The team’s findings suggest that endocannabinoids such as anandamide help cause runner’s high. “The authors have moved the field forward by providing such a complete view of how this key reward system is involved in allowing exercise to improve psychological state and pain sensitivity,” says David A. Raichlen, an expert in human brain evolution and exercise at the University of Arizona.

 

The researchers write that other key aspects of runner’s high, such as euphoria, are too subjective to study in a mouse model.

 

I always get a warm, fuzzy, soothing and very relaxing feeling all throughout my body after a good power walk, a jog, and even after working out. I always thought that it was similar to a mild cannabis buzz. Now it turns out that our body's endocannabinoid system may play a part in rewarding us for exercise.

 

It was previously widely thought that endorphins played a major role in the body's reward system.


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#2 hyphaenation

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 07:18 PM

I started compiling info on endocannabinoid system here:

https://mycotopia.ne...is-revelations/
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#3 Heirloom

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 09:33 AM

I like this topic and the info. I smoked a lot of cannabis many years ago and to help me reduce my use I started lifting weights and it really helped me to de-stress and save my pot for later . I added cardio to my workouts and it really helped my mind and body. Plus increasing my muscle size has lots of benefits.
 


Edited by Heirloom Spores, 27 June 2016 - 09:33 AM.

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#4 niemandgeist

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 04:38 PM

I started compiling info on endocannabinoid system here:

https://mycotopia.ne...is-revelations/

 

That's a nice compendium of information. The fact that our endocannabinoid system plays such an important role in human health will hopefully show medical science that cannabis can also be more important for our health. Of course that's beginning to happen, but I wonder what else we can uncover about how to stay healthy and treat difficult health ailments with the help of cannabis and how it can help us to better understand our endocannabinoid system.

 

 

 

I like this topic and the info. I smoked a lot of cannabis many years ago and to help me reduce my use I started lifting weights and it really helped me to de-stress and save my pot for later . I added cardio to my workouts and it really helped my mind and body. Plus increasing my muscle size has lots of benefits.
 

 

Working out, both strength training and cardio, are really important for our mental and physical health and well-being. I'm glad to see anyone else who is into healthy active habits.

 

Putting on some muscle, whether you're going for size and strength or just aiming to be strong and be happy with any extra muscle, I think for men there's something innate within us that makes us feel better about ourselves knowing we're not weak and looking fit and healthy. It definitely helps with self-image and self-esteem, too.


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#5 Heirloom

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 05:41 PM

From several ancient  Religious texts - a wise man increases his strength. 
This prevents others from trying to bully a person and instead want to accept him and work with him instead of kill him and take his mate and enslave his children and others who are part of his tribe.

Niem you know this from being able to do 1 arm push ups with your feet up against a wall.

The weak are in danger the strong are not. This should be tied to being in nature for our mental and physical health.

 I got to admit than when people asked if I lifted weights it made me feel good but I noticed that some of my male friends were not happy with my increasing my strength or size. Indicating  they were not really friends, because a friend is happy when you are doing good. They were to lazy to work out.

 I was asked to hand a "friend a 40 lb tank" and he was slow about taking it but I held it straitght out until he decided to grab it , the look in his eye was worth it. I was just a kind hippy type never threating anyone, being gentle and kind to even those who insulted me. He had called me a candy ass and a pussy but I felt no need to prove other wise as I was a paratrooper in the 82nd airborn and then in the 5th mechanized infantry. He could not make it through boot camp and was sent home  early. I never made fun of him for that

 One day he called my brother a prison bitch and my brother told him NO , you are a jail house snitch, he went away very upset but would not fight my brother 1-1. My brother apoglized to be kind to this loser . when he bragged about what a bad ass marine he was , it was revealed by his military records that he failed to make it through boot camp.

I go on bicycle rides in my neighborhood and was threatened with homosexual rape and stopped , was not afraid and have made it a habit to go by there every day

 I avoided fights when I can by being willing to fight but I don't like hurting other but now realize that to do so might help the aggressor to learn.

 I got carried away , sorry but, I guess I am pissed about so called tough guys that are only tough when they have 5 friends with them against 1.


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#6 niemandgeist

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 06:40 PM

I'm cool with having my threads go off on tangents so long as interesting things are being said. :biggrin: Hyphae's big post about the endocannabinoid system up top is likely the first thing people will see coming to this thread, so there's no harm in veering away from the main topic for a bit.

 

In my early 20's I used to go around being a dick to strangers and speaking my mind. I had a BAD temper and because I'd just lost tons of weight and got into decent shape from lifting weights I felt like "the shit." One day I yelled at the wrong kid while hanging out at the local mall and his other friend ganged up on me to yell in my face while another one rushed at me from behind and knocked me flat on my ass. They scrambled so quickly when mall security showed up. Tough guys, huh?

 

Another time I yelled at some younger punk kids in a Denny's parking lot at night because they threw a frozen water bottle at me. They started to gang up on me while a friend just stood there doing nothing. I whipped out my phone and acted like I was calling the police. That scared them off.

 

Now I've long since gotten my temper in check and I know not to do that kind of stuff. The idea of a fair fight only exists in movies and on TV. It's not worth it. They could be stupid and pull a knife or something worse.

 

Also, to briefly correct you: I can do one-arm push ups on the floor with feet about shoulder width apart, but the most I can do on a good day is 5. The slower I go the fewer I can do. It's handstand push ups that I need a wall or pole to lean up against, and depending on how far apart my hand placement is I can bang them out easily or only be able to do 5, or if I put my hands touching maybe 1 or 2... But yes: It really does make me feel great to know that I can do those things.

 

It took me 8 months of serious training to slowly work my way up to being able to do my very first handstand push up. It took 1 year and 2 months before I could do my first one-arm push up on each side, but I had to spread my legs out as far as they could go which makes the exercise easier.

 

I really had to have patience and discipline to work my way up to being able to do those things so I'm proud of those accomplishments.

 

 

The only real drawback to bodyweight stuff is that it's harder to put on muscle mass. In order to do progressive overload to build strength and muscle you need to progressively move onto and master intermediate "progressions" of basic exercises in order to get to the very difficult stuff. With weights it's easier and faster as, in order to increase resistance, you just add more weight to the bar. It's still hard work doing barbells, but to make the movements harder it's easier to do than bodyweight.

 

I still do weighted chin ups and dips at lower reps for raw strength, but since I'm moving the weight on the dip belt PLUS my bodyweight it's tougher. This is why I'm considering doing barbell deadlifts, bench, and dumbbell/barbell rows again while I have the bench and barbells at home still where I live.

 

 

I got to admit than when people asked if I lifted weights it made me feel good...

 

I've had male neighbors tell me that I look great and I've surprised my boss, as well as some customers (all men) at being able to, for my size, lift 3 stacked milk crates with 4 gallons of milk each and move it onto a U-boat (to wheel product in/out) from the ground or vice-versa. I'm 5'6" tall at most and weigh 155 right now.

 

I've also surprised my old man when I had to help him cut up carpet and roll it up into big rolls to move from the second floor all the way out into the garage. He said it was too heavy but I could manage it. I've also surprised him with moving firewood/big pieces of logs before.

 

It definitely makes you feel good to have others acknowledge your hard work and abilities. I always get a kick out of surprising people, though!

 

At the same time, maybe because I used to be super obese, I have good and bad days about body image. I know I'm not weak, but as far as how I look I don't see myself as some others apparently do. There's even a pretty fit counselor at my day treatment program I've been going to who said I've got "that cut" and that he can tell I work out.

 

It's been said before: "The day you start lifting (or working out in general) is the day you become forever small."

 

 

 

...but I noticed that some of my male friends were not happy with my increasing my strength or size. Indicating  they were not really friends, because a friend is happy when you are doing good. They were to lazy to work out.

 

True friends will support you, even if you can do things they can't and you are doing great at stuff they can't or won't learn to do for themselves. I focus on improving myself. If somebody is getting a lot fitter or bigger and stronger I'm going to support him and tell him he's doing amazing. Any able-bodied man can become stronger and/or put on a lot of size if only he'd work for it.

 

I've had friends tell me they wanted to learn how to do one-arm push ups and handstand push ups, but then when they hear how long it took me to do they lose their interest. They could have it and more if they'd just work for it. Most people are lazy. It's a shame.

 

For me, I don't want to look like a body builder, but of course I know that takes years of big eating, dedicated heavy lifting, and it doesn't happen accidentally. I've only been seriously training for 1 and 1/2 years. The last time I was doing barbells I was only slightly bigger than I am now but I was doing that seriously for 2 years. I wouldn't mind getting a bit bigger over the next 3 years, but that's a long-term goal and I mainly try to stay around the same weight so I probably won't get much bigger. So long as I get stronger I'm happy!

 

 

 I was asked to hand a "friend a 40 lb tank" and he was slow about taking it but I held it straitght out until he decided to grab it , the look in his eye was worth it.

 

There's a younger guy who works in the dairy department part time with me. One day I was working with him and my boss moving milk crates from a delivery palette onto the floor and/or moving them to stack against the wall. I can pick up and walk a distance just fine if I do 2 crates at a time stacked on top of one another.

 

I went to take two and my boss was like, "You got that?"

 

"Two isn't that heavy", I replied, and I started moving them 2-by-2 to the wall.

 

The younger part-timer lifts weights so he saw me move it easily, then he went to go take two and it was funny to see how he struggled with it. :biggrin: :tongue:

 

I tend to get those reactions because I'm not very tall or overly muscular. People don't assume a little guy like me is going to be capable of moving heavy shit.


Edited by niemandgeist, 27 June 2016 - 06:51 PM.





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