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Balep Tibetan Flat Bread - a skillet Bread


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#1 Heirloom

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 01:40 PM

Balep is an easy to make flat bread eaten in central Tibet. The term for a single piece of this bread is Pao Belap.

Recipe:

2 cups of all purpose flour - or any flour you like.
1 tablespoon of baking powder
1 cup of water.

 pour the flour and baking powder in to a bowl mix then start adding water a little at a time
mix with your hands until you can make a smooth ball of dough.

now knead the ball of dough until it is flexible.

divide into 4 equal parts , roll into balls put in bowl and cover with a lid or a damp towel.

let sit 15 - 20 minutes

then place a ball of dough on a flat surface then using a rolling pin roll make round pieces of dough half an inch thick . Do this to they other 3 balls of dough.

A heated skillet with a lid is then used to cook the flat bread add oil or butter if needed to prevent sticking.

Cook on medium for 15 minutes  turning ever 4-5 minutes so both sides get cooked well.

A person can add butter or apple sauce to the flour to add other flavors , infact many things are added to
prevent what we call "taste deprivation" caused by eating the same thing over and over for long periods of time.

A picture I borrowed

The simplest bread can be made with only flour and water then cooked , even on a hot rock.

   namaste

 

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  • belap_korkun3.jpg

Edited by Heirloom Spores, 19 August 2016 - 01:56 PM.

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#2 Heirloom

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 02:15 PM

Next I will show how to make " MOMOs " a Tibetan dumpling filled with meat or shiitake mushrooms, then steamed .

They can be vegetarian or filled with meat . Due the shortage of Yak meat here I will use beef - ground beef.
I will use my own homegrown shiitake for the vegetarian Momos.

A picture borrowed from the Tibetan culture group I joined.

We will drink butter tea , burn incense and chant a mantra ,smoke some sacred cannabis.
Have a communal meal.

We will be flying on Hofmann Airlines where you can take a trip and never leave home.

                               namaste

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  • momo.jpg

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#3 Juthro

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 12:52 PM

Looks good, HS, your making me hungry :)

There is nothing quite like a meat, and vegie filled piece of bread. It is about the best comfort food out there (IMO). One of my personal favorites is the Russian piroshky (with smoked salmon), but I would love to try those momo's, as they sound divine.

Your Tibetan culture group sounds cool, BTW.
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#4 Heirloom

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 01:53 PM

I enjoy trying foods from other cultures, I will have to look in to Russian dishes , I really like smoked salmon.

I saw a woman making tortilla s one day with only flour and water and just had to try them myself ,they were good .

Learning about other cultures makes me feel good and closer to people around the world.

I have a bunch of Tibetan prayer flags I want to put up , I find them beautiful.

 have a great day


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#5 Juthro

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 03:00 PM

As a kid, I was a very picky eater. I try and be more adventuresome in my older age, and have found that I was missing out on some good stuff. Though I am still a little cautious about some of the native Alaskan dishes that I've come across. For instance, I am not overly fond of what they call eskimo ice cream, or akutaq. It is made of whipped reindeer fat, seal oil, fresh berries, and ground fish...

If your ever in Seattle, Pikes Place market has a vender that sells those salmon/dill piroshky's, they are KILLER!

The only other place I've ever seen sell them, is our local Russian Orthodox Church. They make them for fundraisers and such.
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#6 Heirloom

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 04:37 PM

Juthro I can relate to that as a kid I would not eat octopus and other Asian foods, the Thai woman who made this meal was offended but being 11 or 12 I just wasn't hungry enough. My parents were ashamed  that we would not eat. They "lost face" .

I can understand though if a group of people came to my home and I had no idea of the food restrictions I could offend them by serving crab, lobster, pork or even T bones. I however would not be offended but understand and then provide food more suitable to them.

In Indian culture to kill a cow and butcher it could bring death to the host.

I have often worried about being offered the eye of a goat. My sister raised and sold lots of goats for meat. She likes goats milk , fresh cows milk.

If I had the money I would buy her a herd of Yaks , Bison and Cattle, set her up with a dairy and workers , paid top dollar . Just a pipe dream.


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#7 Heirloom

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 01:28 PM

I made some flat bread yesterday , I cooked it a little high but did not ruin it. I was in to much of a hurry. I will do better next time.

I cooked some ground beef in a bowl with water and diced red onions (home grown ), which I used to stuff the flat bread with and the liquid with some onions was use to dip in.

We both enjoyed it, for a simple mean I had butter tea to drink with it.

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#8 Myc

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 08:15 AM

I jumped the gun a little and tried making the MOMO's 

Funny, I missed the part about steaming them and baked them in the oven.

 

While they weren't bad - I could do better. 

Can you "tek" me on how to steam the dumplings?

 

I made some really good filling:

 

Marinate a pack of sweet sausage in the following mix:

1 Tbsp. seasoned rice vinegar (mango)

1 tsp. freshly grated ginger

3 garlic cloves - pressed

2 Tbsp. honey

Chopped red onion

Chopped peppers - red, yellow, orange

 

The chopped peppers also make a nice "slaw". 

Simply clean them and process them to the shredded texture of cole slaw (no sauce or dressing)

Add your favorite grapes to the mix. The grapes add a sweet "kicker" which sets off the sweetness of the peppers. 

 

If you haven't guessed by now.......I have a sweet tooth. 


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#9 Heirloom

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 11:56 AM

A steamer is simply a pot of boiling water , the food to be steamed sits above the boiling water and it cooked by the steam.

There are many steamers available for cooking steamed rice to vegs to anything.

 I use a large pot with a round wire insert I made for mushroom work  it sits several inches tall
above the boiling water on that I have a pie pan with lots of holes I drilled into to it.

  use an oil on the steamer pan to prevent sticking.   Also have your water boiling before you add your momos

I will get some pics up of mine, just a simple home made steamer.

Steamers can be multi level, cooking other foods at the same time.

When making momos use only flour and water - no baking powder.

Steamers can be purchased for $25


 Your filling sounds awesome .


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#10 Juthro

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 12:07 PM

You can also get a universal steamer, and use your own pot, for under $15 (on amazon)
steamer.jpg

It's the kind I used to use before I got my rice cooker (which doubles as a steamer), and they work well IMHO.

But like HS said, you can improvise one with a little creative thought, as all it does is hold your food above the boiling water in a pot on some kind of mesh, so the steam can circulate the food. A great way to cook delish veggies BTW, and good for you too.
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