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Truffballs?


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#1 happy4nic8r

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 09:33 PM

Okay I found this soccer ball sized growth alongside the road, and thought it was a giant puffball.

 

A few days later I was showing it to my gf and lifted it off its root and found that it was very heavy and solid. I took one photo against my foot for size reference, then sliced it open to see what was inside.

 

It looked and smelled more like a truffle than a puffball, but I'm no expert with either of these growths.

 

Any help with these? Taken in Dec. in Copperopolis. Ca.

 

truffballs1.jpg                           IMG_20161226_125319.jpg



#2 Skywatcher

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 12:44 PM

It certainly looks like a puffball. I have not seen any truffle that size. I have eaten the giant montana puffball on many occasions. They appear much whiter,and more "cauliflower" like in appearence, and the flesh is creamy white solid. The one in your pictur appears to be progressing into the internal "powder" phase, and seems darker around the outer edges. The puffballs I eat grow in California, at about 6,000 elev. The places I find them are deep shade under a combination of oak and pine, in thick leafmulch.

 

Very cool looking whatever it is!


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#3 happy4nic8r

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 12:56 PM

THIS WAS VERY SOLID, CREAMY AND REMINDED ME OF A SEMI COOKED CAULIFLOWER. 

 

HOW DO YOU PREPARE THEM? I WOULD DEFINITELY EAT THESE, NOT THESE PARTICULAR ONES, BUT THEY SMELLED AND TASTED GOOD!



#4 Skywatcher

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 06:17 PM

THIS WAS VERY SOLID, CREAMY AND REMINDED ME OF A SEMI COOKED CAULIFLOWER. 

 

HOW DO YOU PREPARE THEM? I WOULD DEFINITELY EAT THESE, NOT THESE PARTICULAR ONES, BUT THEY SMELLED AND TASTED GOOD!

My grandfather lived in the mountains, and showed these to me when I was about 10. We usually just diced them, and sauted them in butter. They have a sweeter flavor than portabella or button mushrooms, and a nice texture. When they were in season was usually was when snow was almost gone, until late spring, but thats only when I was shown to go looking for them.

 

They are delicious with eggs in an omelet, or even just sliced thick and sauteed. We always cooked them, but they smell equally good fresh.

To my knowledge, there are no poisonous puffballs, but possibly a few small ones, that are unappatising smell, or that might give some stomach distress. The large, softball to soccerball size puffball is one that I was taught had no bad lookalikes.

 

I hope you find another, a bit younger.


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#5 happy4nic8r

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 07:55 PM

Cool. My reference books said the same, but they also didn't have these particular ones located in the west coast anywhere. I guess my book is for Oregon and Washington primarily.

 

Time to go to the bookstore.

 

I found a lot of mushrooms growing wild here, and only a couple that I recognized from the ones I became familiar with in Oregon. 

 

I've got a lot to introduce to the area!! Let the games begin!


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#6 OysterFarmer

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 04:36 PM

 

THIS WAS VERY SOLID, CREAMY AND REMINDED ME OF A SEMI COOKED CAULIFLOWER. 

 

HOW DO YOU PREPARE THEM? I WOULD DEFINITELY EAT THESE, NOT THESE PARTICULAR ONES, BUT THEY SMELLED AND TASTED GOOD!

My grandfather lived in the mountains, and showed these to me when I was about 10. We usually just diced them, and sauted them in butter. They have a sweeter flavor than portabella or button mushrooms, and a nice texture. When they were in season was usually was when snow was almost gone, until late spring, but thats only when I was shown to go looking for them.

 

They are delicious with eggs in an omelet, or even just sliced thick and sauteed. We always cooked them, but they smell equally good fresh.

To my knowledge, there are no poisonous puffballs, but possibly a few small ones, that are unappatising smell, or that might give some stomach distress. The large, softball to soccerball size puffball is one that I was taught had no bad lookalikes.

 

I hope you find another, a bit younger.

 

 

There is a poisnous 'dirtball' which is very hard to find and looks unappealing anyways.  Other than that though there are no poisonous puffballs and they are pretty good eating.

 

This though looks like a puffball that got some sort of discoloration from an infection probably.  The calvatia gigantica giant puffballs are usually found in meadows with livestock.



#7 OysterFarmer

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 04:38 PM

On closer inspection I'd say it was a regular giant puffball past its prime and showing the effects of the hot sun on it.  Usually if they are white inside they are still good to go.


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#8 happy4nic8r

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 01:36 AM

If I had found it sooner, and ID'd it, I would have cooked some. Next time I will be ready, and as I'm new to this area I have a lot of new species to watch and learn about.

 

So far no amanitas, and unfortunately no cyans, azures, or pans, but each area has it's own timetable, and pretty soon I plan to introduce many outdoor species.






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