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2017 for Starters...


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#1 scott_1971_h

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 10:52 PM

So, for 2017 I thought I might expand my horizons...
So if you knew someone who came across some lengths of San Pedro, what would you suggest he does?
I was thinking he might cut them into 6 inch sections, wait 2 weeks or so for them to callus, and then set them onto a cactus/30% pumice mix.
But I have never grown cacti successfully myself, they would start growing and then start rotting because I had forgotten to neglect them... overwatering.
So... Does anyone have any suggestions?
Scott

Edited by scott_1971_h, 05 January 2017 - 10:58 PM.


#2 HankoDelicious

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 03:02 AM

I think I would wait a little longer than 2 weeks for the wounds to heal. 

 

I normally wait about a month but have forgotten about some cuttings for over three months. 

 

Put the cuttings in soil, I just use soil from my garden, with extra added stones (also from the garden). Water for a week or two so that roots can form and then just let nature water water them the rest of the time. Currently we have a severe drought and I am watering them once a month or so, but I keep an eye on them not to dry too much out or go too yellow. 

They can handle more water than other cacti but they still require periods of the roots properly drying it seems, IMHO it is very important for them. 

 

I occasionally feed my san pedro cacti some manure water that I also give my vegetable garden, though that is very OCCASIONALLY about three times a year probably. 

 

So yes, the only thing really is to make sure you DONT OVERWATER, hehehe 

 

hope this helps 



#3 scott_1971_h

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 07:21 AM

OK, I am making my way through Neptune's Playground :-)

Pretty comprehensive. Except... How big should any cuttings be? 3 inches, 6 inches, 12 inches, etc.

 

Scott



#4 HankoDelicious

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 12:00 PM

I'd say at LEAST 6 inches, the longer the better and healthier plant you will get. 



#5 Skywatcher

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 02:00 PM

Hi Scott,

Multiplying your collection is always good. It keeps you from loosing all if something should happen to one. I have found larger sections will root faster and grow more in the following year. I personally prefer an eight or nine inch cutting. The amount of time it takes to scar is dependent on humidity and air movement.  Do not dry the ends by placing in hard sunlight. This is too stressful and will reduce the water stores the cutting needs to take off. You can use a fan if you are scaring indoors, otherwise if the weather is dry, place them in a shaded location with good air circulation.

 

Pedro is not very picky about its soil, but try to avoid any mix that is heavy in peat or woody chunks. Adding the pumice is a good way to make sure you lighten the mix so it drains quickly. I like to use a powder rooting hormone like "Root tone" on cuttings, but if you do not it will still be fine as long as you have a well scarred end. It should feel solid and hard, with no soft areas.

 

When you plant the cuttings, put them about 1-2 inches deep, and support them with chopsticks or something similar if they feel wobbly. Plant them in dry mix, and do not water. 

 

Place them in a warm dry area, and only allow a little morning sun. The rest of the time should be bright shade or broken shade like you get from a small tree or shadecloth. Do not water for at least a month, longer if it is not warm. Root development is stimulated by warm soil. If it is cool it may not root until spring.

 

Once you have some root noduals starting, you can water only lightly at first. When your cuttings are fully rooted, water them through, so it comes out the bottom of the pot, and then do not water again until the soil has gone dry.

 

Be sure you mark the top direction on the cuttings if you are making several from one piece. You want to keep them upright and not mistakenly plant upside down. 

 

Some people will also plant a cutting "log style" or sideways with about the bottom third in the soil. I have not had any better success with this method, and have had more problems, so I personally prefer the upright plantings.

 

With an 8" cutting, you can expect at least one, and likely several pups. These will grow appx. 6-10" in the first year. Do not feed "Hot" or high nitrogen ferts. You would be better off not feeding at all or only feeding nutes that are for cactus, which will be 3 or less on the first number which is the nitrogen content.

 

Good grow vibes to you.


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#6 scott_1971_h

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 08:44 PM

OK, thanks,

Has anyone had any results (good or bad) with using expanded clay? I know some people who have some.

Maybe not for peyote (?too organic / wet), but for everything else (Echinopsis xxx)


Edited by Skywatcher, 07 January 2017 - 11:59 PM.


#7 Skywatcher

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 12:18 AM

To my understanding, expanded clay is basically fired, porous ceramic. This kind of material in appropriate size, is a fine additive for cactus soil. If you are planning to grow using this as the growing medium, as in hydroponics, it does not have nutrients or the water retention needed. I often add a material called cinter to my cactus mix. This is basicly a fused glass ceramic (burned silica if you prefer). This also works well to give roots some aeration, yet is small enough to not inhibit their growth.

 

Vermeculite and/or any form of wet clay is not advisable for cactus and is likely to result in rotted roots and base. 

 

Peyote prefers a well draining limey soil, so the addition of crushed oyster shell or agriculture lime is advisable.



#8 scott_1971_h

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 07:43 AM

Yes, I was thinking of adding the clay to a cactus mix of some sort instead of pumice due to availability. Some people use charcoal as well. Which is better for a 'Pedro?

Scott



#9 HankoDelicious

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 01:53 AM

Your post inspired me to go look at a patch of cacti that grows on the outskirts of the town where I live, found them in the most beautiful state of flowering at the moment! 

For those that don't know, after the flowers comes the fruits which are perfectly edible, non-hallucinogenic and really really delicious. 

 

sanpedro.jpg

sanpedro2.jpg

sanpedro3.jpg

sanpedro4.jpg

 

Is there perhaps anybody that can identify them down to species level? I have got a san pedro at home with virtually no spines but these ones be spiney as hell though most certainly an 'active' kind. 


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#10 scott_1971_h

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 04:09 AM

I always thought Pedros had 4 small spines per areole. (?sp) Correct me if I'm wrong...

But those cacti look lovely in flower, the flowers are on the large side aren't they!



#11 Skywatcher

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 01:33 AM

Pedro or any of the trichs are not picky scott. Use what you have readily available as long as it drains well. Pedros do have small spines,

 

There are a lot of hybrids these days. Variations make positive ID a bit more iffy.

 

Those are some gorgeous flowering beauties Hanko, a little long on the spine but the flower looks right. Love the fragrance of Pedro in bloom !!!!



#12 Arathu

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 01:38 AM

Excellent shots! Thank you for sharing those Hanko........... :smile:



#13 pharmer

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 11:39 AM

It looks like you live in a climate that is dry most of the time. If that is correct clay probably won't hurt your cactus

 

BUT

 

clay holds water. Trichs don't like wet feet, in fact they do poorly in it and often get rotten from the roots up IF their soil is kept too wet for too long a period. Clay would promote those conditions if your climate has a wet season.

 

I've grown bunches and bunches of Trichs. They do require some compost-like nutrition but favor soil biased toward mineral and having perlite, pumice, or any other drainage promoting fill.

 

And if you're lucky enough to live where they are native the soil should be right as-is. Your best bet for promoting faster growth would be more water but no more than will drain away from the roots quickly. And they would enjoy some nitrogen as an occasional aperitif :)

 

You can write this in stone - "Trichocereus' hate wet feet"

 

pharmeredit- aw shit. I see now that expanded clay was mentioned. My reference was to the kind of clay that comes out of slow running rivers. So, yes, expanded clay will work. I'd recommend the smallest you can buy.


Edited by pharmer, 10 January 2017 - 12:13 PM.

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#14 scott_1971_h

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 06:16 AM

If you knew someone who planted some Pedro seed, how long was it before they became Usable?



#15 scott_1971_h

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 06:24 AM

I have 3 little green balls in the tray I put some Lophophera seeds in... Yipee...

Are they easily grafted? I know they are impossibly S-L-O-W on their own roots.

Has anyone grafted one onto a fairly large pedro so that the peyote is effectively a semi-parasite for photosynthetic goodies?

Scott






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