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What is usually used to start cultures?


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#1 T0them00N

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 08:28 PM

So I'm debating on purchasing some wood spawn plugs .. my question here is; are they any more difficult to start grain spawn from? I mean can I sterilize the grain in a jar and throw a couple plugs in each jar? They're a little cheaper than syringes. Thanks
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#2 outoforder

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 09:33 PM

asumed that the plugs were sterilized, then colonized... and that you are working under sterilized conditions it will work...


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#3 wharfrat

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 11:50 PM

most edibles could be started on cardboard and wood chips, including dowels..just a matter if you want an easy start up or learn from scratch, i suggest you buy a culture or spores of the edibles you want and start from there, only way to learn.



#4 T0them00N

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 12:10 AM

Thanks for the replys. I have started from a spore syringes before and have been successfull thus far. It's just plugs are forein territory for me.

#5 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 09:19 AM

most edibles could be started on cardboard and wood chips, including dowels..just a matter if you want an easy start up or learn from scratch, i suggest you buy a culture or spores of the edibles you want and start from there, only way to learn.

 

not all edibles spores will germinate on agar. some need specific

conditions to allow for germination. even if you get spores to germinate

and they run out clean, and you have clean spawn, there is no guarantee

that you will get fruits.

 

don't start a project from dowels, they might only be pasteurized. if you

want to do this and NOT waste time and money, follow the most common

paths. they are more common because they work. wait until you toss an

entire batch of spawn or substrate trying to save a step or a bit of time, 

you will be kicking yourself in the ass wishing you had taken the long road.



#6 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 09:26 AM

to answer your thread title question, most folks get an agar wedge

in a micro-centrifuge tube for a new culture. depending on what your

goals are, you could get sawdust or grain spawn instead. since we 

still don't have a sponsor worth a damn, i'm going to refer you to the 

company that i use to purchase spawn. 

 

https://simonsaysmushrooms.com/


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#7 Myc

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 10:41 AM

Thanks for the replys. I have started from a spore syringes before and have been successfull thus far. It's just plugs are forein territory for me.

 

It's easy to go from colonized grains to plugs. The plugs only need be pasteurized if you used enough spawn. High spawn ratio = more rapid colonization.

 

Since the plugs could have only been pasteurized instead of sterilized, it is more difficult to go back to sterilized substrates such as grains. Depending upon your spawn ratio, "foreign" organisms can out-run the desired cultivar in some cases.

 

All of that aside, you are correct in thinking you could spawn grains with colonized dowels. 

It couldn't hurt to give it a shot if you don't mind the potential for failure. 

I've done it before.

Also, I've always thought it would be a great way to store woodlover culture long-term (on dowels). A thread around here documents how one member places a wood sliver or tooth-pick in their agar slants for archival storage of woodlover isolates. 


Edited by Myc, 21 August 2016 - 10:42 AM.

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#8 T0them00N

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 06:03 PM

Well looks like I will get one of the more common methods. Thanks for breaking this down for me guys. It makes sense to get something that has been sterilized to start working with instead of pasturized. Kmc thanks for the link too I'll look into them some more right now
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#9 AmatuerShaman

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 12:55 PM

I've been considering doing the exact same thing to try to get a lot of varieties going at the same time. I planned to get about 7 varieties of dowels from Paul Stamets website, then take the dowels to cardboard or eggcarton cardboard to get some hopefully clean myc, then either do a transfer or LC to more dowels and bulk substrate. I figured if the transfer to cardboard didn't go well at least I'd have enough dowels to do a few logs. I have a ton of white oak on my property that I need to get into and trim/prune away from the house so it seemed a good time to start some logs. Alternatively I've considered asking around to try to obtain nice cultures from some of the skilled members here, but knowing the effort required I don't know that it would be within my budget I've set aside for the project and I don't want to shortchange anybody on price. Definitely open to critiques of my strategy.



#10 catattack

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 01:41 PM

I've been considering doing the exact same thing to try to get a lot of varieties going at the same time. I planned to get about 7 varieties of dowels from Paul Stamets website, then take the dowels to cardboard or eggcarton cardboard to get some hopefully clean myc, then either do a transfer or LC to more dowels and bulk substrate. I figured if the transfer to cardboard didn't go well at least I'd have enough dowels to do a few logs. I have a ton of white oak on my property that I need to get into and trim/prune away from the house so it seemed a good time to start some logs. Alternatively I've considered asking around to try to obtain nice cultures from some of the skilled members here, but knowing the effort required I don't know that it would be within my budget I've set aside for the project and I don't want to shortchange anybody on price. Definitely open to critiques of my strategy.

 

I'd cut that down from seven varieties to say two or three and focus on technique, clean work, and mastery of basic skills before going all in on logs or whatever you end up doing.






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