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U.S. to buy 11 million pounds of cheese to boost dairy prices


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#1 Zen_

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 08:51 PM

U.S. to buy 11 million pounds of cheese to boost dairy prices

Read more: http://www.chicagotr...0824-story.html

 

 

FpMaZAP.png

 

 
The Department of Agriculture plans to buy $20 million of stockpiled cheese to distribute to food banks and pantries nationwide in an attempt to stem farmer losses after dairy prices plummeted amid a global milk glut earlier this year.
 
The purchase of about 11 million pounds of cheese, which the USDA reported Tuesday in a statement, comes in addition to $11.2 million in subsidies for dairy producers announced earlier this month. A dairy lobbying group had asked for as much $150 million in cheese purchases.
 
"We understand that the nation's dairy producers are experiencing challenges due to market conditions and that food banks continue to see strong demand for assistance," Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in the statement.
 
A combination of plentiful supply and flagging global demand has put farmers on the back foot in recent years. Some American dairy cooperatives had so much milk this spring they were forced to dump tens of millions of pounds.
 
Yet more recently, producers in some parts of the country have seen premiums on the open market as food manufacturers struggle to purchase enough milk. Declining corn and soybean prices also mean lower feed costs for farmers.
 
Overall, 2016 dairy margins will shake out close to the five-year average and increase in 2017, encouraging modest expansion within the industry, said Bill Brooks, a Dearborn, Missouri-based dairy economist at INTL FCStone. Futures prices for Class III milk -- a category of the commodity used to make cheese -- has rebounded 45 percent since hitting at a six-year low in May in Chicago. That's reduced the need for federal aid, said Marin Bozic, a dairy economist at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul.
 
"The USDA wants to demonstrate that it's there for dairy," said Bozic, who said the market recovery is probably why the USDA's planned purchase amounts to less than the $150 million asked for. "In an election season, they want to do something, even if the market seems to be rallying."
 
The latest aid has come too late for Kipp Hinz, 27, a dairyman in Ellsworth, Wisconsin, who watched a trailer haul away his herd of 60 cows last month after shuttering his farm. Hinz said he couldn't afford to buy feed for the animals.
 
"It's heartbreaking," Hinz said in an interview. "When prices tanked, that was the time I really needed something to happen to work out a plan with the bank, renew my contracts and get more feed."
 
The pain is also being felt on other continents. In the past year, the European Union has issued two aid packages totaling $1.1 billion (1 billion euros), including incentives to cut output. In New Zealand, farmers are culling herds due to depressed prices and annual production there is forecast by the USDA to drop 2 percent in 2016. That's prompted the New Zealand central bank to stress-test the main lenders in the country, where the dairy industry accounts for 10 percent of bank lending.
 
One reason for the dairy's recent difficulties was a slowdown in Chinese demand, but the country may now be back in the market, with milk imports up 87 percent this year through May, according to the USDA. The price of whole milk powder sold by GlobalDairyTrade, an international dairy sales platform owned by New Zealand's Fonterra Cooperative Group, jumped 19 percent to $2,695 a metric ton in the most recent auction held last week.
 
"The bear market is over," said Matt Gould, a Philadelphia-based analyst for the Dairy & Food Market Analyst newsletter, said by phone. "The industry does not appear to be in a crisis."


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#2 Zen_

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 08:54 PM

So as a taxpayer, I'm now going to be paying for cheese I won't be able to eat, as well as giving cash to the dairy farmers, all so I'll get to pay more for the cheese I do buy to eat? What the ever living fuck are we doing?


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#3 Alder Logs

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 09:33 PM

I was once a poor hippie living on welfare cheese.  

 

Now I have quit killer dairy products altogether.  

 

Hey folks, whatever you have to pay, enjoy your chronic health problems. 


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#4 Juthro

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 09:56 PM

I remember that welfare crap they called cheese.....   My definition of what cheese is seems to be different then the governments.

 

 


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#5 Alder Logs

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 04:19 PM

What we got here was great medium cheddar.   It was not even dyed, and it was excellent.  There was even a time when we got some Tillamook.   Both kinds were in five pound blocks.  I preferred the stuff that wasn't dyed, but both tasted great.  It was not that American cheese shit.



#6 Juthro

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 06:52 PM

I remember it being OK to cook with, but not the best if you were hankering for a hunk of cheese.

But that was a long time ago, and memories are subjective, (at least mine is).

#7 August West

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 10:38 PM

What the ever living fuck are we doing?

Right now, some uninformed dupe in the USA is protesting something they've been told is, "free market capitalism"...or usually, just, "capitalism". 

 

 

Now I have quit killer dairy products altogether.  

 

 

I'm curious as to how dairy products are, "killers"? Can you elaborate?


Edited by August West, 29 August 2016 - 11:50 PM.


#8 Sidestreet

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 05:16 AM

At the very least, they are distributing it and not just dumping it.


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#9 Alder Logs

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 09:48 AM

 

I'm curious as to how dairy products are, "killers"? Can you elaborate?

 

Oh, sorry.  Everybody needs milk! 

 

Me?  I was lucky enough to be just dairy intolerant enough to actually quit cheese, clearing up numerous chronic health issues.   If anyone should need milk, they should probably get it from humans.

 

==================

 

On edit:  Cheese tasted great to me.  I remember that I never liked having to drink milk when I was a kid (unless it was full of sugar or chocolate).   I have a hard time eating any food now that I don't prepare myself, because if it has milk or glutenous grain products in it, I gas up immediately.   And everyone, it seems, has to cook with milk, and probably flour.    I had already quit red meat and sugar many decades ago.   I had probably been on a type two diabetes track when I was young, in any event.  

 

It was the outbreak of eczema that created the state of emergency that made me begin to systematically remove one dietary factor from my menu at a time, and these changes I did for months in order to be more sure about the results.   I loved cheese so much that I even quit ale before that.   The thought of no more chili rellenos or pizza for life was just too grim, so cheese was last to be tried.

 

Not only did the now large patch of eczema disappear, but a real curse, that of my terrible hay fever, became a walk in the park compared to what it had been, with it being non-existent some seasons, while others were having bad years locally. 

 

Don't leave it to me to say why dairy foods are poison to most humans.   See what professionals who actually know something about human nutrition say.  These professionals rarely have an MD after their names.   One also might check into how the dairy industry's power mimics the way the tobacco boys did their work with government officials.   I would have figured that you, August, would have already known all that.


Edited by Alder Logs, 30 August 2016 - 10:57 AM.

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#10 Alder Logs

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 11:02 AM

BTW, everyone should see, Cowspiracy!



#11 niemandgeist

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 11:46 AM

All I know is that I'm the guy who puts the cheese out on the shelf for people to buy and I don't want to get involved!



#12 Heirloom

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 12:01 PM

out of likes but at least they are giving it away instead of dumping in the ocean.

I like dairy but need to reduce my intake of saturated fat.

Cows have been bred to produce more  like wheat has been bred to have more gluten than ever before. Then there is genetic modification and  hormones. All causing problems for people with certain genotypes.

I admit I have a dairy problem , don't leave me around cream, half n half , milk .cheese  or yogurt.
I'll be on it like a crackhead on the pipe.

I have an understanding of why cows are sacred to some as milk can provide the nutrition needed to sustain life.
I once told my brother that I consider milk sacred he replied that he considered it sacred also. I have a sister that
loves her milk. She drinks a large amount as food straight from the cow, but she also like goats milk

My paternal grandfather loved his dairy so much it clogged his arteries leading to his brain , reducing blood flow, causing dementia.
He drank 1 gallon of whole milk a day and also took in cream, half n half, cheese. Lived into his mid 70'S but I don't want clogged arteries or dementia.

 I have wondered if we inherited a desire for milk. My father limited us on milk and had no milk problem.

Everybody handles foods differently, some can use dairy others can't, some die if the eat a peanut.

 I want to try milk from a female Yak (a nak or dri ) I also want to eat some Yak meat. Yes I am a cow eater.


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#13 Heirloom

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 04:12 PM

 
The persons face must be hidden to protect his identity . Here he is with a baby goat.

He just wants them to live.  He holds no ill will towards those who drink its milk , or eats it.
Just treat them with respect.

Watch the news, this guy might bee seen on the news wearing a hide sneaking up on a
female to suckle on a bison or a deer, he here's horse milk is good as camel milk is.

 

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#14 Alder Logs

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 09:51 PM

Goats are really good people.   I used to have as many as 8 adults.   Not too fond of billy goats, though.   They are the dirty old men of the animal world.


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#15 Juthro

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 10:25 PM

Not too fond of billy goats, though.   They are the dirty old men of the animal world.


So true, lol.

I have less then fond memories of taking care of our neighbors critters while they were gone, and dealing with Victor, their billy goat, was a learning experience for a young lad like myself.

Well that's not true, I didn't mind the rest of the animals, but Victor scared me (I would have been around 8 or 9 years old at the time).

Edited by Juthro, 30 August 2016 - 10:26 PM.

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#16 August West

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 01:36 AM

I like dairy but need to reduce my intake of saturated fat.
 

 

New studies (those damned studies) suggest that saturated fats are a problem only when combined with large amounts of refined carbohydrates....

 

My paternal grandfather loved his dairy so much it clogged his arteries leading to his brain , reducing blood flow, causing dementia.
 

 

I'm always curious to hear how things like dairy (or whatever) are pinpointed to cause the ailments you describe. Do you have any insight into this claim?

 

 

 

 

I'm curious as to how dairy products are, "killers"? Can you elaborate?

 

Oh, sorry.  Everybody needs milk! 

 

Me?  I was lucky enough to be just dairy intolerant enough to actually quit cheese, clearing up numerous chronic health issues.   If anyone should need milk, they should probably get it from humans.

 

==================

 

On edit:  Cheese tasted great to me.  I remember that I never liked having to drink milk when I was a kid (unless it was full of sugar or chocolate).   I have a hard time eating any food now that I don't prepare myself, because if it has milk or glutenous grain products in it, I gas up immediately.   And everyone, it seems, has to cook with milk, and probably flour.    I had already quit red meat and sugar many decades ago.   I had probably been on a type two diabetes track when I was young, in any event.  

 

It was the outbreak of eczema that created the state of emergency that made me begin to systematically remove one dietary factor from my menu at a time, and these changes I did for months in order to be more sure about the results.   I loved cheese so much that I even quit ale before that.   The thought of no more chili rellenos or pizza for life was just too grim, so cheese was last to be tried.

 

Not only did the now large patch of eczema disappear, but a real curse, that of my terrible hay fever, became a walk in the park compared to what it had been, with it being non-existent some seasons, while others were having bad years locally. 

 

Don't leave it to me to say why dairy foods are poison to most humans.   See what professionals who actually know something about human nutrition say.  These professionals rarely have an MD after their names.   One also might check into how the dairy industry's power mimics the way the tobacco boys did their work with government officials.   I would have figured that you, August, would have already known all that.

 

Caveat: I'm home late after a long day but didn't want this response to slip too far. It'll probably ramble a bit and have grammatical garbles. It is not edited (the edit was to include the comments to H. Spores...

 

I am aware of many of your claims. I don't really care about the "dairy industry". There are far more individuals who produce dairy that aren't part of "the industry (dun dun dunnnnnnn)" than are part of it. People like to glom onto the studies that prove their team is the best and ignore the ones that disagree (you of all people should know this ;). I can point to as many studies that refute your claims as you can that support them [here I'll also point to the rapidly crumbling sham that saturated fats are bad for you - this is practically been criminal level bullshit].  Scientism must be taken on a case-by-case basis. Further, your personal anecdotes are just that (though I'm happy to hear you no longer suffer the ailments you described). I'm sure the Masai would object to your hyperbole about dairy being poison.

 

All those studies hardly account for how the animals are being fed let alone the sedentary lifestyles of the consumers or the sugars and refined grains (not much different) they eat. Is the dairy pasteurized or (probably) worse, homogenized? Do they take into account the ridiculous idea of 'skim' and 'low-fat', let alone the endless other variety of possibilities. Of course they don't, they can't.

 

I don't eat/drink a ton of dairy. I do consume my fair share of cheese and copious amounts of grass-fed butter - copious amounts and have the occasional post jiu jitsu chocolate milk (a well-studied recover drink btw)...my blood levels are "off the charts" healthy.

 

The Weston Price Foundation has a lot of quality information on the benefits of dairy in the diet. I also recommend the extremely boring and informational presentation, The Oiling of America. It goes a long way towards offering an alternative to the garbage science behind the demonizing of red  meat, saturated fats and, more indirectly, dairy products...buyer beware on those sacred vegetable oils.

 

Ultimately, food science is, imperfect. Someone who sits on the couch all day and someone who does consistent vigorous exercise (and everything in between) do not need to consume the same diet. What is clear though, is that to call "dairy products" poison is ridiculous. 


Edited by August West, 31 August 2016 - 02:16 AM.

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#17 Alder Logs

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 09:51 AM

Bon apetit.


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#18 Heirloom

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 04:49 PM

Thanks August, my grandfather who I mentioned with the health problems with high fat also ate a dozen or so donuts a day,
Milk and sweets were his vice.

I need to look into all this more.

Alder I got eczema on one hand at about 30 yrs.old, I notice there are times when it flares up and then I can go long periods of time with no problem. I have considered writing this down and now need to include foods and stress to see if I can prevent it in the future.
Thanks more mentioning that.

I got plenty of reading to do.

EDIT: I have heard of high fat diets and high protein diets with no carbs that kept people lean and heart healthy.

 I wonder what role genetics might play in these diets.

I knew a woman who went on suck a diet and lost weight but she was also very active for her age 60's.

I have heard of people having kidney problems from these diets but maybe the fats they consumed were not the fats consumed by other cultures who eat this diet.

 Milk does contain carbs though and has plenty of sugars in it naturally.
 


Edited by Heirloom Spores, 31 August 2016 - 05:22 PM.


#19 Juthro

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 12:51 AM

This thread inspired me to smoke 4 lbs of Colby, and 2 lbs of Swiss this morning. I like to do it while it is still cold outside (we are getting down to the high 30's in the morning here), all the better to keep the cheese from melting while smoking.

I'll smoke the regular cheddar tomorrow (I've got another 8 lbs in the fridge earmarked), that way I don't mix it up with the Colby.... again, lol.

Then it'll be aged just about perfect, to give away as presents for X-mas :)
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#20 coorsmikey

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 01:04 AM

This thread inspired me to smoke 4 lbs of Colby, and 2 lbs of Swiss this morning. I like to do it while it is still cold outside (we are getting down to the high 30's in the morning here), all the better to keep the cheese from melting while smoking.I'll smoke the regular cheddar tomorrow (I've got another 8 lbs in the fridge earmarked), that way I don't mix it up with the Colby.... again, lol.Then it'll be aged just about perfect, to give away as presents for X-mas :)

where the heck do you find a pipe that big in AK? I have hard enough time trying find one to smoke gram! You must have gotten your pipe from Tillmook online to fit 4 pounds in it. :)
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