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Wood-lovers for beginners?


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#1 salviamycelium

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 05:57 AM

Hello everyone,

 

I already briefly introduced myself in the first pinned thread and I do wonder how I'll amass three posts because I'd rather not introduce myself two more times  :blush: I'm not that cool, and those are the only threads available to me. 

 

But, a question then. I've never grown any mushrooms. It's a long story why but it boils down to that I live in a place where libs are abundant. Only problem with libs is that they grow in plain sight...

What are the chances that I could just go ahead and grow wood lovers successfully, with no previous experience with cubes etc.? My climate and local conditions (soil, type of vegetation, ...) appear to be ideal for them. 

 

I've seen the huuuge thread on wood lovers (98 pages) and by now I've read most of it. I consider myself experienced with Plants. I  :wub:  Plants. But no experience with Shrooms, other than eating them :biggrin:  :wub:  :wub:  

 

I don't plan to grow cubes (which could be a stepping stone) for two main reasons. The first one is that I don't want to have anything growing indoors except maybe some mycelium for a couple of months until I can dig a hole outside and make a bed. The other one is the potency compared to the readily available libs, and how they dry and store compared to them (not nearly as well). So I'll really just start out with the wood-lovers unless too many experienced people say this is really dumb. I will listen to input, at least considering every argument, pro and con, although I am a hardheaded person :blush: .

 

Thanks!


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#2 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 10:09 AM

I think you can do it.  You just need the woodlover spores or better a spore syringe, some glass jars I suggest the smallest ones.
You will need a pressure cooker to sterilize the grain jars in.

A guy might be able to use the PF Tek and steam his jars and get the mycelium growing that way and then transfer to cardboard or woodchips.

The reason I say the smallest jars is they grow slow and a whole culture can be started by a single colonized grain put onto egg carton cardboard grown and put in a tub with alder wood chips.  Grow them out and put outside in the spring and come fall harvest.

The first few pages of the communal woodlover thread has plenty of info.

I got a few woodlover beds myself and started this way in 2014 and even tripped on PS.Cyans - wavy caps yesterday.

Please do come join us in the Communal Wood  Lover thread. One more post and you will be off the probation period.

peace dude

 


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#3 salviamycelium

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 10:17 AM

That's the huuuge thread I read yesterday and today. Blew my mind!

 

My season is short (for Plants): snow is gone usually in the beginning of May. Maybe, if I'm very lucky, the last week of April I can dig a hole but it might be still frozen then. And hard frosts come often as early as mid October. Summers are mild and very humid. September is usually very rainy. Zone 5a.

 

Do you think I can get a bed of azurescens fruit in 2017?  :wub:

 

...

The first few pages of the communal woodlover thread has plenty of info.

...

Please do come join us in the Communal Wood  Lover thread. One more post and you will be off the probation period.

peace dude

 



#4 DocOct

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 11:00 AM

you should consider doing a pftek grow, not for the harvest but for the learning experience and all in all its a really neat process, fostering an organism is a really rewarding experience you will learn a lot about mycology that way.

 

if you choose not to i have full faith that you will have no problem jumping into an outdoor woodlover grow :D


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#5 Myc

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 11:44 AM

If they grow in your area, your job is super simple.

 

Go to a producing bed and do a little digging. Observe the materials that the mycelium occupies and collect some. Is it landscape bark? Decomposed leaf litter? Chunks of wood? (identify the wood specie if possible)

Replicate the conditions you see in nature - water sources, shade, location (north side of a tree?), etc. 

Build a bed at your chosen location with the materials you've observed (or collected in bulk in the wild).

Go get a shovel-full of mycelium from a known producing bed and transfer that to your un-initiated pile of materials. Try to keep it all in one solid chunk - ala the "island effect" (an observation of Workman's). 

Sit back and watch the show. 

 

It's a little bit of scratching and digging .... but easier than setting up to learn sterile culture. You can learn aseptic technique while the bed colonizes in the warmer months. When they fruit, you can learn to take prints. Just in time for exercising your newly acquired skills. 


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#6 salviamycelium

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 11:47 AM

No, they don't grow here, I live in the Old Continent. But I want to make them grow here :)


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#7 Myc

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 12:00 PM

Hmmm. Sorry, I misunderstood. In which case, Heirloom Spores provided the best advice for success.

Here's an effort you might check out and see if it answers any questions:

https://mycotopia.ne...r-08-too/page-6


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#8 salviamycelium

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 02:49 AM

I like your signature  :biggrin:

 

Hmmm. Sorry, I misunderstood. In which case, Heirloom Spores provided the best advice for success.

Here's an effort you might check out and see if it answers any questions:

https://mycotopia.ne...r-08-too/page-6



#9 mjroom

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 03:25 AM

Welcome aboard Salviamycelium, you have come to the right place and all the right things are happening. There is so much excellent advice and help for you here at mycotopia. I have very limited experience and have not yet brought any mycelium to fruit yet myself but I am happy to help as I can and moral support is a great thing to have so you have that now. Azurescens Cyanescens Allenii Subs and Ovoids will all be good types to try and see what takes off for you where you are. So good to have you here look forward to hearing of your success your timing is perfect for starting a patch of mycelium this spring. mjroom.


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#10 salviamycelium

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 05:13 AM

Thanks. I don't know why they don't grow here to begin with because we have so many Galerinas wherever I go. Galerinas and these Psilocybes often share habitat I'm reading, to the extent that they grow right next to each other.

 

I'll have to be careful with that because I've never really paid attention to them in detail. I looked up some identifiers (both descriptions, like where they grow - on the substrate or directly on wood etc and pictures) but still, I'll have to be careful because I will place them in outdoor locations where Galerinas are known to be abundant.

 

I believe it's not too far-fetched to think that they could spread here  :wub:  :wub:  :wub:

 

The other thing we have a lot of is fly agaric, I just step out of my home and with a two minute walk, I have fly agaric everywhere. They live in symbiosis with the birch trees we have. 


Edited by salviamycelium, 27 December 2016 - 05:17 AM.


#11 mjroom

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 01:51 PM

:blush:

 


Edited by mjroom, 27 December 2016 - 04:04 PM.


#12 catattack

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 08:43 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I already briefly introduced myself in the first pinned thread and I do wonder how I'll amass three posts because I'd rather not introduce myself two more times  :blush: I'm not that cool, and those are the only threads available to me. 

 

But, a question then. I've never grown any mushrooms. It's a long story why but it boils down to that I live in a place where libs are abundant. Only problem with libs is that they grow in plain sight...

What are the chances that I could just go ahead and grow wood lovers successfully, with no previous experience with cubes etc.? My climate and local conditions (soil, type of vegetation, ...) appear to be ideal for them. 

 

I've seen the huuuge thread on wood lovers (98 pages) and by now I've read most of it. I consider myself experienced with Plants. I  :wub:  Plants. But no experience with Shrooms, other than eating them :biggrin:  :wub:  :wub:  

 

I don't plan to grow cubes (which could be a stepping stone) for two main reasons. The first one is that I don't want to have anything growing indoors except maybe some mycelium for a couple of months until I can dig a hole outside and make a bed. The other one is the potency compared to the readily available libs, and how they dry and store compared to them (not nearly as well). So I'll really just start out with the wood-lovers unless too many experienced people say this is really dumb. I will listen to input, at least considering every argument, pro and con, although I am a hardheaded person :blush: .

 

Thanks!

 

 

I just read your last post on the communal woodlover thread and I think that purrhaps you might want to try a dung lover. I understand that you may not want to grow indoors but cubensis are so much easier to dial in in comparison to woodlovers IME. If potency is your main point of contention, then grow pans, it's almost the same as growing cubes.

 

Storing all mushroom fruit bodies is essentially the same IMO, dry them out, remove o2 and they'll last indefinitely...

 

 

just this cat's .02


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#13 Arathu

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 10:35 AM

https://mycotopia.ne...wood-lover-tek/

 

Apparently pf tek is not just for the dung lover................but wood 2

 

Have a look at the link if you have the time.......... there are many options here.

 

A



#14 orangutan

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 10:59 AM

There is a lot of noise on the internet about Psilocybe cyanescens growing in Europe, especially central Europe.

 

I would try making 2 beds.  One of azurescens and one of cyanescens.  You never know which will be better adapted to your particular environment and climate.

 

Talk to @heirloomspores.  He has some experience growing wood lovers in a climate with very cold winters, I think.

 

 

No, they don't grow here, I live in the Old Continent. But I want to make them grow here :)


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#15 catattack

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 11:09 AM

 

There is a lot of noise on the internet about Psilocybe cyanescens growing in Europe, especially central Europe.

 

I would try making 2 beds.  One of azurescens and one of cyanescens.  You never know which will be better adapted to your particular environment and climate.

 

Talk to @heirloomspores.  He has some experience growing wood lovers in a climate with very cold winters, I think.

 

 

No, they don't grow here, I live in the Old Continent. But I want to make them grow here :)

 

 

And/Or @hyphaenation.


Edited by catattack, 19 January 2017 - 11:10 AM.

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#16 hyphaenation

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 01:08 PM

I'd recommend p.cyanescens ... Wavycaps! Longest fruiting season, very hardy can withstand cold winter and high elevation.

Extremly potent to a fault...

What kind of climate do you have in fall?

Edited by hyphaenation, 19 January 2017 - 01:10 PM.

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#17 Ferather

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 01:47 PM

Both cyans and azures eat the hell out of spent tea, its like little rich substrates in fiber bags. Just adding data.


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#18 Zwapa

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 03:25 PM

cyans will do the trick. if u can get hold on mycelium, or spawnbags, u can then start with cardboard to expand, later a layered bed and off u go !!

U can buy these bags if u find a seller.

Azurescens is difficult to get fruiting from my experience. U can get cyans in wooden boxes for starting and put them somewhere outside begin summer. Layering is important ! Use sand and dirt, straw and different woods. Good luck .



#19 salviamycelium

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 03:29 PM

My climate in the fall is quite cold and rainy. Normally all September and October is rainy. Even if it somehow doesn't rain every day (like this year we had no rain for six weeks straight... climate change I'd think...) even then the humidity is high up. Near 100% in the night/morning, until 11AM or so.

We  usually get the first ground frost by mid October and hard frost end of October. End of October, snow that stays until late April.


Edited by salviamycelium, 19 January 2017 - 03:33 PM.

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#20 salviamycelium

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 03:30 PM

It's very unlikely that I could get myc here. I'm in a strict country.  :blush:






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